Dizziness after a swim?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 28, 2011 10:46 PM GMT
    Hey guys,

    Hope someone can help me out. I've noticed getting out of the pool sometimes, and always in the shower lately when I'm stretching my neck etc., after a swim, that I'm dizzy. The room is spinning when I tilt my head to stretch my neck and I'm a bit uncoordinated in general.

    Is this common at all?

    I'm thinking it's either from not breathing in a relaxed fashion and starving myself of air a bit, or that it has to do with water getting in my ears because I'm not using a swim cap.

    Does that make sense? Anyone else heard of this from other people or got suggestions? icon_sad.gif
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    Aug 28, 2011 11:43 PM GMT
    i sometimes get that after i swim and then take a cold shower, i think it could be the quick change of the body temperature
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    Aug 28, 2011 11:43 PM GMT
    Ah, I never thought about this. This is the answer I found:


    "...Because while swimming you are lying horizontally, you also do things like tumbleturns or if you change direction or stroke often the blood in your head ends up moving around (like when you stand up quickly) this can all make you dizzy. Also having water in your ears can effect your sense of balance which makes you dizzy, to help stop this wear a swimming cap and/or ear plugs."

    I imagine when I'm not relaxed going into a swim and I'm not breathing properly, that only makes the problem worse.
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    Aug 29, 2011 12:28 AM GMT
    try getting your ears cleaned, there could be major wax buildup which could cause a bit of unsteadiness
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    Aug 29, 2011 12:53 AM GMT
    Dizziness during and after swimming at the pool is related to the respiratory rate, the gas exchange and the gas supply to the brain. In other words it is the lacking of Carbon Dioxide at the brain because the higher respiratory rate! You should train before swimming and increase the amount of laps day by day.
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    Aug 29, 2011 2:48 AM GMT
    miami0010 saidDizziness during and after swimming at the pool is related to the respiratory rate, the gas exchange and the gas supply to the brain. In other words it is the lacking of Carbon Dioxide at the brain because the higher respiratory rate! You should train before swimming and increase the amount of laps day by day.


    You really shouldn't be depriving yourself of CO2 if you are swimming with proper technique. Yes, you aren't necessarily breathing all the time, but swimming is an aerobic activity. Unless you are getting up and doing sprints from the blocks all practice long your body shouldn't be depleting your oxygen levels that significantly.

    OP make sure you are drinking a lot of water while swimming. I have gotten dizzy from dehydration after a few practices before.
  • barriehomeboy

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    Aug 29, 2011 2:50 AM GMT
    See a doctor. You need medical advice, not gay chat monkey advice. Please!
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    Aug 29, 2011 5:34 AM GMT
    Maybe your blood pressure is low. Some people just do have a low blood pressure by nature. When they lie down and stand up again, it might cause them to get dizzy.
    So when you swim and get out of the water it could basically be the same thing (just like you've posted it before).

    Also, the temperature is a factor.

    miami0010 saidDizziness during and after swimming at the pool is related to the respiratory rate, the gas exchange and the gas supply to the brain. In other words it is the lacking of Carbon Dioxide at the brain because the higher respiratory rate! You should train before swimming and increase the amount of laps day by day.

    The lack of carbon dioxide doesn't cause you to get dizzy, unless it's a severe hypocapnia. Which would be the case if he was hyperventilating in a panic attack. But normal fast breathing after sports normally doesn't have that effect.
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    Aug 30, 2011 3:42 PM GMT
    Yeah I'm thinking it's just from being horizontal while getting such a hard workout. I'm not too alarmed but wanted to see if people could relate... one of my friends also suggested a good swimcap that will cover my ears because water in ears can cause people some additional problems.

    I used to train pretty hard in track and cross country, and I know the lightheadedness that comes after a tough workout, but the difference with running is that you're vertical/upright the entire time. I guess it's just an adjustment.

  • Lincsbear

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    Aug 30, 2011 3:51 PM GMT
    What you suggest sounds likely,but you need to see a doctor really.
  • MSUBioNerd

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    Aug 30, 2011 3:55 PM GMT
    Again, I'd recommend a doctor. But for me, dizziness right after swimming is typically a blood sugar crash. I don't notice some of the other warning of a blood sugar crash when I'm swimming, because it's harder to notice a cold sweat when you're immersed in water, and blurring of the edges of my vision is standard when I'm not wearing glasses, etc.
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    Aug 30, 2011 4:05 PM GMT
    I have this same problem when I swim. I don't swim very often... only when I'm training for a race.

    I was told be a physiologist that it could be a number of things, but his first suggestion was to eat something before swimming. So I started eating high-energy foods on my way to the pool (bananas, oranges, nuts, energy bars, etc) and that pretty much resolved the dizziness.
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    Aug 30, 2011 7:46 PM GMT
    I ate a half a banana on the way to the pool today. I wasn't as dizzy. I also gave myself some time to re-adjust to being on dry land after my swim.

    I still felt a big foggy/light-headed though. I'll see if it continues...

    Would sinuses have anything to do with it? Maybe I need to invest in a neti-pot lol
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 30, 2011 7:51 PM GMT
    cervicogenic dizziness go to a chiropractor
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 30, 2011 10:55 PM GMT
    BH_nexus saidcervicogenic dizziness go to a chiropractor


    Funny you say that because I have mad tension in my trapezius muscles and neck. Probably because that's where I hold all my stress/tension and my physiotherapist said it's probably compensating since I have had a rotator cuff injury.

    I'm going to go the route of massage though, not to a chiropractor.
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    Aug 30, 2011 11:17 PM GMT
    barriehomeboy saidSee a doctor. You need medical advice, not gay chat monkey advice. Please!
    Don't play! How is your heart? Athletes with enlarged hearts sometimes can go into ventricular tachycardia [heart beat far too rapid]. The ventricles pump too fast to supply the atria with an adequate oxygen and blood supply. The signs are extremely low blood pressure and light-headedness/dizziness. A doctor can put your mind at ease better than any one here.
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    Aug 30, 2011 11:38 PM GMT
    My heart is perfectly fine... never had an issue with it in my life. It's really not that severe... I'm really not worried. It's more just a bit puzzling and annoying.

    Do any swimmers here use ear plugs? Do many competitive or lane swimmers use them? I never seem to notice but I imagine that would help, if this has anything to do with my inner ear. Or at least a swim cap covering my ears.
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    Aug 30, 2011 11:52 PM GMT
    Hmmmm... I've been reading online more about this and it really does seem like there are lots of people out there who get dizzy from swim workouts (especially with flip-turns) if they're not wearing ear plugs.

    I'm going to buy ear plugs tomorrow and see how that helps me icon_smile.gif
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    Aug 31, 2011 12:18 AM GMT
    Please see a doctor.

    Anything that has to do with dizziness and being in water needs to be treated with caution. The risk of a sudden worsening leading to incapacitation in the water is too high.

    Take care.
  • DenveRyk

    Posts: 167

    Aug 31, 2011 12:38 AM GMT
    I always wear ear plugs when I'm swimming. Don't know about the dizziness, but I found that without the plugs, I was getting ear infections. Started using plugs and no more problems. Your problem might be different, but I think using plugs is smart--even though pool water is treated, still the thought of countless unknown people using the same water--just feels like plugs and goggles both are a great idea for health sake!! Good luck and hope the dizziness isn't a major problem!
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    Aug 31, 2011 1:07 AM GMT
    Wow I'm an anxious person with regards to health issues, but some of you are just downright alarmist! I've been foggy/lightheaded all day today after my swim and slightly dizzy. It's not like I'm incredibly dizzy and vomiting or anything.

    I'll track it and see how I feel as I continue to swim and learn flip turns while using ear plugs and if it continues to be a problem, or worsens, by all means of course I'll see a doctor! icon_smile.gif
  • Plazma1

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    Sep 09, 2011 7:32 PM GMT
    I was an instructor and lifeguard. If it bothers you check it out. But for the most part I've been told the same thing - that this has to do with your circulation. It is the same effect that people speak of when they get older: if they wake up and stand up immediately the blood rushes with gravity and it takes a few moments of dizziness before you regain your balance.

    I wouldn't be worried as this is quite common. The good part is that if you keep swimming you will increase the strength of your circulatory system and this should gradually happen less and less.
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    Sep 13, 2011 4:40 PM GMT
    Perhaps you should see a cardiologist or ENT specialist.

    There are a lot of things that can make a person dizzy, many of which were covered by people in this thread. There may be nothing wrong, which is most likely the case. Low blood pressure is not always a concern, I am consistently around 90/50, and I'm generally fine. I had vasovagal syndrome as a kid, and have some blood sugar issues if I drink, but overall ok.

    Low blood pressure and low blood sugar can cause extensive dizziness and passing out. Sometimes you may feel dizzy when you go to the bathroom (drinking a Sprite or Ginger Ale helps). This can be more problematic if you drink alcohol at night (even moderate amounts) and exercise the next morning.

    Other problems, some sort of vasovagal problem, vertigo, clogged Eustachian tubes (or inner ear fluids), irregular hear beat, vasoconstriction due to changes in temperature (like getting out of a pool) or changes in blood calcium concentration (often supplements are a major cause of problems)

    If you take supplements for exercise, be sure to check what you are taking, and ask a doctor if there may be any side effects. Taking things like L-argenine, drinking lots of caffeine, and taking decongestants can cause major internal problems. L-argenine is a vasodilator, while the others are vasoconstrictors. Also, if you take Ritalin or a derivative of Ritalin, they are vasodilators.

    Cheers,

    Matt

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    Sep 13, 2011 4:46 PM GMT
    If you arent a regular swimmer you will find yourself having a harder time recovering after a workout. Always have water with you because you are sweating more then you think. I dont eat before just because it makes me feel like i am going to be sick during my workout but after make sure you are getting something to eat within 30mins of your workout. Also not being use to flip turns over and over and also if you are doing a lot of breath control and hypoxic sets that will cause it too.
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    Sep 13, 2011 5:07 PM GMT
    Yeah it seems to be that I wasn't relaxed in the water... I was tense, which affected my breathing. Not to mention that I would hop out of the pool and quickly go to the showers and expect to be re-balanced.

    Yesterday I had a really really intense workout and there was no dizziness after, so I think it's just a transient problem that occurs especially when I stand up immediately after a swim and then tilt my head to stretch out my neck/trapezius muscles.

    Thanks for the help everyone icon_smile.gif.

    Now my next question... what does everyone do in terms of eating before a swim workout? I'm thinking of following the same guidelines I used to with my track practices, which was to eat something light like a banana an hour before (but within an hour of practice).

    If I have an early swim practice at 7:30am, I feel like waking up, walking all the way to campus and then doing an hour and a half of swimming is too much to do without some energy/food put into my body.

    Any advice?