15 Minutes Daily Exercise Adds 3 Years To Life

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    Aug 20, 2011 1:28 PM GMT
    http://www.futurepundit.com/archives/008245.html

    HOUSTON -- Taiwanese who exercise for 15 minutes a day, or 92 minutes per week, extended their expected lifespan by three years compared to people who are inactive, according to a study published today in The Lancet.

    "Exercising at very light levels reduced deaths from any cause by 14 percent," said study senior author Xifeng Wu, M.D., Ph.D., professor and chair of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Epidemiology. "The benefits of exercise appear to be significant even without reaching the recommended 150 minutes per week based on results of previous research."
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    Aug 20, 2011 2:28 PM GMT
    Equally intriguing, especially for most of the guys on RJ, is the following paragraph in the article. . .

    All the way up to 100 minutes of exercise per day more exercised translated into additional reduction of risk of death.

    Lead author Chi-Pang Wen, M.D., of the National Health Research Institutes of Taiwan, and colleagues also found that a person's risk of death from any cause decreased by 4 percent for every additional 15 minutes of exercise up to 100 minutes a day over the course of the study. Those exercising for 30 minutes daily added about four years to life expectancy.




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    Aug 20, 2011 2:36 PM GMT
    It's true, you get all those extra years at the end.

    But the very fact that you've taken care of yourself all those years suggests you also have a much better shot of being active and healthy right up until the end. Which makes it worth it.
  • HndsmKansan

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    Aug 20, 2011 2:41 PM GMT
    LittleDudeWithMuscles saidIt's true, you get all those extra years at the end.

    But the very fact that you've taken care of yourself all those years suggests you also have a much better shot of being active and healthy right up until the end. Which makes it worth it.


    Absolutely agree with Billy! And everything that comes along with it... fewer pills, quality of life.... everything factors in! Excercise and fitness is definitely where it's at!
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    Aug 20, 2011 3:09 PM GMT
    theantijock said
    LittleDudeWithMuscles said...But the very fact that you've taken care of yourself all those years suggests you also have a much better shot of being active and healthy right up until the end. Which makes it worth it.


    True but pending what disease you might wind up with. While what is good for the heart is generally what is good for the brain, so that exercise could be good for keeping Alzheimer's at bay, it isn't guaranteed. My grandfather played tennis for hours every day but still got it. Mom stayed fit and swam laps with me but still got it.

    As my mother was in very good shape when she got AD, The progression of the disease lasted about 14 years, likely longer than someone who was not as physically fit because probably someone who didn't have the muscle tone or balance would have experienced falls, etc;, which could have accelerated the decline and shortened her years of suffering.

    As with most things, even being in shape can be a mixed blessing.

    That doesn't mean that it isn't best to try to stay healthy. I'm just saying--and not to be negative, just practical--that even that can work against you.



    Well, it's not really practical to suggest there's a downside to working out, eating right and staying healthy.

    Sure, if you're searching for exceptions, you can find them. There are centenarians out there who never did a thing to take care of themselves, and somehow they're still here.

    And, as with absolutely everything, one can occasionally find unintended negative consequences to positive behaviors. (Though they are almost always far, far outweighed by the positive.)

    That said, the evidence is massive, overwhelming and indisputable that taking care of yourself adds quality years and maybe decades to your life (not to mention feeling and looking better throughout those years). Sounds like an easy choice.
  • Celticmusl

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    Aug 20, 2011 3:32 PM GMT
    Becoming a vegetarian adds 6 yrs to your life.
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    Aug 20, 2011 5:01 PM GMT
    Celticmusl saidBecoming a vegetarian adds 6 yrs to your life.


    Six sad meatless years D:
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    Aug 20, 2011 7:49 PM GMT
    Correlation does not imply causation. I hope that the doctors behind this report know this and view this more as a fluffy PR story to get people to exercise. The causation could be reversed and extremely weak. Of course exercise is important for health, but a study of longevity impacts would have to be much more sophisticated than this one, controlling for many explanatory variables and using methods of regression analysis.
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    Aug 20, 2011 8:05 PM GMT
    Does this mean if the wing falls off my plane and I crash and burn, I'll spend the next 3 years in a coma before finally dying? icon_eek.gif
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    Aug 20, 2011 8:23 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidDoes this mean if the wing falls off my plane and I crash and burn, I'll spend the next 3 years in a coma before finally dying? icon_eek.gif


    lmfaooooo paul u always crack me up!!!

    LMAO.gif
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    Aug 20, 2011 10:31 PM GMT
    But also I think people ought to consider, especially those people who complain about the cost on the health care system of obese people who wind up dying in their 50s, that the healthy living which can lead to longevity can also lead to much increased medical costs overall because most medical expenses occur later in life.

    LittleDudeWithMuscles said...(not to mention feeling and looking better throughout those years). Sounds like an easy choice.


    [i]...vanity doesn't just take work. It doesn't come cheap. So people might consider planning for those costs when beauty fades.[/quote]

    Your premise is flawed. Actually, healthy people tend to do the opposite of what you're suggesting. That is, they "live long and die fast" (to quote one doctor I've interviewed on this very topic). They tend to go down "when it's their time," usually quickly, at an advanced age and with relatively few medical problems up until the very end.

    Obese people and smokers, despite the fact they live decades less, and because of their poor lifestyle choices, typically use the health care system the most.

    It is true that enormous amounts are spent on patients in the "last year of life," but that actually is a separate issue. . . because that "last year of life" applies to patients in their 40s and 50s as well as 90s. It's not necessarily an "old age" thing.

    If saving money on health care is your primary concern, the very best way to achieve that is to have a population of healthy people taking care of themselves and living longer lives unburdened by excessive interventions, surgeries, hospital stays and medications. This would, quite literally, save the system hundreds of billions of dollars a year.

    The worst way is basically what we have now. . .a very unhealthy population, skyrocketing obesity rates, diabetes increasing at epidemic rates. Much of this is preventable through diet and exercise. Obesity alone costs the system $300-$400 billion a year (and maybe more). Even taking these lower figures, that's $4 trillion in a single decade.

    Re: your "vanity" comment -- I'm not sure why a responsible concern for diet and exercise qualifies as vanity. That said, my experience is that people who let themselves go have by far the most vanity anyway. Somehow, most of them have convinced themselves, despite massive evidence to the contrary, that they still look good.

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    Aug 21, 2011 1:39 AM GMT
    luvitohateit said
    paulflexes saidDoes this mean if the wing falls off my plane and I crash and burn, I'll spend the next 3 years in a coma before finally dying? icon_eek.gif


    lmfaooooo paul u always crack me up!!!

    LMAO.gif
    I used to know a drag queen with a smile identical to that (but he was much thinner - like twig thin). icon_lol.gif
  • commoncoll

    Posts: 1222

    Aug 21, 2011 4:37 AM GMT
    Sartre saidCorrelation does not imply causation. I hope that the doctors behind this report know this and view this more as a fluffy PR story to get people to exercise. The causation could be reversed and extremely weak. Of course exercise is important for health, but a study of longevity impacts would have to be much more sophisticated than this one, controlling for many explanatory variables and using methods of regression analysis.

    This is also a study that is sensitive but not specific.
  • commoncoll

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    Aug 21, 2011 4:38 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidDoes this mean if the wing falls off my plane and I crash and burn, I'll spend the next 3 years in a coma before finally dying? icon_eek.gif

    No. You can always get a tattoo that says Do Not Resuscitate. Just have it notarized.