Update on my fitness - weight fluctuation question

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 25, 2011 10:43 PM GMT
    Hey Everyone,

    So I wanted to make a post about my progress so far in terms of weight loss and was hoping to get a little more feedback.

    So 3 1/2 weeks ago when I first started improving myself my weight fluctuated between 205-210 lbs. Now my weight fluctuates between 196-201 lbs. My eventual goal is 185. (I'm about 6'3 in height).

    My main question for right now is that even though my weight right now at it's lowest is around 196-7, it seems to only ever hit that low very briefly and then for the majority of the time I'm stuck at 200. I know that weight fluctuations are inevitable, but is there a way to help my body stay in the lower end of that fluctuation zone more often? I'd rather my body be at 196 for most of the day and then only occasionally fluctuate up to 200 instead of the other way around, which is the way it is now.


    Thanks!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 26, 2011 12:28 AM GMT
    Perhaps best to get fitness checks (via electrical impedance) to see what % of muscle, fat, water, etc. in your body at any given time. Just looking at those "weight" numbers might be misleading.
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    Aug 26, 2011 3:08 AM GMT
    In addition to what Terra said, it's also not best to be checking your weight several times a day. You'll give yourself a complex by doing that. Heck, even every day is not necessary, since weight fluctuates so much (as you know by now). If you must weigh yourself every day (I admit to doing this at times when I'm super paranoid about my weight) it's best to pick a certain time of day that you always weigh in at. Morning is the best time, after you've gone to the bathroom, because you're not full of food and water from the day. So, weigh yourself once in the morning (if you must do it every day), and try not to focus too much on that number. What you really are looking for is an average weight over the course of a period of time to make sure you're keeping on track; day to day can be deceiving.
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    Aug 26, 2011 3:16 AM GMT
    Agreed with the above 2 posts. It's normal to have weight fluctuations and 5 lb usually doesn't mean anything from an aesthetic perspective.

    But to achieve the goal you've conveyed, you need to lose another 5 lbs, then the top of your range will be 196, and the bottom will be 191.

    The scale should only be used to provide a general idea of where you stand. Unless you're a boxer or wrestler or competitive bodybuilder, you shouldn't be that strict with your weight control. And for those athletes above, it's only required at competition time.
  • MSUBioNerd

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    Aug 26, 2011 3:19 AM GMT
    I take a slightly different view from Chewy, here. Because weight fluctuates a lot, I think it's better to measure *more* often, not less. Essentially, you've got a system where there's a lot of measurement noise. Measure rarely, and the impact of the noise on each measurement will be large enough that you may think your weight is substantially different than it really is. Measure frequently, and the errors will tend to follow a balanced distribution, and thus a real slope will be easier to detect.

    That, however, requires you to have the self control to not freak out over an individually high number or rejoice over an individually low number, but merely treat it as a potentially poor data point when trying to detect an overall trend.
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    Aug 26, 2011 4:21 AM GMT
    MSUBioNerd saidI take a slightly different view from Chewy, here. Because weight fluctuates a lot, I think it's better to measure *more* often, not less. Essentially, you've got a system where there's a lot of measurement noise. Measure rarely, and the impact of the noise on each measurement will be large enough that you may think your weight is substantially different than it really is. Measure frequently, and the errors will tend to follow a balanced distribution, and thus a real slope will be easier to detect.

    That, however, requires you to have the self control to not freak out over an individually high number or rejoice over an individually low number, but merely treat it as a potentially poor data point when trying to detect an overall trend.


    An interesting tack to take. The way I view it is that you're more likely to get better control by taking one measurement a day at the same time, so as to limit all other factors as much as you can (I mean, not that that's much). So, measure in the morning at around the same time after you've gone to the bathroom; it's unlikely that any other time during the day you'll get conditions that are as close to the same day to day.

    But mostly it's that I don't think most people (certainly, not me) react well to weight fluctuations over the course of the day, tending to get a bit too caught up in that number.
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    Aug 26, 2011 4:55 AM GMT
    When I was losing weight, I would obsess over weight fluctuations. Don't. Either pick a day to weigh yourself, or if you must weigh yourself every morning take the average weight you get on the scale and average it out for the week. You'll get a better idea of how you're really doing in terms of getting to your goal.
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    Aug 26, 2011 7:22 AM GMT
    Or compromise... weigh yourself before the gym each time. Not once a week, but not 5 times a day
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    Aug 26, 2011 3:08 PM GMT
    MSUBioNerd saidI take a slightly different view from Chewy, here. Because weight fluctuates a lot, I think it's better to measure *more* often, not less. Essentially, you've got a system where there's a lot of measurement noise. Measure rarely, and the impact of the noise on each measurement will be large enough that you may think your weight is substantially different than it really is. Measure frequently, and the errors will tend to follow a balanced distribution, and thus a real slope will be easier to detect.


    Being a scientist, this sounds intuitively right to me. Although it is interesting I have never heard or read or thought of applying this to track one's weight gain/ loss.