Have you had a great paying job that you quit because the work was unfulfilling, and the people sucked?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 25, 2011 2:19 PM GMT
    I literally feel a piece of me dies everytime I step foot in this building. Anybody else felt/feels the same? And, did you quit? Find something better?
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    Aug 25, 2011 2:22 PM GMT
    Life is too short to work for money.
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    Aug 25, 2011 2:39 PM GMT
    When the time is right, find a new fulfilling job. In the meantime, play the game.
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    Aug 25, 2011 2:42 PM GMT
    I am looking and applying everyday. I dread Sunday nights.
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    Aug 25, 2011 2:45 PM GMT
    My job use to be fulfilling. But lately, not so much. I spend more time in company politics than I do on being creative and creating good work. I get paid good money, which is great. But in this economy there is no way I am leaving for something else. Once the economy comes back I will test the waters again.
  • zenmonkie

    Posts: 228

    Aug 25, 2011 2:46 PM GMT
    Start your exit plan immediately.
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    Aug 25, 2011 2:49 PM GMT
    No, but I did take advantage of the great paying job's tuition reimbursement program to study for a career change.
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    Aug 25, 2011 2:51 PM GMT
    Pretty much doing that now. I'm taking a pay cut to start the job I believe will jumpstart my career and leaving behind this mundane occupation. I'm not regretting it at all.
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    Aug 25, 2011 2:55 PM GMT
    Food for thought:
    http://healthland.time.com/2011/03/15/study-having-a-bad-job-is-worse-than-no-job-for-mental-health/

    Moving from unemployment to a job with high psychosocial quality was associated with improvements in mental health, the authors said. Meanwhile, the mental health of people in the least-satisfying jobs declined the most over time — and the worse the job, the more it affected workers' well-being.

    Unemployed people in the Australian study had a mental-health score (based on the five-item Mental Health Inventory, which measures depression, anxiety and positive well-being in the previous month) of 68.5. Employed people had an average score of 75.1. The researchers found that moving from unemployment to a good job raised workers' scores by 3.3 points, but taking a bad job led to a 5.6-point drop below average. That was worse than remaining unemployed, which led to decline of about one point.

    These findings underscore the importance of employment to a person's well-being. Rather than seeking any new job, the study suggests, people who are unemployed or stuck doing lousy work should seek new positions that offer more security, autonomy and a reasonable workload. But that's a lot easier said than done.
  • calibro

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    Aug 25, 2011 3:20 PM GMT
    yes, i left it
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    Aug 25, 2011 3:23 PM GMT
    gymrat100 saidI literally feel a piece of me dies everytime I step foot in this building. Anybody else felt/feels the same? And, did you quit? Find something better?



    When i quit my job I didn't feel as serious about it i mean no more money so it didn't comfortable b/c i couldn't do much with $$ but everytime i walked in there i got love from the people i was cool with and i haven't gotten a job since & the manager is why i quit but i guess i'm ok with her now , but i got an interview today, so just let God work his magic , relax all you want until you don't have to .
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    Aug 25, 2011 3:24 PM GMT
    TerraFirma saidWhen the time is right, find a new fulfilling job. In the meantime, play the game.


    +1, best plan
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Aug 25, 2011 3:28 PM GMT
    oh look... it's staurt icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Aug 25, 2011 3:42 PM GMT
    benz72 said
    TerraFirma saidWhen the time is right, find a new fulfilling job. In the meantime, play the game.


    +1, best plan


    Strongly disagree, unless you're one of those people who likes playing office politics and is not really affected by all the assholes you have to deal with. It sounds from your post like you're sick of all of that....

    I've been in the same situation myself, and I didn't leave until it became so overwhelming that I pretty much had a panic attack and ended up in the hospital. Not fun, and definitely not worth the paycheck in retrospect.

    Get out of there. The tuition reimbursement suggestion was great (if you know there's something else you'd like to do and can start studying for). Or maybe try going the freelance/contact route if you can do the line of work you do on your own.

    Bottom line is the paycheck (while great) is no substitute for good physical and mental health. I know it's tough to see that when you're making a lot of money, and it's easy to say, "I'm only doing this for the paycheck... I can last one more week, one more day because of the paycheck," but it will eventually catch up with you.
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    Aug 25, 2011 4:08 PM GMT
    Decide if you can make an exit plan, and how that that will take you. If you can manage that emotionally, do it. Many times people feel better about being in a soul sucking job if they have an action plan to move forward.

    If you feel that you will put your mental and emotional health in danger by being in the job, look at how you can leave earlier.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Aug 25, 2011 4:14 PM GMT
    matt45710 said

    If you feel that you will put your mental and emotional health in danger by being in the job, look at how you can leave earlier.


    Absolutely agree. My partner's best friend was employed by "friends" in Denver. He suffered some physical and mental issues and was hospitalized almost 2 years ago. Much better, but still can get confused on occasion.
    He has been "belittled" in the workplace, subordinated (how would you like to be at a Christmas party and every person there get a bonus handed to them except for you.....) One of the other employees is filing a lawsuit against the employer and wanted my partner's friend to join. He declined (prudently) at this time, but finally is making arrangements to get another job and tell his
    "friends" what to do.
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    Aug 25, 2011 5:29 PM GMT
    I work for myself and from home = no office politics icon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 25, 2011 6:39 PM GMT
    I have, but I waited until I had another job lined up.
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    Aug 25, 2011 7:23 PM GMT
    Just came back from an interview icon_smile.gif I would advise anyone whos unhappy to not leave till they have something lined up. I know, no shit, its a no brainer to not leave without having another lined up, but ud be surprised how many ive seen just up and leave...
  • misternick

    Posts: 234

    Aug 25, 2011 7:26 PM GMT
    My job doesn't pay much but I love it and I work with great people. Fortunately, I'm in a position to live on a thin paycheck. I know that's not an option for some people.
  • Springer70

    Posts: 65

    Aug 26, 2011 5:43 AM GMT
    I just recently left a job i didn't like (ok, got fired), but now i work for myself, and love it
    http://lifehacker.com/5834025/if-you-wouldnt-do-your-job-for-free-then-quit
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    Aug 26, 2011 6:14 AM GMT
    Yes. I moved from Baltimore to Sacramento for a six-figure job, but hated almost every second of it. I am not one to play "the game", so it just made it that much worse for me. There was not once ounce of reward from working there, with the exception of there being multiple gay/bi men working there, so I felt good being myself for the most part. I finally just had it and gave my notice and had to pay $6000 back in relocation, which I didn't care about. Then I spent 9 months wasting my savings away until i landed a job. In the end I learned alot about myself and who i really wanted to be as a professional, so I'm trying to draw any positives out of the experience that I can.