Freakonomics author: "Reason No. 1,382,992 to Hate Politics" (on the Texas Employment Picture)

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 17, 2011 6:01 PM GMT
    http://www.freakonomics.com/2011/08/17/reason-no-1382992-to-hate-politics/

    Is there any question that if Governor Rick Perry of Texas were a Democrat that all the left-leaning editorialists, economists, bloggers, etc., would be bending over backward to praise the Texas employment picture rather than bending over backward to belittle it?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 17, 2011 6:20 PM GMT
    Yes. See attacks on stimulus and every other.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 17, 2011 6:22 PM GMT
    Christian73 saidYes. See attacks on stimulus and every other.


    And yet, other states also got considerably more stimulus per capita and didn't achieve the same results. Funny that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 17, 2011 6:30 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    Christian73 saidYes. See attacks on stimulus and every other.


    And yet, other states also got considerably more stimulus per capita and didn't achieve the same results. Funny that.


    What results? A glut of minimum wage jobs in state that is last in the nation in everything from child health insurance to environmental protections?

    That's not impressive at all.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 17, 2011 6:40 PM GMT
    Christian73 said
    riddler78 said
    Christian73 saidYes. See attacks on stimulus and every other.


    And yet, other states also got considerably more stimulus per capita and didn't achieve the same results. Funny that.


    What results? A glut of minimum wage jobs in state that is last in the nation in everything from child health insurance to environmental protections?

    That's not impressive at all.


    Wrong again - and actually the opposite. Where are you getting your information from Christian?

    http://www.politicalmathblog.com/?p=1590

    "Sure, Texas has lots of jobs, but they're mostly low-paying/minimum wage jobs"

    Let's look at the data. Here's a link: Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates

    Texas median hourly wage is $15.14... almost exactly in the middle of the pack (28th out of 51 regions). Given that they've seen exceptional job growth (and these other states have not) this does not seem exceptionally low.

    But the implication here is that the new jobs in Texas, the jobs that Texas seems to stand alone in creating at such a remarkable pace, are low paying jobs and don't really count.

    If this were true, all these new low-paying jobs should be dragging down the wages data, right? But if we look at the wages data since the beginning of the recession (click to enlarge, states are listed alphabetically)

    [...] My advice to anti-Perry advocates is this: Give up talking about Texas jobs. Texas is an incredible outlier among the states when it comes to jobs. Not only are they creating them, they're creating ones with higher wages.


    The Texas job machine is made all the more remarkable by the fact that they have been accepting a wave of migrants from other states while others like California are seeing net emigration. Schools in Texas also produce some of the best students in the US when compared along similar demographic lines - and some of the best public schools in the US - and to boot, Texas doesn't spend nearly as much per capita as most other states (which I imagine must befuddle you).

    http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 18, 2011 2:13 PM GMT
    With a few more numbers: http://www.politicalmathblog.com/?p=1590

    But if Texas has so many jobs, why do they have such a high unemployment rate? Let's take a closer look at that data.

    As a percentage of the number of pre-recession jobs, here is a chart of the growth of a selection of states. (For clarity, in this chart I selected a number of the largest states and tried to focus on states that have relatively good economic reputations. I did not chart all 50 states b/c it would have taken me too long.)



    We can see that Texas has grown the fastest, having increased jobs by 2.2% since the recession started. I want to take a moment and point out that second place is held by North Dakota. I added North Dakota to my list of states to show something very important. North Dakota currently has the lowest unemployment rate of any state at 3.2%. And yet Texas is adding jobs at a faster rate than North Dakota. How can this be?

    The reason is that people are flocking to Texas in massive numbers. Starting at the beginning of the recession (December 2007), let's look at how this set of states have grown in their labor force.



    Again I would quote one of his concluding remarks: "My advice to anti-Perry advocates is this: Give up talking about Texas jobs. Texas is an incredible outlier among the states when it comes to jobs. Not only are they creating them, they're creating ones with higher wages."
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 2:33 PM GMT
    "Yes, Rick Perry Deserves Credit For The Texas Economy"

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/jamestaylor/2011/08/24/yes-rick-perry-deserves-credit-for-the-texas-economy/

    Texas is seeing job growth at a pace that is the envy of the nation. Approximately 40% of the nation’s job growth since June 2009 occurred in Texas. Texas Governor and Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry is hopeful voters will remember this fact when they enter the election booth next year, while Perry detractors argue Perry is merely the inadvertent beneficiary of luck and happenstance.

    An Aug. 19 article on the website Slate is typical of the Perry detractors. The article offers three reasons why “it seems silly for Perry to take credit for the state’s performance.”

    The first and foremost reason cited by Slate is “Texas has lots of oil and gas … pain at the pump helped the few states with lots of fuel to sell and commodity-related jobs. Oil-rich North Dakota, most notably, barely noticed the downturn. And Texas felt it less than most other states.” The New York Times and other left-leaning media outlets have made the same argument.


    It is encouraging that the political left is finally beginning to realize that energy production can and does make the difference between energy producing states like North Dakota and Texas experiencing job growth and relative prosperity while the rest of the nation suffers the worst economic conditions in over 70 years. But Perry detractors completely miss the facts when they assert, as did the Slate article, “So what does it all mean for other states? Well, they cannot produce oil out of thin air.”

    Make no mistake, many states are well positioned to realize the same energy production benefits as North Dakota and Texas. These include, at a minimum, Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia and Wyoming — each of which has ready access to abundant resources of the same shale oil and shale gas that is fueling economic growth in North Dakota and Texas. Energy production and economic strength in North Dakota and Texas are the results of wise and courageous policy decisions designed to encourage rather than stifle energy production (something that fellow Forbes columnist Joel Kotkin pointed out in his recent piece on Texas). Going forward, the question is which leaders in which states have the political courage to stand up to environmental activist groups and their media allies who routinely vilify energy production?

    As I noted in last week’s column, the Sierra Club and other environmental activist groups are urging New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) to sign a bill passed by the heavily Democratic New Jersey legislature that would ban shale gas production in the state. Environmental activist groups similarly protest oil and gas production in every other state, as well as on federal lands where energy production could create valuable jobs and earn the federal government much-needed revenues while simultaneously relieving prices at the pump. What sets North Dakota and Texas apart from many other states (and the federal government) is political leaders who will courageously endure heated criticism from environmental activist groups in order to provide jobs and a healthy economy for state residents.

    Which brings us back to Perry. The Texas economy is reaping the benefits of energy production not just because Texas, like many other states, has access to abundant oil and natural gas reserves. Rather, the Texas economy is reaping the benefits of energy production because Rick Perry and other state government officials are encouraging rather than stifling energy production.

    In states like New Jersey, the legislature supports an outright ban on shale gas production. Other states seek to tax and regulate energy production to a crawl. In North Dakota and Texas, however, leaders like Rick Perry have had the foresight to encourage rather than vilify energy production.

    Yes, Slate, the success of the Texas economy has been driven by wise policy decisions rather than blind luck, and Rick Perry deserves a Texas-sized share of the credit.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 2:46 PM GMT
    riddler78 said"Yes, Rick Perry Deserves Credit For The Texas Economy"

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/jamestaylor/2011/08/24/yes-rick-perry-deserves-credit-for-the-texas-economy/

    Texas is seeing job growth at a pace that is the envy of the nation. Approximately 40% of the nation’s job growth since June 2009 occurred in Texas. Texas Governor and Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry is hopeful voters will remember this fact when they enter the election booth next year, while Perry detractors argue Perry is merely the inadvertent beneficiary of luck and happenstance.

    An Aug. 19 article on the website Slate is typical of the Perry detractors. The article offers three reasons why “it seems silly for Perry to take credit for the state’s performance.”

    The first and foremost reason cited by Slate is “Texas has lots of oil and gas … pain at the pump helped the few states with lots of fuel to sell and commodity-related jobs. Oil-rich North Dakota, most notably, barely noticed the downturn. And Texas felt it less than most other states.” The New York Times and other left-leaning media outlets have made the same argument.


    It is encouraging that the political left is finally beginning to realize that energy production can and does make the difference between energy producing states like North Dakota and Texas experiencing job growth and relative prosperity while the rest of the nation suffers the worst economic conditions in over 70 years. But Perry detractors completely miss the facts when they assert, as did the Slate article, “So what does it all mean for other states? Well, they cannot produce oil out of thin air.”

    Make no mistake, many states are well positioned to realize the same energy production benefits as North Dakota and Texas. These include, at a minimum, Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia and Wyoming — each of which has ready access to abundant resources of the same shale oil and shale gas that is fueling economic growth in North Dakota and Texas. Energy production and economic strength in North Dakota and Texas are the results of wise and courageous policy decisions designed to encourage rather than stifle energy production (something that fellow Forbes columnist Joel Kotkin pointed out in his recent piece on Texas). Going forward, the question is which leaders in which states have the political courage to stand up to environmental activist groups and their media allies who routinely vilify energy production?

    As I noted in last week’s column, the Sierra Club and other environmental activist groups are urging New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) to sign a bill passed by the heavily Democratic New Jersey legislature that would ban shale gas production in the state. Environmental activist groups similarly protest oil and gas production in every other state, as well as on federal lands where energy production could create valuable jobs and earn the federal government much-needed revenues while simultaneously relieving prices at the pump. What sets North Dakota and Texas apart from many other states (and the federal government) is political leaders who will courageously endure heated criticism from environmental activist groups in order to provide jobs and a healthy economy for state residents.

    Which brings us back to Perry. The Texas economy is reaping the benefits of energy production not just because Texas, like many other states, has access to abundant oil and natural gas reserves. Rather, the Texas economy is reaping the benefits of energy production because Rick Perry and other state government officials are encouraging rather than stifling energy production.

    In states like New Jersey, the legislature supports an outright ban on shale gas production. Other states seek to tax and regulate energy production to a crawl. In North Dakota and Texas, however, leaders like Rick Perry have had the foresight to encourage rather than vilify energy production.

    Yes, Slate, the success of the Texas economy has been driven by wise policy decisions rather than blind luck, and Rick Perry deserves a Texas-sized share of the credit.
    riddler riddler.. I am surprised! Your intellectual lack of integrity strikes AGAIN.
    The "author" --->
    From his profile on Forbes:
    James Taylor
    James M. Taylor is senior fellow for environment policy at The Heartland Institute and managing editor of Environment & Climate News
    Tsk tsk tsk...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 3:01 PM GMT
    Republicans are trying to turn Perry into their "Messiah" because the other Republican presidential candidates are horrendous. Republicans outside of Texas are excited about Perry because they are nor familiar with his record, style of politics, and have not been paying attention for the last 20+ years.

    Texas Republicans won't support Perry. Here is why:

    1) Perry is a big government, career politician.
    2) The total debt in Texas has doubled under Rick Perry. He used government stimulus money to balance the budget.
    3) Perry wanted to secede from the Union. Then, asked for government funds to help with Texas wildfire disaster.
    4) Rick Perry has spearheaded the effort to lease roads in Texas to foreign companies, to turn roads that are already free to drive on into toll roads, and to develop the Trans-Texas Corridor which would be part of the planned NAFTA superhighway system.
    5) Rick Texas has repeatedly raised taxes in Texas as governor. Texans are faced with significantly higher taxes than before Perry was governor.
    6) 23 states have better unemployment records than Texas even though Texas economy is based in oil/gas.
    7) Perry was a democrat that supported Al Gore
    icon_cool.gif Texas has the highest percentage of workers making minimum wage out of all 50 states.
    9) Rick Perry often gives speeches about illegal immigration, but when you look at the facts, he has been incredibly soft on the issue.
    10) Rick Perry actually issued an executive order in 2007 that would have forced almost every single girl in the state of Texas to receive the Gardasil vaccine before entering the sixth grade. Perry had "connections" with Merck to receive campaign contributions.
    11) Texas has the highest number of residents without health insurance.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 3:06 PM GMT
    TropicalMark saidriddler riddler.. I am surprised! Your intellectual lack of integrity strikes AGAIN.
    The "author" --->
    From his profile on Forbes:
    James Taylor
    James M. Taylor is senior fellow for environment policy at The Heartland Institute and managing editor of Environment & Climate News
    Tsk tsk tsk...


    Tsk tsk - are you making an ad hominem argument?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 3:21 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    TropicalMark saidriddler riddler.. I am surprised! Your intellectual lack of integrity strikes AGAIN.
    The "author" --->
    From his profile on Forbes:
    James Taylor
    James M. Taylor is senior fellow for environment policy at The Heartland Institute and managing editor of Environment & Climate News
    Tsk tsk tsk...


    Tsk tsk - are you making an ad hominem argument?
    Nope.. Im pointing out to you (and everyone else) publicly that your "op-ed" source is indeed NOT an economics expert but a writer of environmental policy and is extremely BIASED in his 'writings'. His employer dictates that!

    Tsk tsk.. Like I said, your intellectual lack of inclusion and integrity.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 3:41 PM GMT
    TropicalMark said
    riddler78 said
    TropicalMark saidriddler riddler.. I am surprised! Your intellectual lack of integrity strikes AGAIN.
    The "author" --->
    From his profile on Forbes:
    James Taylor
    James M. Taylor is senior fellow for environment policy at The Heartland Institute and managing editor of Environment & Climate News
    Tsk tsk tsk...


    Tsk tsk - are you making an ad hominem argument?
    Nope.. Im pointing out to you (and everyone else) publicly that your "op-ed" source is indeed NOT an economics expert but a writer of environmental policy and is extremely BIASED in his 'writings'. His employer dictates that!

    Tsk tsk.. Like I said, your intellectual lack of inclusion and integrity.


    Actually - by definition what you've done is an attempted ad hominem attack considering his arguments are sound even if he takes a biased position. As an addendum, Taylor is apparently nationally known in the US as an expert on employment law - which is very much relevant when it comes to the job creation machine that is Texas.