Camping Meals

  • Latenight30

    Posts: 1525

    Aug 18, 2011 11:21 AM GMT
    Just wanting some good ideas for food. Going for a long day over night tent trip this weekend.
    What are some of your favorites?
    Thank you
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 18, 2011 3:27 PM GMT
    Whole wheat pasta with canned chicken... add sauce and spice to taste. It's pretty easy and not really bad for you.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 18, 2011 3:35 PM GMT
    Make spaghetti at home... drop it in a freezer bag, and freeze it overnight. Then it will defrost during the day in your pack, and all you have to do is re-heat it for dinner.

    I once cooked lobster on a camping trip... wrapped it in some aluminum foil with a ton of butter and placed it directly in the fire. Impressed the hell outta the people I was with.
  • vintovka

    Posts: 588

    Aug 18, 2011 3:39 PM GMT
    I was in Nova Scotia recently camping out and found this out by accident--I had some tuna (canned) and bread, but nothing to put in it except an avocado, so I just mashed the avocado into the tuna--it turned out to be really good, but probably something you would want to make and eat right away.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 18, 2011 3:43 PM GMT
    Tazo995 saidWhole wheat pasta with canned chicken... add sauce and spice to taste. It's pretty easy and not really bad for you.


    Sorry, cannned chicken ewwwwwwwww!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 18, 2011 4:00 PM GMT
    You want food sealed in packets for lightness and packing ease and comfort, that don't require refrigeration. Even tuna fish comes this way now, though more expensive than a can. Don't forget a can opener if you do take cans, or get all pull-tops (which can break on you). You can ALWAYS open a packet. There are also energy & granola bars. Drink plenty of water with them to avoid constipation. And do bring toilet paper along.

    Same with that old standard and one of my favorites, beef jerky strips - eat with water. Skip most bars with chocolate, it often melts. Pack the granola carefully or it will crumble. All those items are available in supermarkets. Sample them first before you're stuck in the woods with something you hate. You want to be eating both protein & carbs. Instant coffee also comes in packets, you can make it cold if necessary. Also bring fast-food packets of salt & pepper, and sugar or sweetener if you like. Put them in zip-lock bags, and any other food packets that aren't made of a foil-type waterproof material.

    Outdoors and camping stores, like Cabela's, sell specialized camping and survival food. I've given you a link below. This stuff is usually more expensive than similar products you'll find in the supermarket, but does give you an idea of what's out there. A lot of it's dehydrated, like we had in the US Army, and ideally meant to be mixed with water, and even heated, but can also be munched dry in a pinch (but again, drink plenty of water with it). Don't be scared by some of the super-high prices, they sell a lot of this stuff in bulk. Go though the whole list to find single servings. They have everything from Beef Stroganoff (our Army version wasn't bad) to pad thai (never tried that as a camp food).

    I couldn't make a direct link to the destination page. So from this home page, select the "Camping" drop-down from the top bar. Then select "Survival & Navigation." At the bottom of the page you'll see a pic for "Emergency & Camping Food." Click on "View all 81 items."

    http://www.cabelas.com
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 18, 2011 4:01 PM GMT
    A big ol ribeye!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 18, 2011 4:04 PM GMT
    Corned beef hash.

    I hate cooking complicated stuff while camping.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Aug 18, 2011 4:18 PM GMT
    depends on what sort of cooking setup you'll have access to.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 18, 2011 4:26 PM GMT
    anything you can make on a grill, or we usually make a nice hearty stew in the morning and let it sizzle over the fire all day and eat it whenever
  • wild_sky360

    Posts: 1492

    Aug 18, 2011 4:42 PM GMT
    If it's a multi day base camp, I tend to go all out; steaks on the mini grill..steamed veggies...salad.

    For a quick, post hike meal, or light overnight trip, I follow endo's idea....a one pot reheat. The dish is fully cooked and frozen. If it's in your pack, you still have to insulate so the outside doesn't spoil while it defrosts through the day. Just wrap it in something bulky like a sweatshirt.

    It's usually grilled chicken or steak, that I slice and mix in with a rice dish and then freeze. Some fresh veggies can be added a few minutes before it's ready to serve. Don't freeze those. They don't even need to be chilled all day, just insulated from too much heat. I wouldn't pre slice them though, unless you're going to keep them cool. Same for a salad. Just completely prep it ahead of time and put it in an oversized bag that you've squeezed the air out of. When you add dressing, just toss it in the bag...no mess.

    If the salad is going to be in a cooler all day, you have to protect it from the ice or it will turn to mush within an hour. Wrap the bag in a hand towel...place all of that in a larger bag.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 18, 2011 4:46 PM GMT
    calibro saiddepends on what sort of cooking setup you'll have access to.

    Yeah, that's why I've given him heatless solutions above. Most can still be heated with the right facilities, and maybe somebody's bringing a backpacker's stove or something. But if they get a lot of rain and can't use fires, and you should never cook inside a tent, then the food still must be edible without cooking or heating.

    Furthermore, I don't know their itinerary. If they're doing some hiking they may need to plan for a cold backpacking lunch on the trail, and snacks along the way.

    I've been doing this for so long it's second-nature to me (12 years before joining the Army, 25 years in uniform, and back to civilian-only camping since 1994, until very recently due to failing health). And if I've got no food at all, I know how to live off the land in most terrains. In fact, I used to like to catch & prepare my own food (mainly fish & seafood) even when using my camper trailer with a refrigerator in it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 18, 2011 5:07 PM GMT
    wild_sky360 saidIf it's a multi day base camp, I tend to go all out; steaks on the mini grill..steamed veggies...salad.

    For a quick, post hike meal, or light overnight trip, I follow endo's idea....a one pot reheat. The dish is fully cooked and frozen. If it's in your pack, you still have to insulate so the outside doesn't spoil while it defrosts through the day. Just wrap it in something bulky like a sweatshirt.

    It's usually grilled chicken or steak, that I slice and mix in with a rice dish and then freeze. Some fresh veggies can be added a few minutes before it's ready to serve. Don't freeze those. They don't even need to be chilled all day, just insulated from too much heat. I wouldn't pre slice them though, unless you're going to keep them cool. Same for a salad. Just completely prep it ahead of time and put it in an oversized bag that you've squeezed the air out of. When you add dressing, just toss it in the bag...no mess.

    If the salad is going to be in a cooler all day, you have to protect it from the ice or it will turn to mush within an hour. Wrap the bag in a hand towel...place all of that in a larger bag.

    Ah, you're going the 5-star route. I was thinking along more primitive lines. Against the possibility that facilities are limited, and even if the weather turns bad. But sounds like you know what you're doing.

    In my camper I would always love to do something fancy, with a floral arrangement on the table inside, residential place settings, and exploiting what was basically a full kitchen including gas burners & microwave, but also with a grill outside.

    I'm not a good cook, so I'd bring my daily catch, more than I or a companion could eat ourselves, to campground neighbors who had elaborate steamers for crab and whatnot, that I did not. I'd offer them half if they'd cook my portion, too. No one ever turned me down, mostly families with a lot more mouths to feed than their own limit would accommodate.

    So I would sit having a martini in my attached screen porch, watching the sunset, as my catch was cooked. And then sitting down to something marvelous like a whole freshly-caught Dungeness crab, either alone or with a companion. And watch night fall, and all the party lights come on, around all the RV canopies and strung across their sites, as mine had, too. And smell the campfires and charcoal grills. It was marvelous. [SIGH]
  • wild_sky360

    Posts: 1492

    Aug 18, 2011 5:26 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    wild_sky360 saidIf it's a multi day base camp, I tend to go all out; steaks on the mini grill..steamed veggies...salad.

    For a quick, post hike meal, or light overnight trip, I follow endo's idea....a one pot reheat. The dish is fully cooked and frozen. If it's in your pack, you still have to insulate so the outside doesn't spoil while it defrosts through the day. Just wrap it in something bulky like a sweatshirt.

    It's usually grilled chicken or steak, that I slice and mix in with a rice dish and then freeze. Some fresh veggies can be added a few minutes before it's ready to serve. Don't freeze those. They don't even need to be chilled all day, just insulated from too much heat. I wouldn't pre slice them though, unless you're going to keep them cool. Same for a salad. Just completely prep it ahead of time and put it in an oversized bag that you've squeezed the air out of. When you add dressing, just toss it in the bag...no mess.

    If the salad is going to be in a cooler all day, you have to protect it from the ice or it will turn to mush within an hour. Wrap the bag in a hand towel...place all of that in a larger bag.

    Ah, you're going the 5-star route. I was thinking along more primitive lines. Against the possibility that facilities are limited, and even if the weather turns bad. But sounds like you know what you're doing.

    In my camper I would always love to do something fancy, with a floral arrangement on the table inside, residential place settings, and exploiting what was basically a full kitchen including gas burners & microwave, but also with a grill outside.

    I'm not a good cook, so I'd bring my daily catch, more than I or a companion could eat ourselves, to campground neighbors who had elaborate steamers for crab and whatnot, that I did not. I'd offer them half if they'd cook my portion, too. No one ever turned me down, mostly families with a lot more mouths to feed than their own limit would accommodate.

    So I would sit having a martini in my attached screen porch, watching the sunset, as my catch was cooked. And then sitting down to something marvelous like a whole freshly-caught Dungeness crab, either alone or with a companion. And watch night fall, and all the party lights come on, around all the RV canopies and strung across their sites, as mine had, too. And smell the campfires and charcoal grills. It was marvelous. [SIGH]


    Sounds nice Art.
    I like good, fresh food while camping, but like minimal prep and clean up for lack of sanitary conditions. Everything is individually packed...ie..green beens in a bag with butter slice, salt, pepper ..ready to drop in the pan and toss the bag.

    When you're hiking all day, food is food. You want it quick and ez..so you can enjoy the martini of courseicon_wink.gif. With the frozen one pots, you just put it on simmer, have some wine, and then just wipe out the pot with a paper towel. Hate doing dishes in the dark
  • Jerebear

    Posts: 329

    Aug 18, 2011 11:57 PM GMT
    Seeing as how you are just tenting the one night, I would skip the expensive stuff they make for backpackers and go with regular food.

    Corn on the cob can be cooked easily over open flame if there's a grill. Leave it in the husks and just lay them on the grill, the husks get burnt to a crisp but they keep the moisture in and the corn inside is cooked to perfection.

    I'm a traditionalist and have smokies for my meat. Sure they arent that nutritious but I only go camping once or twice a year, how much damage can they do. Besides, if you are concerned about the preservatives and all that crap, go to your local butcher and get some fresh ones without the garbage.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 21, 2011 12:57 AM GMT
    For a quick trip like this, Pop Tarts, tins of tuna, the little one cup tins of soup or pasta, and fruit.

    If I'm on a camping trip with a group, there's nothing like making a big pot of fried potatoes, onions, sausage, and eggs, with a little bit of hot sauce. THAT is a great camping breakfast.
  • somedaytoo

    Posts: 704

    Sep 21, 2011 12:59 AM GMT
    Potatos wrapped in bacon and coocked on the camp fire
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 21, 2011 6:27 PM GMT
    i hate camping food in general, when i camp i always seem to make better meals, no burgers, dogs, but real, homemade good food. however, i do love a can of cold refried beans..... yummmm.... looks like cat food...hehehe
    precook stuff at home, bag it and then just re-heat... and dont forget the bottle of red wine... makes everything taste that much better....
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 21, 2011 9:01 PM GMT
    i always hike or horseback ride 2 camp. all i take is dehydrated foods, nuts, and H2O. my rule is this: if i can't carry it in, i don't need it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 16, 2012 10:57 AM GMT
    You would be surprised what foods can last in your pack. Hard cheeses and eggs go a few days. Veggies go soggy, but great to cook with. I usually cook elegant. I pack light and food takes up most of the weight, but I am plenty content with that. Place foods more likely to go bad in the center of your bag, keeps it better longer. Anyway, I don't have my recipies on hand, but I will post them later.

    I know I'm reviving a dead thread, but camp cooking got me excited.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 17, 2012 5:08 PM GMT
    All of these recipes are for 2 servings

    Chicken Curry Wrap
    Great throw together, no cook meal

    7 oz Pouch Chicken
    2.5ox Shelf Stable Ranch (they sell dipping cups that don't need refrigerated)
    2 Tortillas (separate tortillas with a paper towel. Plastic wrap entire tortillas and roll for compact storage)

    In a Zip-top quart sized bag:
    1/8 cup Raisins
    1/8 cup salted cashews
    1/2 Tbs Curry Powder
    1/2 tsp Ground Cumin
    1/4 tsp Cayenne Pepper (optional)
    1/8tsp Ground Black Pepper


    On Site:
    Combine all of the ingredients together in the Zip-top bag. Mix well and serve on tortilla. Roll it up like a burrito.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 17, 2012 5:16 PM GMT
    Chicken Cranberry Rice

    7oz Pouch Chicken

    In a Zip-top quart sized bag add:
    1 cup Instant Rice
    2 Tbs Dried Cranberries
    2 tsp Dried Onions
    1/2 tsp Garlic Powder
    1 tsp Chicken Bouillon
    1/2 tsp Dried Parsley

    At Camp:
    Boil 2 1/2 cups of water
    Pour water into Zip-top bag (or vice versa if your pot is big enough)
    Stir and let stand for 10 minutes
    Add Chicken
    Eat when rice is fully cooked.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 17, 2012 5:20 PM GMT
    MREs. Nomnomnom.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 17, 2012 5:22 PM GMT
    Creamy Clam Chowder
    A little heavier than the other recipes, but worth it

    Keep all ingredients separate:
    1/4 pound Butter
    1 Medium Onion
    32 oz Milk (Buy Powdered for backpacking)
    5-6 oz Box Dehydrated Potatoes
    1 Tbs Flour
    ~7oz pouch/can of Clams, Tuna, or Salmon
    Pepper to taste
    Bread Rolls

    At Camp:
    Saute Chopped onion in butter until translucent
    Add Flour to make a paste
    Slowly add milk (re-hydrated if bought from powder) while stirring
    Add Clams and Potatoes
    Simmer 10-15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until potatoes are re-hydrated
    Sprinkle with pepper.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 17, 2012 5:28 PM GMT
    Greek Salad
    Best eaten the 1st night if on a multi-day hike

    Keep all ingredients separate:
    1 Boil-in-bag Rice
    1/2 cup Greek Salad (Caesar if you can't find Greek)
    7-oz Pouch Chicken
    1/3 Crumbled Feta (bring unopened container to preserve freshness)
    2 cups Cherry Tomatoes
    1 Cucumber
    4 oz can black olives
    Dash of Basil

    In Camp:
    Boil Water then add Rice
    In a separate pot, add halved tomatoes, sliced cucumber, and olives. Stir in dressing and basil.
    Add cooked rice and chicken to veggie pot
    Mix well and top with Feta.