6 reasons your plans to move abroad might not work out

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 16, 2011 3:12 PM GMT
    Some thoughts if you're ready to leave America.

    This whole thing cracked my shit up. I'd say there's quite a bit of truth in it also.

    http://www.cracked.com/article_19363_6-reasons-your-plans-to-move-abroad-might-not-work-out.html
  • JDean

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    Aug 16, 2011 5:02 PM GMT
    yay i'm in a growing field of new zealand.
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    Aug 16, 2011 5:51 PM GMT
    Hmmm, my dad emigrated and he doesnt have these problems though.... hes very well liked.... and so was I most places.... I think it might be if you are looking to "get away" then it wont work.. you can never get away....

    Good example: went to Vancouver... go into a gay bar, someone's singing happy birthday in Dutch... I go to a bakery in Victoria.. I sit next to two elderly ladies who turned out to speak Dutch and were born in my country... all the way in canada, sitting next to compatriots.. YAY.. Go to whistler, wind up in a cable car-thingy with two belgians and the daughter of a dutch immigrant...

    All this in the span of five days of me leaving here just to check out Canada... surrounded by compatriotes and its neighbours, far far away

    Cant get away anywhere... it follows you around.. really it does
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    Aug 16, 2011 5:52 PM GMT
    ^ may I add to that: I come back home... one day later, i meet my new classmate: a Canadian living in Vancouver, married to a .. dutch Immigrant... and a gay couple to boot

    :/ eyerolls
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    Aug 16, 2011 5:53 PM GMT
    And yes, most Europeans do speak like 6 languages....
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    Aug 16, 2011 6:12 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidDepends on the country in Europe and also if you're in a major metropolitan area.

    When I did a pilgrimage across all of northern Spain all the Spaniards and French people I met (either from the south of France or throughout the north of Spain) did not speak any other language other than their native tongue.

    I met two Spanish women who could speak English and two French woman who could speak English as well.


    Compared to Central and Northern Europe, indeed Spaniards seldom speak another language besides Spanish and their regional language (Basque, Galician, Catalan). A few years ago Prime Minister Zapatero launched a campaign to reform foreign language education in Spain citing that only 12% of the population has a working knowledge of English.

    Heh, the funny thing is one of the common arguments I hear about immigrants in the US is that they never learn English. I can tell you right now that I've known far more many Latin Americans who speak English than Spaniards. But that's because the US's proximity to Latin America allows for American influence. Many people there become interested in learning English. The UK doesn't have a similar effect on Spain despite its proximity. Although there are more British citizens immigrating to Spain than the other way around!
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    Aug 16, 2011 6:22 PM GMT
    It's true that it often doesn't take long to find people of your own kind in another place. When I studied in Russia, there were no Americans in the dorm where I stayed. However, I ended up befriending a group of Koreans and Chinese who became my best buddies while I was there. Most of the Russian students tended to keep their own, but I did become good friends with a few of them. I feel like they only took interest in me because I was one of the few foreigners there who could speak Russian well.
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    Aug 16, 2011 6:35 PM GMT
    Hmmm, that is a very humorous article but not very accurate. Of course, it speaks only of that one guy's experience. Moving from the States to Mexico and then later to Spain I have found to be very pleasurable and the best of moves in my lifetime. I would not move back to the States unless forced to do so. The problem with many immigrants is they move to a new country and expect the culture to adapt to their ways. One day on the beach, I heard this one immigrant from England say in a huff, "I have been here for 12 years and they still do not speak English." icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Aug 16, 2011 6:40 PM GMT
    It really just depends on each country and their laws. Spain is more lenient towards immigrants from Latin America, Brazil, and Portugal due to cultural ties. People from these regions have an easier time immigrating to Spain and can become citizens within just a few years. Meanwhile all other immigrants have to wait at least 10 years before being eligible for citizenship.

    Heh, I think a lot of European countries just want to restrict immigrants from Eastern Europe, Northern Africa, and the Middle East as much as possible.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Aug 16, 2011 7:01 PM GMT
    From 1994 - 2004, I lived in Fiji and experienced none of the problems listed in the article, although there were other problems.

    I had retired to Fiji. The reason I returned was that I became uneasy with the medical care available. I had assumed that in case of emergency, I could be immediately evacuated to Sydney, but it's not that easy. Even if one can easily pay for medical treatment in Australia, getting a medical visa is so difficult that if the problem is serious, one would probably die before getting a medical visa. A tourist visa to Australia is easy for an American citizen to get; one can immediately get an electronic visa on the Internet. And, one can easily illegally get medical treatment on a tourist visa of one looks well getting on the plane.

    There was no problem getting along with the people in Fiji, and I did not live in a foreign enclave. However, although it would seem to be economical to live in Fiji, I found it impossible to ignore the problems faced by people with whom I became friends. Thus, I ended up paying school fees for people. Once I ended up accompanying a friend's wife to Sydney for urgent medical treatment, for which I paid.

    Right now, I would not recommend traveling to Fiji; it is under an oppressive military dictatorship and traveling there would tend to support the dictatorship.
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    Aug 16, 2011 7:49 PM GMT
    pocketnico said
    Heh, I think a lot of European countries just want to restrict immigrants from Eastern Europe, Northern Africa, and the Middle East as much as possible.


    Probably so. I have some teammates from Sweden, heavy accents. They tell me all the time, "you'll be very popular in Sweden". And these are straight White guys telling me that.

    Now you know, if I can go to a country and be a commodity like that... I don't care what barriers I have to cross LOL.
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    Aug 16, 2011 8:23 PM GMT
    GreenHopper saidAnd yes, most Europeans do speak like 6 languages....


    3. 6 is unusual. Speaking 3 is necessary if one doesn´t wish to be ashamed of one´s ignorance. I speak 3 and two halves....
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    Aug 16, 2011 8:35 PM GMT
    Lostboy said
    GreenHopper saidAnd yes, most Europeans do speak like 6 languages....


    3. 6 is unusual. Speaking 3 is necessary if one doesn´t wish to be ashamed of one´s ignorance. I speak 3 and two halves....


    Hmmm, well then its mostly the Dutch Kingdom Citizens tha speak like 6.. most everyone I know in the Dutch caribbean speaks like about 6, often like 4 and three or more halves at least
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    Aug 16, 2011 8:41 PM GMT
    Fit4FitnDenver said
    pocketnico said
    Heh, I think a lot of European countries just want to restrict immigrants from Eastern Europe, Northern Africa, and the Middle East as much as possible.


    Probably so. I have some teammates from Sweden, heavy accents. They tell me all the time, "you'll be very popular in Sweden". And these are straight White guys telling me that.

    Now you know, if I can go to a country and be a commodity like that... I don't care what barriers I have to cross LOL.


    Hmm, well race is not usually an issue up there.. I find its more nationalities and politics that get discriminated against... because of this.. Northern Europeans welcome a black American before they would welcome a white American... because the white wing of American politics tends to focus on things like religious extremism and the like.. the blacks tend to be more liberal.. not to mention its not white American culture that is heavily represented in mainstream pop culture in Europe.. its the black culture... the hiphop, the R&B, and the Caribbean black culture, the reggae etc.... Rock is there too, but its more in the "alternative" crowd... very Seattlite-ish type crowd... and very britpop too...

    Basically in short, you wanna move to Northern Europe.. be a black American to be popular, dont be white or be somewhat hated lol
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    Aug 16, 2011 9:18 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    pocketnico saidIt really just depends on each country and their laws. Spain is more lenient towards immigrants from Latin America, Brazil, and Portugal due to cultural ties.


    That's putting it mildly. I think there is a guilt factor involved for having exploited Latin America for over 500 years. Hence, their leniency when it comes to allowing South American immigrants to live in Spain. And unfortunately, a lot of the riffraff (gang bangers) bring their violent ways with them and cause problems in Europe. I'd send them back to be honest.


    I'm sure they could send back all those Latin Kings thugs and Romanian hookers if they really wanted to...
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    Aug 16, 2011 10:01 PM GMT
    I loved living and working abroad. I usually say negative things, but those were great times. I've lived in various places for various lengths of time. Some were just long business trips. My favorite countries are Argentina, Singapore, Australia, and Thailand. You really have to roll with the punches when you do this. You will often rent and have to make due on less money. You have to enjoy learning different languages, but some places are English friendly (such as Australia!). You have to research visa requirements, politics, crime, transportation, costs and many other details. You have to LIKE doing this. The world is not a strip mall in Orange County. It's a strange, exciting, dangerous place. I highly recommend it, if you have the passion for it.
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    Aug 16, 2011 11:52 PM GMT
    Or one could just design a flag, plant it in their front yard, and declare themselves sovereign........not that i've ever given that any thought or anything.
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    Aug 17, 2011 12:04 AM GMT
    I have actually heard from quite a few Americans who have complaints against USA but I guess its mostly because they are really not aware of the problems faced by people in other countries.
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    Aug 17, 2011 2:59 AM GMT
    Wow this was a really great article IMO. This is my favorite paragraph:

    "I found upon arriving here that Americans, unlike people anywhere else in the world, are completely happy to tell me all about their unusual bowel movements or their battle with drug addiction, even if I'm just standing next to them in the checkout line. They will happily go on national TV to discuss things that in other countries would drive people to culturally-approved suicide. Add it all up, and you wind up with a culture that is obsessed with discussing its own flaws.
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    Aug 17, 2011 3:35 AM GMT
    Great thread. I wonder If I can apply for citizenship in España. My father was born in Madrid. I'm a bastard so since I don't know him or have any paperwork, might not work out.
  • creature

    Posts: 5197

    Aug 17, 2011 4:02 AM GMT
    I have considered moving to Europe. Just a thought. But if I move, I feel like I'm giving up the opportunity to help make things better here. If all of the disgruntled people left, it'd be nothing better but the troublemakers.
  • FRE0

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    Aug 17, 2011 5:38 AM GMT
    asnextdoor saidI have actually heard from quite a few Americans who have complaints against USA but I guess its mostly because they are really not aware of the problems faced by people in other countries.


    Not necessarily. People may be well aware of the problems faced by people in other countries, and still be aware of problems faced by people here in the U.S. of A.

    Progress is impaired if people are not aware of problems and willing to point them out. Being a patriotic American does not mean that one must be blind to the problems here. Even though overall the U.S. of A. is one of the best places in the world to live, there is room for improvement.
  • sfboy987

    Posts: 209

    Aug 17, 2011 8:20 AM GMT
    So much for moving to London icon_sad.gif ah well I'm still a bit optimistic
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    Aug 18, 2011 2:32 AM GMT
    I studied abroad in Madrid, and I can relate to some of the things in that article.

    Asians are treated a little worse in Spain than the US. Asian immigrants (mostly Chinese) sell beer on the streets at night to people going out. I've had random Spaniards telling me "no quiero cerveza" (I don't want beer) while I walked by them. I will get carded by bouncers along with my black friends while they let my white friends through with no questions. One time I was waiting for a friend to come down and let me into her apartment and I saw a huge package on the street for a store next door with an invoice in English. I was like oooooooooooooo English, where is this from. Then a couple of cops walk towards me, and ask me what I was doing here and a bunch of other questions. My white friend came down and giggled when she saw me talking to the cops because she knew they were profiling me. I was also profiled at the airport in the Canary Islands. Some security guy asks where I'm from and I say the US. He doesn't believe me and asks me to go into a room. I show him my passport and then he becomes all nice and relaxed with me.

    I planned a trip to London while i was in Spain. The whole time I was in London, I was so happy that I could understand what everybody was saying. I could even hear conversations that I didn't want to hear. My Spanish is good enough to carry on simple conversations, but I don't always understand everything, and I have to listen carefully and think about the words to say. It felt so great to communicate with people effortlessly in London.

    By the end of my study abroad program, I was ready to go back to NYC. I missed it so much. My friends, the diversity, English, my own apartment, etc. I enjoyed Madrid but I love NYC so much more.
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    Aug 20, 2011 11:36 PM GMT
    Good article. Anyone have stories (good or bad) about experiences in Central/ South America? I'm planning on taking a 3 month exploratory trip to consider the idea of living abroad (Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Peru, Panama, or Costa Rica)

    Not concerned with language barrier. Thanks!icon_biggrin.gif