Wow, so my best friends phone number was taken from him.

  • Neurons

    Posts: 537

    Aug 16, 2011 9:04 PM GMT
    Earlier today my friends Torch had a weird message saying his sim card wasn't working. I allowed him to use my phone to do whatever he needed to do. Fast forward about 6 hours and now we JUST found out that Bell (our provider) has given someone else his number. His mom called his phone and someone else answered. Found out that the guy who answered bought a phone this morning and they gave him that number.

    Now, we ARE in Canada so I'm not sure if he could take any legal action or anything.. but I kind of joked about it and he wants to know if he's able to.

    Basic question: Can he sue for the company giving his phone number on his active phone to another customer?

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    Aug 16, 2011 9:06 PM GMT
    TheKrisPandemic saidBasic question: Can he sue for the company giving his phone number on his active phone to another customer?

    In the US, yes. In Canada, IDK.
  • Neurons

    Posts: 537

    Aug 16, 2011 9:06 PM GMT
    Thanks for the quick reply!
  • iHavok

    Posts: 1477

    Aug 16, 2011 9:24 PM GMT
    why would he sue?
    why wouldn't he just contact the phone company, and explain the situation, so they can return the number to him...

    It's not that huge a mistake, and obviously one...
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    Aug 16, 2011 9:26 PM GMT
    TheKrisPandemic saidThanks for the quick reply!
    You're welcome. icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 16, 2011 9:35 PM GMT
    TheKrisPandemic said

    Basic question: Can he sue for the company giving his phone number on his active phone to another customer?



    I've learned that Americans do that whatever happened, so I guess he could.

    I heard that a guy sued Facebook for deleting his account. He said that he lost contact with many friends and stuff like that and i think he won.

    He could say the same thing...
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    Aug 16, 2011 10:10 PM GMT
    No, absolutly not it's a genuine and common mistake, likley someone slipped a digit when changing or assaigning a new customer their simcard I've done it a dozen times.


    At best he could recouperate any charges the other person had run up on the account and the phone company refused to credit

    It's the evquivilent of you dialing a wrong number and the other person sueing you for the inconvience of having to answer the phone.

    If you push it you'll just get some poor kid in the agent or service desk in trouble
  • Neurons

    Posts: 537

    Aug 16, 2011 10:44 PM GMT
    iHavok saidwhy would he sue?
    why wouldn't he just contact the phone company, and explain the situation, so they can return the number to him...

    It's not that huge a mistake, and obviously one...


    He's not going to, I jokingly mentioned it and he was curious if he could. He and I know that you can sue for basically anything in the US so we were wondering if he'd have a case in Canada if he were to sue.
  • iHavok

    Posts: 1477

    Aug 16, 2011 10:51 PM GMT
    Its a pretty gross habit American's have...
    and I think a large part of our healthcare issues.

  • CincyBOJ

    Posts: 306

    Aug 17, 2011 12:37 AM GMT
    he should have all his friends call and text that number so much that they will beg to give the phone number back. lol.

    icon_twisted.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2011 1:04 AM GMT
    CincyBOJ saidhe should have all his friends call and text that number so much that they will beg to give the phone number back. lol.

    icon_twisted.gif
    Best. Idea. Ever! icon_biggrin.gif
  • danisnotstr8

    Posts: 2579

    Aug 17, 2011 1:08 AM GMT
    No court would waste their time on a suit like this. But it's definitely worth a month or two of free service, don't you think? That's a win for your friend and a win for the phone company as well. They'll do it.
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    Aug 17, 2011 1:30 AM GMT
    I've never heard of that happening in the US, but can't say it is impossible. Normally for new phones, a new number is chosen from a pool of unassigned numbers, and there is nothing for a clerk to manually enter. If a specific number is desired, that would be manually entered, but if not available, it could not be used.

    If it did occur somehow, I think the phone company would correct the error and give back the number and change the number for the new folks. If the phone company would not agree to that, it varies by state, but California has a Public Utilities Commission, a government agency that oversees communication companies, and they could intervene.