Hey guys I just did my FIRST HDR photo!!!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 25, 2011 11:15 PM GMT
    I'm so excited I think I peed a little icon_biggrin.gif

    This is the original photo with only some light and contrast adjustments

    6080883110_6e9d6baf83_z.jpg


    This is the same image with the HDR treatment and a little spot removal (there was some dust on my lens icon_sad.gif (I made this using 3 images, one base line, and 2 virtual copies with exposures of -4 and +4 respectively)
    6081248190_d3f1740e1e_z.jpg


    And THIS is the final edit!
    6081248240_991e0eabf3_z.jpg


    What do you guys think?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 2:26 AM GMT
    Personally, HDR is not my style, so I prefer the original the most (it's really a nice shot; just needs a little fill light in a few areas).

    BUT, between the before and after HDR, I think the before HDR is more pleasing. I see you added fill light in the edit, which is good. But it looks like you also increased overall contrast and lost quite a bit of detail as a result. Also, I know it's popular with these HDR photos, but it's oversaturated. I also prefer the more "gold/blue" tone of the original HDR to the "orange/turquoise" of the edit. Did you play with color channels/balance there?

    Don't forget that the purpose of HDR is to regain detail you cannot get in a single exposure. Take a look at the buildings across the river in each image. Your first one actually has the most detail; you lost a lot to shadows in the HDR somehow. The same is true of the tree leaves in the top right. You did get some additional detail on the roof of the building left-center, but then in the edit it got covered with the contrast adjustment (or is it a vignette).

    Anyway, I'm not trying to be overly harsh, but provide some constructive criticism. You clearly have a good eye and like I said, I enjoy the original very much. Just try to keep some of the pointers in mind as you keep developing your style icon_smile.gif.

    Edit: I missed that you said the bracketing images were virtual. That's what's going to make the HDR not as effective. The virtual copies don't properly emulate (in fact, it's literally impossible) the actual changes in exposure that you would get if you actually took 3 separate images with the camera. I'm willing to bet this will solve half of your problems with loss of detail.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 2:28 AM GMT
    It looks frightening and plastic icon_eek.gif The original is lovely and natural.
  • kuroshiro

    Posts: 786

    Aug 26, 2011 2:31 AM GMT
    I really like the third one but you can't really tell if it's sunrise or sunset 0_o;
  • D300

    Posts: 86

    Aug 26, 2011 2:40 AM GMT
    Personally I like the first edit of the HDR more. The last one just seems too over saturated. But great photo and great job, keep up the good work! icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 3:20 AM GMT
    DoomsDayAlpaca saidWhat do you guys think?
    I think that shot is great! icon_biggrin.gif
    I also think the new HDR function in Photoshop is full of win.
    I've tried HDR manually, but never mastered it.
    With that new tool in Photoshop, I did an HDR of my boss' jet for a company ad, and it turned out great.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19133

    Aug 26, 2011 3:22 AM GMT
    I love color so the 3rd one is beautiful to me. Good job!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 3:23 AM GMT
    PS. That's not dust on your lens - It's dust on your sensor. Some newer cameras have automatic sensor cleaning in the menu. If yours doesn't, use an ear syringe to suck the dust off your sensor.
    mites-2.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 3:32 AM GMT
    Wish I was good at photography and this kind of stuff...maybe when I manage to find some free time I'll get into it. Great work man!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 3:34 AM GMT
    The -4/+4 exposure range may be why it looks so unnatural, although in certain artistic applications that can work. Here I think your goal was realism with snap. The sky is wonderful, although the sun looks like it's going nova.

    Experiment some more, and try a -2/+2 range next time.
  • petermalaka

    Posts: 158

    Aug 26, 2011 3:36 AM GMT
    i like the original much better

    just my opinion though
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 3:39 AM GMT
    I dont know if this is something to pay any mind to...but im half way on the way to being drunk...and the second looks the best to me. Doesnt give me a headache from the brightness, and is still appealing enough to be real.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 3:44 AM GMT
    I don't like the over saturated final photo. The first photo is nice, but just needs a bit of adjustments in the levels. I think you just went way too far.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 4:04 AM GMT
    I love the horrible saturation of the final edit. But I generally enjoy that kind of thing.

    However more 'professionally' i really like what yourname did.

    Great shot icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 4:13 AM GMT
    THANK YOU for the feed back guys! I know I went a little overboard for the 3rd one and professionally I don't think I would ever present it to someone unless they had a specific interest in "surrealism". I day dream a lot though so the bright colors and ridiculousness kind of appeal to me I guess lol. I love all 3 though :/ I think I might try a -2/+2 for my next photo.

    Yourname that's a really good composite, I now need to learn how to do that!

    Uciame, you weren't harsh at all, with out constructive criticism we don't get better.


    Background on the photo: This is a sunset right behind the Philadelphia Museum of art, there are a couple of gazebos on some rocky hills that over look the river and Boat House row (those houses you see in the background are row houses for the colleges)

    Philly cleans up nice right?
  • danisnotstr8

    Posts: 2579

    Aug 26, 2011 4:17 AM GMT
    Such a beautiful place! I used to life three blocks from there. Philly has its moments.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 4:29 AM GMT
    danisnotstr8 saidSuch a beautiful place! I used to life three blocks from there. Philly has its moments.


    Agreed, it is one of the most beautiful parts of the city (there are a few small hidden sitting areas on Ben franklin blvd, and in center city that a great for eating lunch in, they are surprisingly quite despite being in center city), I take my bike up that way and ride along boat house row and it's pretty relaxing....the hot guys running and rowing help too...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 26, 2011 4:30 AM GMT
    Art_Deco saidThe -4/+4 exposure range may be why it looks so unnatural, although in certain artistic applications that can work. Here I think your goal was realism with snap. The sky is wonderful, although the sun looks like it's going nova.

    Experiment some more, and try a -2/+2 range next time.


    That is most defiantly next on my agenda icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2011 11:28 AM GMT
    it's amazing, the first one is da best i reckon. thanks for sharing!!!
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Aug 27, 2011 11:51 AM GMT
    Thanks for sharing the shot, really awesome picture. I like aspects of both, the original and the HDR treatment. The rich colors of your
    "final edit" really gives the picture a richness that the original lacks. It almost looks like a print or an original art painting of some kind.
    Very interesting for sure. Great job!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2011 12:08 PM GMT
    WIKIPEDIA

    In image processing, computer graphics, and photography, high dynamic range imaging (HDRI or just HDR) is a set of techniques that allow a greater dynamic range of luminance between the lightest and darkest areas of an image than current standard digital imaging techniques or photographic methods. This wide dynamic range allows HDR images to more accurately represent the range of intensity levels found in real scenes, ranging from direct sunlight to faint starlight.[1]

    The two main sources of HDR imagery are computer renderings and merging of multiple photographs, the latter of which in turn are individually referred to as low-dynamic-range (LDR)[2] or standard-dynamic-range (SDR)[3] photographs.

    Tone-mapping techniques, which reduce overall contrast to facilitate display of HDR images on devices with lower dynamic range, can be applied to produce images with preserved or exaggerated local contrast for artistic effect.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2011 12:28 PM GMT
    the 2nd one is cooler, the 3rd one looks too anime