GRAMMAR: Is it turn-on or turnon, hard-on or hardon?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 09, 2011 3:48 PM GMT
    OK grammar guys, what's the consensus on how to spell these words in a case like:

    It was such a (turn-on, turnon) for me that it gave me a (hardon, hard-on).
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    Aug 09, 2011 3:58 PM GMT
    Turnon and Hardon are last names, not words.
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    Aug 09, 2011 3:58 PM GMT
    And what's the plural of hard-on? Hards-on? Hard-ons?
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    Aug 09, 2011 3:59 PM GMT
    I usually see 'turn on' or 'turn-on' instead of 'turnon'. Meanwhile, I see 'hardon' or 'hard-on' rather than 'hard on' in the dictionary.

    I prefer both words hyphenated.
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    Aug 09, 2011 4:00 PM GMT
    wrestlervic saidOK grammar guys, what's the consensus on how to spell these words in a case like:

    It was such a (turn-on, turnon) for me that it gave me a (hardon, hard-on).


    "It was such a turn-on for me that it gave me a hard-on."

    And the plural of "hard-on" is "boners". ;)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 09, 2011 4:01 PM GMT
    I'd say "turn-on" or "turn on".

    I'd say "hard-on"or "hard on".
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 09, 2011 4:01 PM GMT
    All this talk about Hard-ons is really a Turn-on! icon_lol.gif
  • kew1

    Posts: 1595

    Aug 09, 2011 4:02 PM GMT
    I think there's at least on person here who likes Lardons
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/lardons
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 09, 2011 4:04 PM GMT
    It's both.
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/turn-on
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/turnon
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    Aug 09, 2011 4:36 PM GMT
    Gaymerboy saidIt's both.
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/turn-on
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/turnon


    Except one is slang.
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    Aug 09, 2011 5:15 PM GMT
    mickeytopogigio said
    Gaymerboy saidIt's both.
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/turn-on
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/turnon


    Except one is slang.


    Omg used to be slang, now it's an actual word too :p Just jumping ahead.
  • rafiki87

    Posts: 331

    Aug 09, 2011 5:42 PM GMT
    Oh the complexities of English writing, where there are no hard and fast rules, I lament thee!

    As per http://oxforddictionaries.com/page/punctuationhyphen/hyphen-, the non-hyphenated form is preferred. Look under the compound nouns section. Though it is acceptable to write in both hyphenated and non-hyphenated (though the words are separated by one m-space) form, provided that one maintains the SAME form in the whole text.

    My rule of thumb with situations like these is to err on clarity. If there's no ambiguity in the phrase then leave it non-hyphenated; being more visually appealing.

    However, there is a clear distinction between "30-year-old gay men" and "30 year old gay men". The former specifies gay men that are thirty years old, whilst the latter presents a picture of thirty gay toddlers.

    In short, stick to non-hyphenated unless the phrase is ambiguous.
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    Aug 09, 2011 5:45 PM GMT
    diverboi saidOh the complexities of English writing, where there are no hard and fast rules, I lament thee!


    O the intellectual freedom we gain without hard and fast rules! I'd much rather have lassitude in writing than have l'Academie Anglaise breathing down my neck.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Aug 09, 2011 5:48 PM GMT
    Actually, they're all incorrect. They should be

    hard on
    turn on
  • Latenight30

    Posts: 1525

    Aug 09, 2011 5:52 PM GMT
    Are you feeling something you are 'turned-on' "Ann Coulter is such a Turn-on for me."
    If you walk into a room you Turn on the light switch.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 09, 2011 6:16 PM GMT
    I've seen turnoff written as one word, but I'm going with hyphenating both words. It's a safe bet. Hardon looks funny, as it stresses neither hard nor on. And I like my hard-on stressed. icon_wink.gif
  • hartfan

    Posts: 1037

    Aug 09, 2011 6:27 PM GMT
    A come-on that spells "turn-on" correctly is an instant hard-on.
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    Aug 09, 2011 6:32 PM GMT
    wrestlervic saidI've seen turnoff written as one word, but I'm going with hyphenating both words. It's a safe bet. Hardon looks funny, as it stresses neither hard nor on. And I like my hard-on stressed. icon_wink.gif


    I think of a "turnoff" as a place where I leave one road and turn onto another.

    A "turn-off" is something that takes someone from hottie to nottie in 0.2 seconds, like lighting a cigarette.

  • str8hardbody9

    Posts: 1519

    Aug 09, 2011 6:36 PM GMT
    pocketnico saidI usually see 'turn on' or 'turn-on' instead of 'turnon'. Meanwhile, I see 'hardon' or 'hard-on' rather than 'hard on' in the dictionary.

    I prefer both words hyphenated.


    I totally agree w/ hyphenated, that is the correct to do it.
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    Aug 09, 2011 6:53 PM GMT
    Latenight30 saidAre you feeling something you are 'turned-on' "Ann Coulter is such a Turn-on for me."
    If you walk into a room you Turn on the light switch.


    This. (Although Ann Coulter is a massive turn-off for me.)

    In general, I'd use an unhyphenated form as a verb phrase, and a hyphenated form as a noun or adjective. My main reason for this is that an unhyphenated form can be broken up by a pronoun - for instance, "that big dick turns me on" - but the hyphenated form is a singular concept - "that big dick is a turn-on".
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    Aug 09, 2011 7:34 PM GMT
    Webster666 saidActually, they're all incorrect. They should be

    hard on
    turn on


    Actually hard-on is hyphenated.

    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/turn+on
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hard+on
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    Aug 09, 2011 8:21 PM GMT
    I'm not sure, but here in the forums I don't think too many people will really care no matter which form you use. You should probably find out the correct spelling, however. When you use the word hardon/hard-on in correspondence with your boss, coworkers, accountant, lawyer, professor, etc you want to definitely make sure you are spelling the word correctly.
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    Aug 09, 2011 9:01 PM GMT
    Iceblink saidI'm not sure, but here in the forums I don't think too many people will really care no matter which form you use. You should probably find out the correct spelling, however. When you use the word hardon/hard-on in correspondence with your boss, coworkers, accountant, lawyer, professor, etc you want to definitely make sure you are spelling the word correctly.
    icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 09, 2011 11:44 PM GMT
    Although using hyphens is the right way to spell these words, I prefer the non-hyphenated look...

    Sometimes being too grammatically correct is a turn(-)off. It looks too forced.
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    Aug 09, 2011 11:52 PM GMT
    steamfunk saidAlthough using hyphens is the right way to spell these words, I prefer the non-hyphenated look...

    Sometimes being too grammatically correct is a turn(-)off. It looks too forced.


    Ditto.