In a fitting display of promotion of carelessness, today I saw:

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    Aug 18, 2011 2:49 AM GMT
    219rX%2BbfCLL._SL160_.jpg being fed to
    17_cokebaby_lgl.jpg
    Except I don't think the baby could sit up on its own yet. And the baby bottle was about 3/4 full of Coke. I doubt it was watered down.
    The mother didn't look to be in even a marginally healthy weight range herself.
    I asked a pediatrician friend of mine, he said he would have called social work. This is keeping in mind, one of the first "real" food introduced to babies is french fries.

    My questions: Why would you do this to your own baby? Do you have friends or relatives who feed crap like this to babies? Have you ever said anything to them?

    This was in an Emergency Department waiting room at the hospital.
  • JP85257

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    Aug 18, 2011 2:51 AM GMT
    How about minding your business?
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    Aug 18, 2011 2:53 AM GMT
    The baby wasn't gassy enough? Or hyper enough?
    Lack of education in Texas?
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    Aug 18, 2011 3:04 AM GMT
    I see lots of kids in the clinic that are, pardon my judgement, poorly reared. All we do is document it and maybe eventually make a suggestion.

    One of my favorites:

    A mother said, "Sorry he smells like crank. I just picked him up from his Dad's, but I tried to spray him with some FeBreeze."

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    Aug 18, 2011 3:04 AM GMT
    JP85257 saidHow about minding your business?


    Can't really be minding your business when a baby's health is being endangered. Those pop cans can seriously cause health issues to an infant. The sugar in it is the least of the problem. There are so many other things than are unhealthy. Should have called social service.
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    Aug 18, 2011 3:09 AM GMT
    When I was in med school I remember a case of severe iron deficiency in a baby. Turns out the mom was feeding him cow's milk way too early.

    Guess the Coke- addicted baby will have even worse problems.

    Pediatricians aren't just for shots. They educate moms who would otherwise not have the resources to bring their babies up in a healthy fashion.
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    Aug 18, 2011 3:12 AM GMT
    A very, very large sector of the population doesn't know what "unhealthy" food is. Good food is food that tastes good. They literally have no concept or grasp of junk food.
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    Aug 18, 2011 3:14 AM GMT
    Could these people really not know better? I can see the cow milk happening. Maybe not severe. But Coke and crank? And then telling you about it?



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    Aug 18, 2011 3:14 AM GMT
    5532465704_6d9a12320b.jpg

    LOL ads back then could get away with a lot of bullshit....

    Sugar+5.jpg
    sugar-ad-1.jpg
    http://goretro.blogspot.com/2010/03/sugar-is-good-for-you.html
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    Aug 18, 2011 3:17 AM GMT
    carminea saidCould these people really not know better? I can see the cow milk happening. Maybe not severe. But Coke and crank? And then telling you about it?

    To answer your question:
    Can you give a little bit more detail on the social class, race and age of the mom and the setting in which you saw her?
  • JP85257

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    Aug 18, 2011 3:28 AM GMT
    The lady needs to be educated not have the fucking child taken away. This is the problem with the nanny state.

    Mind your business.
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    Aug 18, 2011 3:31 AM GMT
    If all the unhealthy foods were taken off the shelves, large grocery stores would be reduced to the size of a convenience store.
    Unfortunately, the vast majority of people don't realize that...including nutritionists.
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    Aug 18, 2011 3:37 AM GMT
    q1w2e3 said
    Can you give a little bit more detail on the social class, race and age of the mom and the setting in which you saw her?

    Caucasian, late 20s-early 30s, 15-20 kg overweight for height sitting in ED waiting room with a Choose My Plate poster in field of view. Appeared well kept with neat clothing and hygiene but not teeth or feet. Was using an Iphone/Ipod. Baby appeared to be cared for. Possible smoker-she had a lighter on a keychain.
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    Aug 18, 2011 3:42 AM GMT
    I went on a hunger strike when I was 2. I refused to eat everything except for McDonalds french fries for two weeks. Obviously I don't know why. But junk food saved my life.

    Other than that, junk food is BAD FOOD for babies and humans in general.
  • JP85257

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    Aug 18, 2011 3:42 AM GMT
    carminea said
    q1w2e3 said
    Can you give a little bit more detail on the social class, race and age of the mom and the setting in which you saw her?

    Caucasian, late 20s-early 30s, 15-20 kg overweight for height sitting in ED waiting room with a Choose My Plate poster in field of view. Appeared well kept with neat clothing and hygiene but not teeth or feet. Was using an Iphone/Ipod. Baby appeared to be cared for. Possible smoker-she had a lighter on a keychain.

    What part of TX do you live in?

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    Aug 18, 2011 3:44 AM GMT
    carminea said
    q1w2e3 said
    Can you give a little bit more detail on the social class, race and age of the mom and the setting in which you saw her?

    Caucasian, late 20s-early 30s, 15-20 kg overweight for height sitting in ED waiting room with a Choose My Plate poster in field of view. Appeared well kept with neat clothing and hygiene but not teeth or feet. Was using an Iphone/Ipod. Baby appeared to be cared for. Possible smoker-she had a lighter on a keychain.


    In other words, a low-middle class mom who uses her iPhone for long chats rather than the internet search function for "raising healthy babies", who's acquired all the bad habits of her class (smoking, poor dental care). The caring for her baby is limited by not by the lack of affection but by her lack of knowledge which is easily imparted by routine medical care by a pediatrician.
    I would not be surprised if she is not insured medically, since you're seeing her in an ER, in Texas, no less. (25% uninsured, and CHIP programs vastly underenrolled because of lack of similar coverage for adults).

    http://www.texmed.org/template.aspx?id=5517More than half of the uninsured children are eligible for public programs, but are not enrolled. In Texas, this could be a result of the SCHIP program requirement to re-enroll every six months or the lack of parent coverage in the program. As of May 2009, 474,213 children are enrolled in CHIP -- 33,046 less than September 2003, when the original cuts were implemented.
  • JP85257

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    Aug 18, 2011 3:46 AM GMT
    q1w2e3 said
    carminea said
    q1w2e3 said
    Can you give a little bit more detail on the social class, race and age of the mom and the setting in which you saw her?

    Caucasian, late 20s-early 30s, 15-20 kg overweight for height sitting in ED waiting room with a Choose My Plate poster in field of view. Appeared well kept with neat clothing and hygiene but not teeth or feet. Was using an Iphone/Ipod. Baby appeared to be cared for. Possible smoker-she had a lighter on a keychain.


    In other words, a low-middle class mom who uses her iPhone for long chats rather than the internet search function for "raising healthy babies", who's acquired all the bad habits of her class (smoking, poor dental care). The caring for her baby is limited by not by the lack of affection but by her lack of knowledge which is easily imparted by routine medical care by a pediatrician.
    I would not be surprised if she is not insured medically, since you're seeing her in an ER, in Texas, no less. (25% uninsured, and CHIP programs vastly underenrolled because of lack of coverage for adults).

    Im just curious....What makes you some sort of expert?
  • JP85257

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    Aug 18, 2011 3:46 AM GMT
    It was Coca Cola....Not Jack Daniels.
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    Aug 18, 2011 3:50 AM GMT
    JP85257 said
    Im just curious....What makes you some sort of expert?


    Don't pretend to be an expert on babies, but I do see adults in a very similar population in my field, except I get my patients late, i.e. when bad habits are ingrown and their health is on a downward spiral.
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    Aug 18, 2011 3:52 AM GMT
    lol found another one!

    baby%2B7up.jpg
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    Aug 18, 2011 3:57 AM GMT
    q1w2e3 said
    In other words, a low-middle class mom who uses her for long chats rather than the internet search function for "raising healthy babies", who's acquired all the bad habits of her class (smoking, poor dental care). The caring for her baby is limited by not by the lack of affection but by her lack of knowledge which is easily imparted by routine medical care by a pediatrician.
    I would not be surprised if she is not insured medically, since you're seeing her in an ER, in Texas, no less. (25% uninsured, and CHIP programs vastly underenrolled because of lack of similar coverage for adults).

    She was insured all right. And made sure everyone knew at the triage counter. But even then, she has access to internet. She watches TV where they run these public service commercials about good nutrition just about every three hours. And there's common sense in not feeding a baby with no teeth 3/4 of a baby bottle of coke. Even the Standard American Diet is not that bad. Other people in the waiting room were staring at her as well. Not to mention the Choose My Plate poster with 5-3-2-1 guidelines on it about 4 feet from her.
    I want to blame somebody. But I don't know who to blame. Maybe we should have called social work.

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    Aug 18, 2011 4:00 AM GMT
    carminea said
    q1w2e3 said

    In other words, a low-middle class mom who uses her iPhone for long chats rather than the internet search function for "raising healthy babies", who's acquired all the bad habits of her class (smoking, poor dental care). The caring for her baby is limited by not by the lack of affection but by her lack of knowledge which is easily imparted by routine medical care by a pediatrician.
    I would not be surprised if she is not insured medically, since you're seeing her in an ER, in Texas, no less. (25% uninsured, and CHIP programs vastly underenrolled because of lack of similar coverage for adults).

    She was insured all right. And made sure everyone knew at the triage counter. But even then, she has access to internet. She watches TV where they run these public service commercials about good nutrition just about every three hours. And there's common sense in not feeding a baby with no teeth 3/4 of a baby bottle of coke. Even the Standard American Diet is not that bad. Other people in the waiting room were staring at her as well. Not to mention the Choose My Plate poster with 5-3-2-1 guidelines on it.
    I want to blame somebody. But I don't know who to blame. Maybe we should have called social work.


    Well, I'm sorry. Then she's just ignorant.icon_eek.gif
  • JP85257

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    Aug 18, 2011 4:01 AM GMT
    Its a COKE not booze or cocaine.

    SHIT....
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    Aug 18, 2011 4:05 AM GMT
    Let's explain this in Simple English (sorry about the English part of the English)icon_biggrin.gif:

    Is it all right to give my baby fizzy and soft drinks?

    http://www.babycentre.co.uk/baby/startingsolids/fizzy-and-soft-drinks/

    No, it’s best not to give your baby fizzy or soft drinks. Fruit squashes and flavoured milk are not a good choice for your baby, either.

    Fizzy and soft drinks and fruit squashes are very sugary and acidic, and they can damage your baby’s emerging teeth. Flavoured milk contains added sugar too.

    These drinks can fill your baby up and spoil her appetite for her meals and the nutritious foods she needs.

    Your baby may also have diarrhoea if she drinks a lot in one go. Her tummy won't be able to cope with a high intake of sugar.

    If your baby often has sugary drinks, it encourages her to learn bad eating habits as she grows and she may become overweight.
  • JP85257

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    Aug 18, 2011 4:06 AM GMT
    I am not defending giving the child a soda. dont get me wrong.


    Its a matter of minding your business. If she wants a toothless fattie then so be it.