New Site Brazenly Trades Pirated E-Textbooks

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2011 4:39 PM GMT
    This might erm, be useful to someone. What I think is pretty exciting is the development of things like opensource textbooks which offers a somewhat more sustainable solution to the high prices of text books.

    http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/new-site-brazenly-trades-pirated-e-textbooks/32966

    Textbook pirates have struck again. Nearly three years after publishers shut down a large Web site devoted to illegally trading e-textbooks, a copycat site has sprung up—with its leaders arguing that it is operating overseas in a way that will be more difficult to stop.

    The new site, LibraryPirate, quietly started operating last year, but it began a public-relations blitz last week, sending letters to the editor to several news sites, including The Chronicle, in which it called on students to make digital scans of their printed textbooks and post them to the site for free online.

    Such online trading violates copyright law, but some people have apparently been adding pirated versions of e-textbooks to the site’s directory. The site now boasts 1,700 textbooks, organized and searchable. Downloading the textbooks requires a peer-to-peer system called BitTorrent, and the LibraryPirate site hosts a step-by-step guide to using it.

    Publishing officials say they heard about the site only after it was featured on a peer-to-peer file-sharing blog last week, and they are now are considering a response. “Steps will certainly be taken,” said Edward McCoyd, director of digital policy for the Association of American Publishers. “I’m sure publishers will seek to do something about this site.”

    The founder of LibraryPirate, who refused to give his name out of fear that legal action could be taken against him, said in an interview Monday that he hopes that a groundswell of textbook piracy will force publishers to bring down the prices of e-textbooks, which he sees as unfairly high. “I want to bring about permanent changes to the textbook industry,” he said. “The exorbitant price of a textbook shouldn’t hinder students’ ability to do well in a class,” he added. “I believe there is a moral objective at play here.”

    But Mr. McCoyd counters that the site’s action unfairly “penalizes the people who are producing the materials.” He said the LibraryPirate site exaggerates the cost of electronic textbooks, which he says are often 60 percent off the price of printed options. He pointed to a fact sheet on a Web site run by the publishing association, called Cost Effective Solutions for Student Success. It argues that the average student spends more each year on movie tickets than he does on textbooks.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 30, 2011 7:48 AM GMT
    Was a TA for a university professor who never required students to buy a book from the bookstore. His reason was that he authored a textbook and ended up getting just $1.00 from each book the bookstore sold for $100.00. The system definitely doesn't reward the original authors. Disruption is probably a good thing.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 30, 2011 8:32 AM GMT
    Yay! I'm telling EVERYONE!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 30, 2011 1:51 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/new-site-brazenly-trades-pirated-e-textbooks/32966

    Textbook pirates have struck again. Nearly three years after publishers shut down a large Web site devoted to illegally trading e-textbooks, a copycat site has sprung up—with its leaders arguing that it is operating overseas in a way that will be more difficult to stop.
    [...]
    Downloading the textbooks requires a peer-to-peer system called BitTorrent, and the LibraryPirate site hosts a step-by-step guide to using it.



    The website being overseas may or may not protect the website, but it does nothing to protect the users. If the copyright holders start monitoring the BitTorrent traffic, they will be able to track down the site's users unless they use an IP address that can't be traced back to the user.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 30, 2011 2:17 PM GMT
    GREAT!!!

    More power to it....This is what the internet was made for...

    The bookstores nickel and dime you for even a piece of candy...I am trying
    to better my self through education and these people look you straight in the eye and empty your wallet...

    Same thing with all the bookstores going out of business. I worked part-time @ Barnes and Noble and they used to charge, at least, a ten dollar profit on EVERYTHING....CD's, Books, Multi-media....
    Now, you can get all of those for free if you just google them....

    Thanks for the link Riddler78
  • kuroshiro

    Posts: 786

    Aug 31, 2011 9:50 PM GMT
    Wheee now I can get a free education on the side! Awesome!