Eggs - Too much?

  • kuroshiro

    Posts: 786

    Aug 26, 2011 2:05 AM GMT
    This is something I've tried researching but simply cannot narrow down information on it. I love eggs. I don't know why but I'm on a kick with them. Here's the thing... I work overnights, so my eating schedule is all sorts of wonky at the moment. But, my breakfast (usually at 10-10:30 at night) consists of chicken or pork with a side of eggs and a small amount of oatmeal. I'll opt for either 3-4 eggs (yolk included).

    I'll work my full shift at work from 12am-8:30am, stop home and change, chug a protein shake then hit the gym for an hour/hour and a half before coming home. I'll have another thing of chicken and 3-4 eggs sans oatmeal and then collapse in bed.

    My question is, am I consuming too many eggs? I mean, I've eaten 3-4 a day everyday for the longest time with no noticeable fat addition, so it makes me wonder... will I be paying for this at some point? I just can't bring myself to buy boxed egg yolks again or throw the yolk away :/
  • waccamatt

    Posts: 1918

    Aug 26, 2011 3:01 AM GMT
    I only use egg beaters - eating a lot of real eggs will catch up with you eventually. They are fine in moderation - a few a week, but not say, a dozen a week.
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    Aug 26, 2011 3:40 AM GMT
    I'm a firm believer in eggs...always have been. Most days I'll just have 3-4 for breakfast, but occasionally I'll pig out and have as many as 12 in one sitting.
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    Aug 27, 2011 1:59 AM GMT
    Eating eggs is a great source of protein and the cholesterol in eggs has been found to be not so evil as had been touted for these past couple of decades.. Eat up.. I used to eat 8-12 per day and still eat 4-6 per day and have never had a problem with cholesterol levels or getting fat.

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    Aug 27, 2011 11:10 PM GMT
    I ate two dozen eggs per week for four years with no cholesterol issues whatsoever. Then I quit checking my cholesterol for several years, but continued the eggs. I also began eating more shrimp (also high in dietary cholesterol). Had my eyes checked, and the doctor said the blood vessels in my eyes were full of fatty cholesterol deposits. Had bloodwork, and despite vigorous, regular exercise and supposedly healthy eating (no red meat or pork for 20 years and no dairy), the LDL (bad) cholesterol was definitely way high. They wanted to put me on statin drugs, but I refused. I stopped whole eggs and shrimp completely, and within four months the LDL dropped to the perfectly normal range and the HDL went up (a good thing).

    I have absolutely no family history of high cholesterol and mine had previously been totally normal, so undoubtedly my diet caused the high LDL readings. Although they now claim eggs aren't that bad for you, my experience indicates you have to monitor your cholesterol if you consume them regularly.
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    Aug 27, 2011 11:32 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidEggs are wonderful.



    you said it, perfect description

    Im boiling a whole bunch in case I lose power during the hurricane
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    Aug 27, 2011 11:39 PM GMT
    i eat 5 egg whites (1 with the yoke) almost raw, i slightly cook it. i drink it after the gym for the protein but im not sure if this is bad for you. i only do it once or twice a week.
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    Aug 27, 2011 11:54 PM GMT
    I would love to get some sort of UV sterilizer that I could use for eggs to kill off any bacteria and then cook them just enough in order to eliminate the risk of acquiring a biotin deficiency. I would like to make them to a consistency of hollandaise sauce. [/quote]


    yeah same here, im always worried if the eggs have bacteria in it which is why i slightly cook it, but im still not sure if that would be enough to kill off the possible bacteria entirely
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    Aug 27, 2011 11:54 PM GMT
    i eat 5 whole eggs everyday (yolks included) for about a year now. I've wondered if this will negatively affect my health in the long run or not. They are the cage-free, brown eggs and I do a lot of cardio and my cholesterol levels are within normal limits.

    Now you have me wondering...
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    Aug 28, 2011 12:03 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    jtdashdub saidI would love to get some sort of UV sterilizer that I could use for eggs to kill off any bacteria and then cook them just enough in order to eliminate the risk of acquiring a biotin deficiency. I would like to make them to a consistency of hollandaise sauce.



    yeah same here, im always worried if the eggs have bacteria in it which is why i slightly cook it, but im still not sure if that would be enough to kill off the possible bacteria entirely


    From my understanding, the bacteria lives on the outer shell. So when handling eggs try not to get any of the egg in contract with the outer shell if possible. I wonder if washing eggs first would do anything. Can anyone comment? My guess is it's not that easy otherwise we'd all know just to wash our eggs first. [/quote]

    yeah ive heard this too, when i crack the eggs and even if the smallest bit of the shell goes in, i take it out...which can be hard to do at times under all the yolk.
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    Aug 28, 2011 12:11 AM GMT
    dcblue saidi eat 5 whole eggs everyday (yolks included) for about a year now. I've wondered if this will negatively affect my health in the long run or not. They are the cage-free, brown eggs and I do a lot of cardio and my cholesterol levels are within normal limits.

    Now you have me wondering...



    i think the only bad thing from having too many eggs is bad cholesterol, but if your cholesterol levels are normal then youre grand
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    Aug 28, 2011 12:12 AM GMT
    jtdashdub said
    dcblue saidi eat 5 whole eggs everyday (yolks included) for about a year now. I've wondered if this will negatively affect my health in the long run or not. They are the cage-free, brown eggs and I do a lot of cardio and my cholesterol levels are within normal limits.

    Now you have me wondering...



    i think the only bad thing from having too many eggs is bad cholesterol, but if your cholesterol levels are normal then youre grand


    Thanks, good to hear. Maybe I'll get it checked again soon just to be sure; it's been about 4 months.
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    Aug 29, 2011 5:45 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidMym hym...when I get egg shell in my mix I make sure to cook the eggs a bit more to hopefully kill off the bacteria.


    You could always wash the eggs in a bowl of water with a little household bleach added to it. To kill any bacteria on the outer shell..
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    Aug 29, 2011 7:50 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    beneful1 said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidMym hym...when I get egg shell in my mix I make sure to cook the eggs a bit more to hopefully kill off the bacteria.


    You could always wash the eggs in a bowl of water with a little household bleach added to it. To kill any bacteria on the outer shell..


    I never thought of that!

    Bad idea. I bad a bf go to the hospital from blood poisoning cause he accidentally added a little too much bleach.
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    Aug 29, 2011 7:04 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidReally? Hym...did he rinse them well?

    I thought of just soap and water as a rinse for eggs. After all that is usually sufficient to kill bacteria from our hands so thought it would be good enough for the outer shell of eggs.
    I really don't know. It could be just an isolated case.
    As for myself, I don't do hard boiled eggs at home. I buy them pre-boiled and shelled.
  • kuroshiro

    Posts: 786

    Aug 29, 2011 7:13 PM GMT
    Are Salmonella bacteria most likely to be found in the egg’s white or yolk?

    Bacteria, if they are present at all, are most likely to be in the white and will be unable to grow, mostly due to lack of nutrients. As the egg ages, however, the white thins and the yolk membrane weakens. This makes it possible for bacteria to reach the nutrient-dense yolk where they can grow over time if the egg is kept at warm temperatures. But, in a clean, uncracked, fresh shell egg, internal contamination occurs only rarely.

    Doesn’t the eggshell protect an egg from bacteria?

    Yes and no. The egg has many natural, built-in barriers to help prevent bacteria from entering and growing. These protect the egg on its way from the hen to your home. But, although it does help, the porous shell itself is not a foolproof bacterial barrier. For additional safety, government regulations require that eggs be carefully washed with special detergent and sanitized.

    Other protective barriers include the shell and yolk membranes and layers of the white which fight bacteria in several ways. The structure of the shell membranes helps prevent the passage of bacteria. The shell membranes also contain lysozyme, a substance that helps prevent bacterial infection. The yolk membrane separates the nutrient-rich yolk from the white.

    In addition to containing antibacterial compounds such as lysozyme, layers of the white discourage bacterial growth because they are alkaline, bind nutrients bacteria need and/or don’t provide nutrients in a form that bacteria can use. The thick white discourages the movement of bacteria. The last layer of white is composed of thick ropey strands which have little of the water that bacteria need but a high concentration of the white’s protective materials. This layer holds the yolk centered in the egg where it receives the maximum protection from all the other layers.

    Summary: It's not the eggs, it's your handling of them icon_biggrin.gif

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    Aug 29, 2011 7:20 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    beneful1 said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidMym hym...when I get egg shell in my mix I make sure to cook the eggs a bit more to hopefully kill off the bacteria.


    You could always wash the eggs in a bowl of water with a little household bleach added to it. To kill any bacteria on the outer shell..


    I never thought of that!



    you should be very careful doing this. the shell of the egg is quite porous
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    Aug 29, 2011 7:26 PM GMT
    Egg Farts!


    that is all.........
  • Montague

    Posts: 5205

    Aug 29, 2011 7:26 PM GMT
    funny-gifs-egg-man.gif
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    Aug 29, 2011 9:01 PM GMT
    The shell is somewhat porous but you're just giving them a quick bath in it and rinsing them off, not letting them soak away, so no bleach is going to enter the egg innards.. come on .
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    Aug 30, 2011 4:52 AM GMT
    If you cook your eggs fully, you shouldn't worry about bacteria. Bacteria aside, I hate the taste of undercooked/runny egg white, it is disgusting. That is why I make an omelette instead of sunny side up. I like the egg yolk undercooked, but if the egg yolk is undercooked the egg white is usually a bit undercooked too, and I hate that.