Going to school to become a psychiatrist :)

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    Aug 17, 2011 11:02 PM GMT
    Ever since I was in high school I always wanted to become a psychiatrist. Made,really good grades even took up Psychology which was my favorite class. Now im going to school to get my Medical Degree. Right now everyting is easy but I wanted to know. If it is going to get harder as the semister goes on....

    For the people who are or went to school for same degree as I am please tell me how it is. And after a graduate and find a job in my field whats there salary..... Thanks icon_smile.gif
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    Aug 17, 2011 11:35 PM GMT
    well, from heavy personal experience, i hate psychiatrists, and recommend being a psychologist instead.

    sorry.
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    Aug 18, 2011 12:06 AM GMT
    rosco87 saidwell, from heavy personal experience, i hate psychiatrists, and recommend being a psychologist instead.

    sorry.
    The only difference between the two is psychiatrists can prescribe medicine.
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    Aug 18, 2011 12:10 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    rosco87 saidwell, from heavy personal experience, i hate psychiatrists, and recommend being a psychologist instead.

    sorry.
    The only difference between the two is psychiatrists can prescribe medicine.


    I take offense to that. I am a psychologist I'm not a psychiatrist. I deal with behavioral analysis not counseling and dead cats..
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    Aug 18, 2011 12:15 AM GMT
    ^ Ogh, come on guys, shall we not start the whole "Behavioralist vs Freudian" thing again... its so the fifties

    moving on..

    So I had a psychology degree (BA), and then went to med school to be a psychiatrist.. my plan was to become a child psychiatrist and deal with trauma in ex-child soldiers and child prostitutes in Central America, Africa, and Asia

    that WAS my plan... I doubt thats what i'll do still.. most ppl in med school go a different directions once they're in rotations... at this point what I will do after, is totally up in the air.. I could become a family physician, or a researcher, or an epidemiologist, right now I just dont know... not to mention when I walked into a psychiatric ward for class, i didnt particularly get too enamoured by the prospect of a five-year residency dealing with the mentally ill

    so keep an open mind.. it might change
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    Aug 18, 2011 12:16 AM GMT
    mnboy said
    paulflexes said
    rosco87 saidwell, from heavy personal experience, i hate psychiatrists, and recommend being a psychologist instead.

    sorry.
    The only difference between the two is psychiatrists can prescribe medicine.


    I take offense to that. I am a psychologist I'm not a psychiatrist. I deal with behavioral analysis not counseling and dead cats..
    And if you could prescribe meds, you'd be a psychiatrist.
    BTW, what are you doing out of my basement?
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    Aug 18, 2011 12:23 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    mnboy said
    paulflexes said
    rosco87 saidwell, from heavy personal experience, i hate psychiatrists, and recommend being a psychologist instead.

    sorry.
    The only difference between the two is psychiatrists can prescribe medicine.


    I take offense to that. I am a psychologist I'm not a psychiatrist. I deal with behavioral analysis not counseling and dead cats..
    And if you could prescribe meds, you'd be a psychiatrist.
    BTW, what are you doing out of my basement?


    icon_sad.gif i dont want to be associated with psychiatrists.

    It was getting too crowded down there so I decided to relocate. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 18, 2011 1:00 AM GMT
    jprichva said
    paulflexes said
    rosco87 saidwell, from heavy personal experience, i hate psychiatrists, and recommend being a psychologist instead.

    sorry.
    The only difference between the two is psychiatrists can prescribe medicine.

    That used to be true. Now, due mainly to insurance company payment protocols, the psychiatrist practically never offers classic Freudian 'talk therapy'. They have become drug dispensers and hospitalizers, because that's what they'll get paid for. If you want classic Freudian-style talk therapy, or any kind of talking sessions, nowadays it's the clinical psychologist that will provide it.


    exactly, there was a lady i used to see and she wouldn't listen to me for more than 2 seconds, she had a checklist and depending on how many boxes were checked off you were lumped into a category and prescribed accordingly. it was robotic and i consider it an insult to humanity.
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    Aug 18, 2011 1:09 AM GMT
    mnboy: Are you not 19? It's a little far fetched to say you are a psychologist w/o credentials.
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    Aug 18, 2011 1:15 AM GMT
    deltalimen saidmnboy: Are you not 19? It's a little far fetched to say you are a psychologist w/o credentials.


    Agreed.
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    Aug 18, 2011 1:42 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    rosco87 saidwell, from heavy personal experience, i hate psychiatrists, and recommend being a psychologist instead.

    sorry.
    The only difference between the two is psychiatrists can prescribe medicine.


    Sorry Paul but you couldn't be more wrong about that.

    That's sort of like saying the only difference between a 747 and a Cessna are the number of engines.

    Most psychiatrists DO NOT deal with psychotherapy. They refer out to counselors and psychologists for that. Their main role is to prescribe medication and to make sure that the client adheres to it, monitor side effects, adjust dosages, etc.

    Sure, its important for some psychological disorders/issues - particularly severe mental illnesses like Bipolar and Schizophrenia. But with other issues... depression, anxiety, personality disorders... psychologists are very much central to treatment.

    Also, psychologists conduct many different kinds of psychological evaluations.... for emotional, intellectual/cognitive functioning and for forensic/court/competency to stand trial evals.

    I am getting my doctorate in Clinical Psych, so in less than a year I'll have my degree and can be called a psychologist.... so I'd say I'm a reasonably credible source on all this ;-)

  • nanidesukedo

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    Aug 18, 2011 2:10 AM GMT
    Psychiatrists also play important legal roles in the hospitals: They often are consulted for determining a patient's capacity to make medical decisions. They are also often called upon to assess whether a patient can have a Temporary Detention Order (TDO) placed against them...While other doctors are capable of assessing these things themselves, legally...they often time defer to psychiatrists to give themselves better footing in case anything were to pop up. While medicine management is the bread and butter for a psychiatrist, a hospital psychiatrist often times plays a large role in legal matters. Also, a psychiatrist is often time the only doctor who will pay any attention to a patient's psychological and social stressors and can be critical in setting them up with social workers and therapists.
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    Aug 18, 2011 2:21 AM GMT
    Psychiatry is cool. All you do is diagnose and write scripts. You don't have to listen to people's bullshit as much as a therapist does.
  • nanidesukedo

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    Aug 18, 2011 2:26 AM GMT
    JackNWNJ saidPsychiatry is cool. All you do is diagnose and write scripts. You don't have to listen to people's bullshit as much as a therapist does.


    Oh...you still listen to a lot of it, especially if you end up working in a smaller hospital. It comes with the field. Often times, the job of a psychiatrist is to elicit contributing stressors...while you don't have to probe in all that deep and can just defer to a therapist, it's still a large portion of your job.
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    Aug 18, 2011 2:28 AM GMT
    Private practice is the way to go.
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    Aug 18, 2011 2:55 AM GMT
    deltalimen saidmnboy: Are you not 19? It's a little far fetched to say you are a psychologist w/o credentials.


    Military brat, got my GED when I was 14.. Its really not that hard now a days. Especially, with the Young Scholar Program through the Navy Family & Support Center. Graduated from MnSU-TC with a BA in Behavioral Analysis with a minor in Biology last Feb.
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    Aug 18, 2011 3:02 AM GMT
    theantijock said
    deltalimen saidmnboy: Are you not 19? It's a little far fetched to say you are a psychologist w/o credentials.


    Age? A psychologist taking offense was the only clue you needed.


    How so? There are many different branches of Psy and not all of us deal or want to deal with people and their problems. Nor do we want to be associated with them.
    An orthodontist has a medical degree but he is in no way related to a pediatrician who also has a medical degree. Lumping a behavioral analysis with a psychiatrist is just as whish-washey.
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    Aug 18, 2011 3:03 AM GMT
    An orthodontist is a dentist. I think you meant a head-n-neck surgeon. icon_lol.gif
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    Aug 18, 2011 3:10 AM GMT
    q1w2e3 saidAn orthodontist is a dentist. I think you meant a head-n-neck surgeon. icon_lol.gif


    Mehh.. I meant an oral surgeon. Thought that what orthodontists where..
    Well, Im not in the dental field so I really have no idea with they are called. But the point is still that same. You don't want someone who pulls wisdom teeth delivering your babes or visversa.
  • nanidesukedo

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    Aug 18, 2011 9:57 AM GMT
    mnboy said
    deltalimen saidmnboy: Are you not 19? It's a little far fetched to say you are a psychologist w/o credentials.


    Military brat, got my GED when I was 14.. Its really not that hard now a days. Especially, with the Young Scholar Program through the Navy Family & Support Center. Graduated from MnSU-TC with a BA in Behavioral Analysis with a minor in Biology last Feb.



    I didn't think a BA made you a psychologist? A psychologist has at least a master's or a PhD, I thought (though, I could be easily wrong). I have my BS in behavioral and counseling psychology and am, by no means, a psychologist.
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    Aug 18, 2011 10:22 AM GMT
    If you're finding your degree so easy, maybe you could brush up on your writing skills.
  • Koaa2

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    Aug 18, 2011 11:53 AM GMT
    You will have many more options as an MD, even if you decide not to become a Psychiatrist once you have finished school. I have known many of each, and Psychologists often seem to resent their postions in the profession, as they often have to rely on a MD for prescriptions etc. While you are young get all the education you can accomplish, and can afford, you will never regret it.
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    Aug 18, 2011 12:08 PM GMT
    Koaa2 saidYou will have many more options as an MD, even if you decide not to become a Psychiatrist once you have finished school. I have known many of each, and Psychologists often seem to resent their postions in the profession, as they often have to rely on a MD for prescriptions etc. While you are young get all the education you can accomplish, and can afford, you will never regret it.


    This argument goes back and forth.

    Psychiatrists say psychologists cant do enough w/o meds... and psychologists say Psychiatrists do nothing but throw relatively ineffective drugs (for depression, for instance) at patients, without getting to the root of the problem.

    That's why I am all for states allowing Psychologists to get certified in psycho-pharmacology and giving us our own script writing privileges. icon_smile.gif
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    Aug 18, 2011 1:02 PM GMT
    ZbmwM5 said
    Koaa2 saidYou will have many more options as an MD, even if you decide not to become a Psychiatrist once you have finished school. I have known many of each, and Psychologists often seem to resent their postions in the profession, as they often have to rely on a MD for prescriptions etc. While you are young get all the education you can accomplish, and can afford, you will never regret it.


    This argument goes back and forth.

    Psychiatrists say psychologists cant do enough w/o meds... and psychologists say Psychiatrists do nothing but throw relatively ineffective drugs (for depression, for instance) at patients, without getting to the root of the problem.

    That's why I am all for states allowing Psychologists to get certified in psycho-pharmacology and giving us our own script writing privileges. icon_smile.gif


    The best mental health professionals I've ever talked to were both nurse practitioners, who could write scripts if they wanted to but (at least in my case) stuck completely with talk therapy.
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    Aug 18, 2011 1:11 PM GMT
    jprichva said
    If you want classic Freudian-style talk therapy, or any kind of talking sessions, nowadays it's the clinical psychologist that will provide it.


    I don't want to quibble, but if you want classic talk-therapy, it's most likely a social worker who will provide it. In the United States, clinical social workers provide more mental health services than psychologists, psychiatrists, and counselors combined.

    (But the larger point is still true--it is highly unlikely that you will see a psychiatrist for talk therapy.)