Weight gain/loss and mood changes

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    Sep 01, 2011 9:12 PM GMT
    Has anyone else who's lost or gained a significant amount of weight noticed any sort of mood shifts or personality changes?

    I feel more easily frustrated and pissed these days, am harsher and more severe with my fitness regiments, fat people bother me a lot more than they used to (it's a terrible feeling, I shouldn't feel that way...), I feel guilty on the days I neglect to exercise and am much more fickle with food (some days I hardly eat at all, other days I'm voracious). I also have a tendency to feel cold sometimes.

    Yet 80 pounds weight loss later, I get so many compliments, and a sense of victory overcomes me knowing I can fit well in 31" waist jeans. But I'm still hovering probably around 20% body fat, so I can't stop now. Some days, it's enough that I wish I'd just starve; of course, I won't do that knowing that it is counterproductive and slows down metabolism. I do eat generally fine, get my vitamins and minerals, eat plenty of fiber, and drink lots of water. icon_neutral.gif But I seriously feel like shit. Is this normal?
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    Sep 01, 2011 9:33 PM GMT
    In the last two years I went on a weight loss program which included a complete change of eating habits, going out for a run, floor exercises and visiting the gym.
    I have lost about 70lbs.
    But I was told that I tend to be more moody than before, and less patient. I think she may have a point.
    My problem is a raging appetite combined with knowing that if I derail in what I eat, my weight will start going back up. Therefore I find it a constant battle to keep my present weight stabilised. It means missing out of niceties like chocolate, cake, ice creams and other mouth-watering foods.
    This could be the reason behind my bouts of moodiness.
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    Sep 01, 2011 10:31 PM GMT
    I find losing weight makes me tired and grumpy unless I'm actually moving at the time. When I sit down, the only thing that keeps me from committing multiple homicides every time someone within ear shot opens their mouth is a combination of extreme fatigue and resulting lack of enthusiasm. The upside, I feel a lot less depressed.
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    Sep 01, 2011 10:56 PM GMT
    Trollileo said
    The_Guerrilla_Sodomite saidI find losing weight makes me tired and grumpy unless I'm actually moving at the time. When I sit down, the only thing that keeps me from committing multiple homicides every time someone within ear shot opens their mouth is a combination of extreme fatigue and resulting lack of enthusiasm. The upside, I feel a lot less depressed.
    Oh my god. I know exactly how you feel. My friends didn't contact me all fucking summer except for this one guy who I met online and I told him if it hadn't been for him I would have killed a person or 4. (Exact text, btw.)

    Even last night I threw the biggest bitch fit in two years. Right after I finished my run, one of my roommates asked me to clean the oven, because I made a mess while I was baking HIS fucking dinner. They haven't done anything in the kitchen in like 3 weeks and so I was like "sure, no fucking problem" and I took my cup of water and threw it on the ground in front of him and just walked into the kitchen. I ignored their existence for the rest of the night. I love headphones.


    My triggers are even more petty.

    I'm usually writing and/or on here while watching movies with my roomies. After the about the 2nd or 3rd bottle of wine each, they become analytical and attempt to drunkenly deconstruct the movie. I start grinding my teeth because a) they are loud and drunk b) they shouldn't be trying to intellectualize anything in that state and c) in my opinion, they often misinterpret what they just saw. I usually just try and tune them out with one eye twitching in bottled up rage. They do however offer the occasional release for me when I can snarl, "No, that happened in a movie we watched last week, and for that matter, that actor wasn't even in this one". At which point they look at me like I am crazy then continue hooting and jibbering to each other until they lose language capability and shuffle off to their rooms.

    When I'm not in deep purple level ketosis, I actually find their antics endlessly entertaining. icon_lol.gif
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Sep 01, 2011 11:06 PM GMT
    The only time I have mood swings are when I stop smoking or quit drinking caffeine.....OR not being fucked regularly.
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    Sep 02, 2011 12:46 AM GMT
    I lost 230 lbs and have kept it off.....my energy levels, attitude, mood everything is MUCH better. I am more empathic toward heavy people, but very intolerant of complaining by those out of shape and obese as they eat a bag of chips, cookies, ice cream, and crap foods......
    if you are more moody, check your blood sugar and add in a few more complex carbs...
    I'm sure you've heard the phrase "fat and happy". Well, it's not just folklore. The same carbs that make you fat (and contribute to diabetes and other problems) also make you happy. It's simple science: Carbs allow more of the amino acid L-tryptophan to penetrate your brain. The L-tryptophan triggers your brain to make more serotonin and the serotonin makes you feel happier. But if you're following a low-carb diet, it's possible that not enough L-tryptophan will penetrate your brain and you could wind up depressed.

    The solution could be as simple as taking supplemental tryptophan so there's more of it to penetrate the brain. I suggest either 1,500mg twice daily or, if that causes drowsiness (which is rare but possible), all 3,000mg can be taken at bedtime. Just make sure not to take it when you're eating protein. It's best to take tryptophan with whatever small amount of carbohydrates you do eat.
    Good luck.icon_biggrin.gif