Job relocation question

  • swimbikerun

    Posts: 2835

    May 08, 2008 6:45 PM GMT
    Would you move to a new city for a job?
    Have you done so?
    What have your experiences been?
    Did you move to the city first and then find a job or the other way around?
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    May 08, 2008 6:49 PM GMT
    Just did. icon_smile.gif
  • ShawnTX

    Posts: 2484

    May 08, 2008 6:56 PM GMT
    I will be moving to a new city for a job at the end of the month.

    I've done it once before, I moved here for a job. The mistake I made is I worked too much, easily 12-14 hour days and a few hours on my days off, so the friendships I developed only came out of my work environment. I didn't give myself the opportunity to meet people in other venues for the first few years.
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    May 08, 2008 7:00 PM GMT
    swimbikerun saidWould you move to a new city for a job?
    Have you done so?
    What have your experiences been?
    Did you move to the city first and then find a job or the other way around?


    I haven't yet, but I did relocate to where I'm now with my now former partner. It was hard for the 2 of us, but we got the hang of it after a few months.

    I said 'yet' before because I'm going to be moving back to Arizona where I'll be attending a culinary institute. After that, I'm concidering relocating to a hot spot in the culinary industry so I can learn to be my best from the best, if I'm lucky.

    But if your the adventurous type and wouldn't mind trying new things, along with the benefits of a new job than I recommend it. Just be aware that there will be rough spots along the way ;)
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    May 08, 2008 7:03 PM GMT
    I hope to be moving to Portland in the next year or two for a new job. The anticipation is killing me.
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    May 08, 2008 7:04 PM GMT
    swimbikerun saidWould you move to a new city for a job?
    Have you done so?
    What have your experiences been?
    Did you move to the city first and then find a job or the other way around?


    Yes.

    Yes, a few times.

    My experiences have been very good; But then I like to explore new and exciting things, places, people.

    I seem to have always moved to a new city when opportunities opened up in that city for me.

    Moved away from home to enter the Service.
    Moved to Boston to finish my education.
    Moved to Burlington to start a business because it was cheaper there than in Boston.
    Moved to London after I met my partner and my company merged with a UK company.

    Future plans may include moving to either NYC or Sydney in the next couple of years in order to oversee company expansion in those areas.

    It also probably is easier for me because I have few family ties; my partner Iain however is very close to his family, and that may dictate what we do.
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    May 08, 2008 7:07 PM GMT
    I moved to San Diego for the city and then searched for a job. The market here is kind of difficult for newbies so I ended up with the ass crack early shift at a bookstore making min. wage. That was tough because housing is expensive. It took several years (and a BORING bank job), but I eventually found a great job in my line of work (and then some). I met the love of my life, and we've been together nearly five years (yay!). We live by the beach (yay!). Though my firs few years here were definitely a struggle, I'm SO glad I made the move.
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    May 08, 2008 7:11 PM GMT
    I've moved twice for work, in 1999 and in 2001.

    In both cases, I had the job first. And in both cases I didn't have much choice (either move or change careers). I lucked-out both times in that I moved to a nice location.

    In my second move, I bought a home in the suburbs (really the ex-urbs). Living away from a city has made it more difficult for me to establish a social network.

    I would relocate again for the right job, but I'm less inclined to move now than I was 10 years ago. Good friendships are hard to come by, so the job offer would have to be really attractive for me to give up my social network.
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    May 08, 2008 7:22 PM GMT
    I relocated from Houston to Philadelphia, back to Houston and then to Dallas.
    The Houston to Philly relo was a total culture shock...I was there for two years and not a day went by where I didn't say to myself, "I can't believe I live here".
    Professionally, it was the best thing I could have done for my career (at the time), so I had no regrets.
    I loved living in the Northeast and grew quite fond of Phildelphia and its people...the climate took getting use to and things were more expensive, plus I had to pay a State Income tax and a City wage tax, etc..etc...so do your homework before you accept that big pay raise and move....most of my increase was eaten up by taxes and the cost of living was higher so my actual standard of living went down even though I was making more and took on a greater amount of responsibility @ work.
    The move from Houston to Dallas wasn't so stressful, though Dallas is quite different from Houston, despite being in the same State...career wise it was a disaster, but personally, its been great.

  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    May 08, 2008 7:25 PM GMT
    I have and will continue to do so. I've moved twice for grad schools, I'll almost certainly do so again when I get a postdoc, and then again when I (hopefully) get a faculty position.

    Than again, there's not a lot of option of not moving in order to get a job in academia.
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    May 08, 2008 7:29 PM GMT
    Nope nope. icon_biggrin.gif

    boiwunderkind123 said[quote]I said 'yet' before because I'm going to be moving back to Arizona where I'll be attending a culinary institute. After that, I'm concidering relocating to a hot spot in the culinary industry so I can learn to be my best from the best, if I'm lucky.


    Scottsdale Culinary Institute or Art Institute? I was going to take the baking one at AI.. 16k for an AAS, wtf is that? So, I'm going to be driving down to the Fort Huachuca campus instead. Community college ftw?

    Would be awesome to get an apprenticeship, but ain't got no bakers around here! It's the pits.
  • SoDakGuy

    Posts: 1862

    May 08, 2008 7:57 PM GMT
    Would you move to a new city for a job? - doing that right now! I'm crossing my fingers and split ends!

    Have you done so? - this summer!

    What have your experiences been? - don't know yet, but I'm excited!!!

    Did you move to the city first and then find a job or the other way around? - When I moved here the first time, it was for a boy. Second time to Minneapolis, it was for a job.
  • swimbikerun

    Posts: 2835

    May 08, 2008 8:03 PM GMT
    Wow! Thanks for all the great responses!
    Basically, I'd like to take my career in a new direction and I'm considering relocating to open my options.
    Though they've already asked if I plan on moving there anyway and some employers seem skittish about hiring somebody who doesn't already live there.
    I just wouldn't feel comfortable moving to a new city without a job but perhaps I should keep that open as an option as well.
    It seems like from the responses so far, it might be a gamble worth taking.
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    May 08, 2008 8:11 PM GMT
    I have... it turned out to be okay. My partner went with me too... it was hardest on him, but he did great.
  • EricLA

    Posts: 3461

    May 08, 2008 11:14 PM GMT
    I did. I was working for a non-profit at the time and the executive director asked if I wanted to move from Los Angeles to become her assistant out of the NYC office. I'd been in a bit of a run, but big changes can be daunting. I've also lived in California almost my entire life, so I'd never lived through a "real" winter. But, I accepted the job knowing that it would probably be something I'd try for a few years. The experience was mixed. The job for the first couple of years was great. I learned a lot working for the executive director, and she was a great boss. But, I married the job and didn't get out to explore NY as much as I intended to. I'm a bit shy to begin with, so I never made many friends outside of work. I also gave up working out during this time, which was probably my biggest mistake. I was still paying dirt cheap for 24 Hour Fitness ($10/month), but they had no NY locations. I didn't want to spend $80+ or more a month on a new gym membership I might only have a couple of years. Still, I think the positives outweighed the negatives until my boss stepped down and the new boss came in. I lasted a year, and then was pretty burned out and the weather really bummed me out. I lasted 3 1/2 years. Now I'm back in L.A., where I LOVE the weather. I'm glad I did NYC, but L.A. is more my speed. But you never know until you give it a try. Given that I was in a rut before I left, I think it was good that I shook things up and had a change of perspective. Made me appreciate L.A. more when I came back.
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    May 09, 2008 4:08 AM GMT
    In 1997 I decided I needed a change. It was a Wednesday. I thought to myself, damn I hate my job and I am tired of Utah. I went home and talked to my wife (at the time) and told her how I was feeling. She agreed with me.

    So on Friday I quit my job, Monday I flew to Scottsdale and bought a new home. Entered Real Estate School and started over.

    It's not like a job transfer, just more of a life change. And I have no regrets.
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    May 09, 2008 4:28 AM GMT
    hobronto saidJust did. icon_smile.gif

    Aw, we musta left just as you arrived in Austin. You'll love it there - such a great town.

    Anyway, swim, I've lived in several cities in the west and southwest, and for the most part, I found the city first and the job followed. That wasn't the case, though, when I moved to Texas (which I swore I would never do). Eight years later, I'm still here, although the move from Austin to Houston might as well have been across state lines. I love the adventure of discovering new cities, so I'd say my experiences have mostly been very positive.

    Ideally: I'd live in Seattle in July, Denver the rest of the summer, San Diego in the winter and Texas in the spring and fall.
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    May 09, 2008 4:42 AM GMT
    I'm in a similar boat Swim. It seems there's more opportunity in other cities for the field I want to get into. I have no advice but I wish you good luck. We'll find our ways.
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    May 09, 2008 4:45 AM GMT
    QUOTE AUTHOR GOES HEREI hope to be moving to Portland in the next year or two for a new job. The anticipation is killing me


    Portland Oregon, I'm assuming, which is a great city and very liberal/gay tolerant but with lots going on asside to just that.

    But yes, I'd move, and have moved, though not in a while, and honestly now feel the need to move again. I guess you have to weigh a number of things. I've never moved for just a job, but have for education and training, and moved because the family did. But then I don't necessarily feel tied to one place. I think a move can be good or bad depeding what is going on, and there are moves I was into and ones I wasn't into depending on the circumstances.
  • Starboard

    Posts: 242

    May 09, 2008 4:45 AM GMT
    From an employer's perspective, there are always concerns about hiring a relo candidate. First off, there is the reliability issue. What if after accepting the offer the relo becomes more complicated or expensive than you had anticipated? What if you realize after relocating that you do not like you're new home, being away from friends/family, etc? How much time would you need to relocate and get established? Would you expect the employer to offer a relo package?

    I recommend providing as many answers to these questions/concerns up front during the application process. If you are applying for a job in a different city, provide details to explain why you would consider relocating (do you have family/friends in the area, have you spent time in the area before?). I think that any details that you can provide to explain why (aside from the professional opportunity) you are willing to move yourself and your life to a new city. A relo has an impact on not just your career, but your personal life as well -- employers realize this and want to be assured that you are making an informed decision.

    If you are not expecting a relo package, definitely mention that up front. I would also try and provide an estimate for how soon you could potentially move. If you are really serious about the position, do a little research about apartments, local real estate, etc. Show your potential employer that you are ready and willing to move for the right opportunity according to their timeline.

    If you are expecting a relo package, prepare a ballpark estimate of what you would expect to receive (closing costs on an existing residence, sign-on bonus, home-finding trip including transportation and hotel/meals, set-up allowance + paid time off, relocation agency fees, special handling for pets/vehicles, etc.).

    A standard relo can cost from 10k to more than 40k depending on distance and the amount/type of furnishings to be moved.

    Relos can be exciting but also come with a certain amount of risk. Whatever you can do to diminish the potential risks up front will help you to become a successful candidate.






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    May 09, 2008 5:02 AM GMT
    ruck_us saidIdeally: I'd live in Seattle in July, Denver the rest of the summer, San Diego in the winter and Texas in the spring and fall.
    icon_eek.gif San Diego in the winter??? please visit us in July through October. That is the most beautiful time here in coastal San Diego. Better yet, visit at the end of July around pride: It's sunny and mild and great outdoors/beach weather. I'll leave the lights on for ya!