how long will a frozen chicken be "good" for?

  • rnch

    Posts: 11525

    Aug 25, 2011 6:42 PM GMT
    i found 2 frozen whole chickens in the back of my freezer since march of 2009.

    are they still good to defrost and cook?

    wadduathunk??


    icon_confused.gif
  • 1man

    Posts: 140

    Aug 25, 2011 7:07 PM GMT
    yikes! throw them out.
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    Aug 25, 2011 7:11 PM GMT
    Per the USDA, a whole frozen uncooked chicken is good for about a year if it's kept at or below 0 degrees Fahrenheit the whole time. Sorry, but those two are past their prime.

    Link:
    http://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/Chicken_from_Farm_To_Table/index.asp#26
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    Aug 25, 2011 7:17 PM GMT
    You sure are asking a lot of stupid questions today.
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    Aug 25, 2011 7:26 PM GMT
    i'd eat'em times are tough! icon_lol.gif
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    Aug 25, 2011 7:38 PM GMT
    Shawnathan said.., I can tell you that a whole chicken from the back of your freezer is still going to be 100 times better for you than any processed chicken you buy "fresh" today.
    this
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    Aug 25, 2011 7:59 PM GMT
    yourname2000 saidThe real danger (to me) happens if it thaws and is refrozen...that can give bacteria that are not killed by sub-zero temps a chance to reproduce to unacceptable levels.


    Interestingly enough, bacteria aren't killed by the freezing. They're just rendered incapable of reproduction until they reach their optimal temperature again, which for food-borne pathogens is between 40 and 140 F.
  • Hothouse

    Posts: 2204

    Aug 25, 2011 8:02 PM GMT
    I'm sure they're safe - just depends on how good a cook you are if they're edible.

    Grind 'em up and make chicken nuggets - yum, er, I mean, gag.

    I like to keep my chickens at room temperature, and in my bedroom so they're handy when I need them.
  • rnch

    Posts: 11525

    Aug 25, 2011 8:11 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidMaybe you should ask on google or yahoo.com.

    No one here seems to know or have a definite answer.


    i did, before posting here.

    nobody seems to have a definate answer there either.
  • metatextual

    Posts: 774

    Aug 25, 2011 8:18 PM GMT
    Go with yourname2000's solution: use the freezer chicken as you would a cheap cut of meat - in soup, chile, or as part of larger dish rather than the main.
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Aug 25, 2011 8:21 PM GMT
    Fire them out of a cannon if you have one.
  • mybud

    Posts: 11837

    Aug 25, 2011 8:25 PM GMT
    thaw them...if they pass the smell test....cook dem bitches......
  • cageym

    Posts: 99

    Aug 25, 2011 8:26 PM GMT
    Most chest freezers don't have automatic defrost and it is that regular partial thaw and refreezing that is most detrimental to the quality of the meat. I've had meat out of our chest freezer that is older than a year and it's been fine. It's more of a taste/appearance issue than a health issue. It's probably gonna be better than what meat just about anybody got in Dickens' London, for example.

  • rnch

    Posts: 11525

    Aug 25, 2011 9:04 PM GMT
    i defrosted one of the two hens....darn biotche smelled like a 3 day old cum fart.

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  • MrPapo317

    Posts: 515

    Aug 25, 2011 9:07 PM GMT
    JP85257 saidFire them out of a cannon if you have one.


    This!
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    Aug 25, 2011 9:28 PM GMT
    rnch saidi found 2 frozen whole chickens in the back of my freezer since march of 2009.

    are they still good to defrost and cook?

    wadduathunk??

    icon_confused.gif

    No, toss them. Even in a deep-freezer they would be potentially bad.

    In a frost-free freezer, like you have in a side-by-side, or a top or bottom refrigerator/freezer, very few animal or seafood products are good beyond about 6 months. Vegetables can last longer. This is because a frost-free freezer goes through a warming cycle, every few days or so, to melt the accumulated frost and prevent ice build up from frequently opening the door and letting moist air inside.

    But this means the food warms a little, and then refreezes when the frost-free warming cycle is over. This is what causes freezer burn and discoloration in meats, and also causes ice crystals to appear in things like ice cream.

    If you want to keep frozen foods longer use a deep freezer, and disable the frost-free feature if it has one (or better yet, save some money and buy a deep freezer without frost-free). But even then, at consistently below 0 degrees F, 1 year is the max recommended for animal products in most cases.
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    Aug 25, 2011 9:34 PM GMT
    It's not worth the risk. How much is it for two new chickens at the store?
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    Aug 25, 2011 9:35 PM GMT

    Timely Topic!!
    This morning, my roommate took 8 boneless, skinless chicken breasts out of the freezer and placed them outside in the sun to defrost (110 deg. for about 30 to 45 min.)
    He brought them in the house, they were still frozen together and in the center but the outside of the meat was getting soft. He cut up four and put the remaining four in a new bag and back in the freezer. They were still "almost" frozen...but I'm not sure it was a good idea.
    Any ideas??
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    Aug 25, 2011 9:38 PM GMT
    As an erstwhile chicken farmer, let me say that you could thaw them and then microwave them. Test taste them before serving. Freezer burn is very noticeable. icon_confused.gif

    I just wish I hadn't planted my chickens too deep this year....icon_wink.gif
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    Aug 25, 2011 9:40 PM GMT
    Friendsrbetter said
    Timely Topic!!
    This morning, my roommate took 8 boneless, skinless chicken breasts out of the freezer and placed them outside in the sun to defrost (110 deg. for about 30 to 45 min.)
    He brought them in the house, they were still frozen together and in the center but the outside of the meat was getting soft. He cut up four and put the remaining four in a new bag and back in the freezer. They were still "almost" frozen...but I'm not sure it was a good idea.
    Any ideas??

    Does the word salmonella hold any meaning for you?
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    Aug 26, 2011 12:07 AM GMT
    How well meat keeps is also a function of how it's packed. I once had a year old whole fryer from the farmers market in a plastic bag with a twist-tie, and after roasting it in the oven, it tasted horrible. It's like the air in the bag had oxidized the fat or something. On the other hand, some vacuum-packed duck breasts were just fine after a year.
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Aug 26, 2011 12:18 AM GMT
    Friendsrbetter said
    Timely Topic!!
    This morning, my roommate took 8 boneless, skinless chicken breasts out of the freezer and placed them outside in the sun to defrost (110 deg. for about 30 to 45 min.)
    He brought them in the house, they were still frozen together and in the center but the outside of the meat was getting soft. He cut up four and put the remaining four in a new bag and back in the freezer. They were still "almost" frozen...but I'm not sure it was a good idea.
    Any ideas??


    that's death chicken now. Definetely throw it out in a place where not even animals could eat it.
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    Aug 26, 2011 12:21 AM GMT
    omg. I can't stop laughing. This thread is so damn funny
  • rnch

    Posts: 11525

    Aug 26, 2011 11:51 AM GMT
    what's sad is that the thawed AND the frozen chickens are no longer in my trash can.


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    Aug 26, 2011 12:10 PM GMT
    rnch saidwhat's sad is that the thawed AND the frozen chickens are no longer in my trash can.

    icon_eek.gif

    Then somebody, or something, may be getting very sick shortly, because it's thoroughly bad now. Oddly, dogs seem less susceptible to illness from spoiled food, possibly because they evolved to rely more on scavenging rotten things than humans. Except of course for those humans who eat regularly at fast food places. icon_razz.gif