Tea Party More Unpopular Than Atheists & Muslims

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 17, 2011 8:19 PM GMT
    http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/ticket/survey-surprising-finding-tea-party-less-popular-atheists-160220531.html

    And yet the Republican party is allowing the Tea Party to define and drive the agenda of the Repub party!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 17, 2011 9:13 PM GMT
    It's a bit rubbish being an atheist, isn't it?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 17, 2011 9:37 PM GMT
    Biggest predictor of being a Tea Partier: social conservatism and past GOP affiliation. Forget about small government, fiscal responsibility, nonpartisanship.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/17/opinion/crashing-the-tea-party.html?_r=1Beginning in 2006 we interviewed a representative sample of 3,000 Americans as part of our continuing research into national political attitudes, and we returned to interview many of the same people again this summer. As a result, we can look at what people told us, long before there was a Tea Party, to predict who would become a Tea Party supporter five years later. We can also account for multiple influences simultaneously — isolating the impact of one factor while holding others constant.

    Our analysis casts doubt on the Tea Party’s “origin story.” Early on, Tea Partiers were often described as nonpartisan political neophytes. Actually, the Tea Party’s supporters today were highly partisan Republicans long before the Tea Party was born, and were more likely than others to have contacted government officials. In fact, past Republican affiliation is the single strongest predictor of Tea Party support today.

    What’s more, contrary to some accounts, the Tea Party is not a creature of the Great Recession. Many Americans have suffered in the last four years, but they are no more likely than anyone else to support the Tea Party. And while the public image of the Tea Party focuses on a desire to shrink government, concern over big government is hardly the only or even the most important predictor of Tea Party support among voters.

    So what do Tea Partiers have in common? They are overwhelmingly white, but even compared to other white Republicans, they had a low regard for immigrants and blacks long before Barack Obama was president, and they still do.

    More important, they were disproportionately social conservatives in 2006 — opposing abortion, for example — and still are today. Next to being a Republican, the strongest predictor of being a Tea Party supporter today was a desire, back in 2006, to see religion play a prominent role in politics. And Tea Partiers continue to hold these views: they seek “deeply religious” elected officials, approve of religious leaders’ engaging in politics and want religion brought into political debates. The Tea Party’s generals may say their overriding concern is a smaller government, but not their rank and file, who are more concerned about putting God in government.


    That is why the Tea Party is unpopular--nobody in their right minds wants a Christian theocracy in America.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 17, 2011 10:15 PM GMT
    q1w2e3 saidBiggest predictor of being a Tea Partier: social conservatism and past GOP affiliation. Forget about small government, fiscal responsibility, nonpartisanship.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/17/opinion/crashing-the-tea-party.html?_r=1Beginning in 2006 we interviewed a representative sample of 3,000 Americans as part of our continuing research into national political attitudes, and we returned to interview many of the same people again this summer. As a result, we can look at what people told us, long before there was a Tea Party, to predict who would become a Tea Party supporter five years later. We can also account for multiple influences simultaneously — isolating the impact of one factor while holding others constant.

    Our analysis casts doubt on the Tea Party’s “origin story.” Early on, Tea Partiers were often described as nonpartisan political neophytes. Actually, the Tea Party’s supporters today were highly partisan Republicans long before the Tea Party was born, and were more likely than others to have contacted government officials. In fact, past Republican affiliation is the single strongest predictor of Tea Party support today.

    What’s more, contrary to some accounts, the Tea Party is not a creature of the Great Recession. Many Americans have suffered in the last four years, but they are no more likely than anyone else to support the Tea Party. And while the public image of the Tea Party focuses on a desire to shrink government, concern over big government is hardly the only or even the most important predictor of Tea Party support among voters.

    So what do Tea Partiers have in common? They are overwhelmingly white, but even compared to other white Republicans, they had a low regard for immigrants and blacks long before Barack Obama was president, and they still do.

    More important, they were disproportionately social conservatives in 2006 — opposing abortion, for example — and still are today. Next to being a Republican, the strongest predictor of being a Tea Party supporter today was a desire, back in 2006, to see religion play a prominent role in politics. And Tea Partiers continue to hold these views: they seek “deeply religious” elected officials, approve of religious leaders’ engaging in politics and want religion brought into political debates. The Tea Party’s generals may say their overriding concern is a smaller government, but not their rank and file, who are more concerned about putting God in government.


    That is why the Tea Party is unpopular--nobody in their right minds wants a Christian theocracy in America.





    So those of us on the left were CORRECT to state that the Tea Party is nothing but the extreme right wing of the Republican party.
    And those of us on the left were CORRECT to point out that there's a racist streak that runs throughout the Tea Party.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 17, 2011 10:46 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    rickrick91 saidSo those of us on the left were CORRECT to state that the Tea Party is nothing but the extreme right wing of the Republican party.
    And those of us on the left were CORRECT to point out that there's a racist streak that runs throughout the Tea Party.


    RickRick,

    You forgot to add: intolerant, reckless, mean-spirited and heartless.

    I hope for your sake, and the sake of 97% of the RJ membership, that the Democrats win big in 2012... otherwise I fear we'll be losing a huge chunk of the RJ membership to the undertaker.





    I hope for the sake of our country, that the Democrats win big in 2012.

    COUNTRY FIRST