TSA's Trusted Traveler Program

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 04, 2011 3:41 PM GMT
    This is several weeks old, but I wanted to give a heads up and also see if any of you have later information. The program will start as a pilot, open to US Citizens, which will provide shorter lines, ability to keep your computer in your bag even if the bag is not "TSA Friendly".
    http://www.cnn.com/2011/TRAVEL/07/14/tsa.trusted.traveler/index.html

    It will initially be open to elite fliers of a couple of airlines only at selected airports. But it will also be immediately open to members of other trusted programs, such as Global Entry.
    https://goes-app.cbp.dhs.gov/
    For Global Entry, there is a non-refundable application fee of $100, although American Express will refund that to certain card holders. You need to be fingerprinted and provide information about your residence, employment, past international travel, etc. Global Entry speeds entry to the US. Instead of waiting in line, you go to a kiosk, place your thumb against a glass panel, answer a few questions, then get a receipt that you show as you bypass the lines. If the kiosks are out of order, you can just walk to the head of a line. They say if you are not comfortable doing that, just find an agent and they will escort you to the front of the line.
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    Sep 04, 2011 3:46 PM GMT
    socalfitness saidThis is several weeks old, but I wanted to give a heads up and also see if any of you have later information. The program will start as a pilot, open to US Citizens, which will provide shorter lines, ability to keep your computer in your bag even if the bag is not "TSA Friendly".
    http://www.cnn.com/2011/TRAVEL/07/14/tsa.trusted.traveler/index.html

    It will initially be open to elite fliers of a couple of airlines only at selected airports. But it will also be immediately open to members of other trusted programs, such as Global Entry.
    https://goes-app.cbp.dhs.gov/
    There is a non-refundable application fee of $100, although American Express will refund that to certain card holders.


    As a Canadian, there is also the NEXUS program which frankly, is absolutely amazing and improves the travel experience multifold (transforming what can be an hour of waiting in lines to 5-10 minutes of pressing a few buttons). For $50 bucks, it is part of the trusted traveler program that expedites moving through US customs - and I often get through faster than pilots and crew. In international airports, you get access to the same line crew use.

    You have to give up biometric information but I figure it's a small price to pay for the convenience - especially if you travel a lot, I figure you've already given up most of this information without my consent.
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    Sep 04, 2011 3:48 PM GMT
    Good point - there is a link to NEXUS from the second link I provided.
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    Sep 04, 2011 4:59 PM GMT
    I'd do it in a heartbeat. Even though I'm a libertarian type, slightly distrustful of the government, and very much a defender of individual rights and liberties.

    I remember the days before 911 when you could pretty much breeze through the airport with little trouble and not much of a line to wait in. I remember showing up to the airport 10 or 15 minutes before a flight and having no trouble making the flight.

    I know I have no intention of blowing up a plane, or carrying a gun or knife on board. But yeah, the government might need more than my word on it. So be it.
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Sep 04, 2011 5:49 PM GMT
    I've got a NEXUS card, but I don't think I fly often enough for this program to be terribly worthwhile for me. The big advantage of the NEXUS pass for me, at least, is in the Port Huron/Sarnia crossing, where there's a dedicated lane on the bridge itself for the NEXUS/Fast Pass/etc holders, often cutting an hour or so from the wait. I'm not sure how much of a wait I'd avoid by using this program, and it's not worth $100 to me to not have to remove my shoes and take my laptop out of the bag.

    Although there's also a dedicated lane at customs itself for us NEXUS people, it seems about half the time it's staffed by someone who doesn't really grasp that this is a lane for people who know the rules and have had background checks run, and thus they still ask 12 or so questions about the purpose and duration of the visit, where we were born, where we live...
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    Sep 04, 2011 7:08 PM GMT
    MSUBioNerd saidI've got a NEXUS card, but I don't think I fly often enough for this program to be terribly worthwhile for me. The big advantage of the NEXUS pass for me, at least, is in the Port Huron/Sarnia crossing, where there's a dedicated lane on the bridge itself for the NEXUS/Fast Pass/etc holders, often cutting an hour or so from the wait. I'm not sure how much of a wait I'd avoid by using this program, and it's not worth $100 to me to not have to remove my shoes and take my laptop out of the bag.

    Although there's also a dedicated lane at customs itself for us NEXUS people, it seems about half the time it's staffed by someone who doesn't really grasp that this is a lane for people who know the rules and have had background checks run, and thus they still ask 12 or so questions about the purpose and duration of the visit, where we were born, where we live...


    They've folded NEXUS into the global entry program so you get all the same benefits now under NEXUS. It's pretty fantastic so that you don't need to be travelling in between just the US and Canada in order for it to be useful.
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    Sep 04, 2011 7:22 PM GMT
    Makes sense. The SENTRI program for expediting crossing the US/Mexico border is a godsend (not that I have it....icon_cry.gif )
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    Sep 04, 2011 7:35 PM GMT
    Hmm. Sort of like a fast pass at Disneyland.
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Sep 04, 2011 7:37 PM GMT
    jprichva said
    MSUBioNerd saidI've got a NEXUS card, but I don't think I fly often enough for this program to be terribly worthwhile for me. The big advantage of the NEXUS pass for me, at least, is in the Port Huron/Sarnia crossing, where there's a dedicated lane on the bridge itself for the NEXUS/Fast Pass/etc holders, often cutting an hour or so from the wait

    Who the hell goes to Sarnia??


    I use the Sarnia/Port Huron crossing when traveling from my home in Lansing back to the Buffalo area, where I grew up. (Also, my dad's got a summer house on Lake Erie just outside of Ft. Erie). But I can say that a lot of people use that crossing -- most of the time, there's over a mile of traffic on the bridge for the normal customs lanes.
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    Sep 04, 2011 8:45 PM GMT
    The biometric thing is a moot point -- the US government already has finger prints from all my 10 fingers (and is the only government on the planet that has my prints) from my normal border crossings, so no issue there.

    Are people in the US still under the impression there is such a thing as privacy form the government? I think the last remaining right to privacy died a silent death with the patriot act.
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    Sep 04, 2011 8:48 PM GMT
    Ariodante saidMakes sense. The SENTRI program for expediting crossing the US/Mexico border is a godsend (not that I have it....icon_cry.gif )


    Yes, SENTRI rocks!!!icon_biggrin.gif
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    Sep 04, 2011 9:13 PM GMT
    Tazo995 saidThe biometric thing is a moot point -- the US government already has finger prints from all my 10 fingers (and is the only government on the planet that has my prints) from my normal border crossings, so no issue there.

    Are people in the US still under the impression there is such a thing as privacy form the government? I think the last remaining right to privacy died a silent death with the patriot act.

    And many people with smartphones (iPhone, Android, and Windows) with GPS have their movements reported unless they turn off the feature. Heard a report on the radio today that all law enforcement agencies have to do is request that info and they don't even need a warrant. Also heard on the same report that Windows users who thought they were opting out, were not due to a bug. icon_smile.gif
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    Sep 04, 2011 9:29 PM GMT
    jprichva said
    MSUBioNerd saidI've got a NEXUS card, but I don't think I fly often enough for this program to be terribly worthwhile for me. The big advantage of the NEXUS pass for me, at least, is in the Port Huron/Sarnia crossing, where there's a dedicated lane on the bridge itself for the NEXUS/Fast Pass/etc holders, often cutting an hour or so from the wait

    Who the hell goes to Sarnia??



    People entering the U.S. who have heard horror stories of Detroit and have convinced themselves they are going to be carjacked, raped, mugged, and the victim of drive-by if they enter at the tunnel or bridge in Detroit.
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    Sep 04, 2011 10:07 PM GMT
    Tazo995 saidThe biometric thing is a moot point -- the US government already has finger prints from all my 10 fingers (and is the only government on the planet that has my prints) from my normal border crossings, so no issue there.

    Are people in the US still under the impression there is such a thing as privacy form the government? I think the last remaining right to privacy died a silent death with the patriot act.


    Potential Godwin's violation coming, but worth the mention:

    The Third Reich had nothing on the post-Patriot Act USA as far as the collection of private/personally identifiable information (PII) goes and the surveillance of it's citizens.

    The UK might be a close match though.
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    Sep 04, 2011 10:40 PM GMT
    alphatrigger saidThe UK might be a close match though.

    UK is pretty much on top of things. I was traveling back to the US from Heathrow. My itinerary might have raised a question. I was coming from Eastern Europe and only stayed over in London 1 or 2 nights because of flight availability around Christmas. They asked me where I stayed. I told them. They asked how I heard of that place. I mentioned a tour book. They asked if I had the tour book with me. I said yes. They asked me to show them the page in the tour book that listed where I stayed. I did. Then they said they wanted to take my bags to the special x-ray. I mentioned that I must have tripped something to get the special treatment. They said, no, just routine.

    Then another time I took a small commuter from Koeln-Bonn, Germany to Gatwick to transfer to a US flight. As I approached the gate area, they said "You must be Mr. my name". I said "you guys are good". (I felt like a celeb - who knows, I might be one LOL)
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    Oct 01, 2011 11:51 PM GMT
    Some additional information. US Citizens who participate in the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Global Entry program have a membership number. TSA uses the term Participant ID. Some airlines allow you to enter this number in your frequent flier profile. If TSA determines a passenger is eligible for expedited screening, information will be embedded in the barcode of the passenger’s boarding pass. TSA will read the barcode at the checkpoint and the passenger may be referred to a lane for expedited screening.
    http://www.tsa.gov/what_we_do/escreening.shtm
  • turtleneckjoc...

    Posts: 4685

    Oct 02, 2011 12:20 AM GMT
    socalfitness saidThis is several weeks old, but I wanted to give a heads up and also see if any of you have later information. The program will start as a pilot, open to US Citizens, which will provide shorter lines, ability to keep your computer in your bag even if the bag is not "TSA Friendly".
    http://www.cnn.com/2011/TRAVEL/07/14/tsa.trusted.traveler/index.html

    It will initially be open to elite fliers of a couple of airlines only at selected airports. But it will also be immediately open to members of other trusted programs, such as Global Entry.
    https://goes-app.cbp.dhs.gov/
    For Global Entry, there is a non-refundable application fee of $100, although American Express will refund that to certain card holders. You need to be fingerprinted and provide information about your residence, employment, past international travel, etc. Global Entry speeds entry to the US. Instead of waiting in line, you go to a kiosk, place your thumb against a glass panel, answer a few questions, then get a receipt that you show as you bypass the lines. If the kiosks are out of order, you can just walk to the head of a line. They say if you are not comfortable doing that, just find an agent and they will escort you to the front of the line.


    Is this similar to the system that was put in place in select airports a few years back? I have not heard anything more about it and I believe my airport, Orlando International, was one of the few to receive this.

    I'm in the travel industry and this is one thing I am not fully aware of. Thanks.
  • justarunner

    Posts: 101

    Oct 02, 2011 12:24 AM GMT
    im in love with the NEXUS program simplifies everything. At airports, there are dedicated security lanes, and on land, dedicated bridges. Its now partnered with Global entry/ US program so whether I land there or in Canada, its the same expedited expedited experience.

    All i need now is the EU to jump on board icon_biggrin.gif
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    Oct 02, 2011 12:41 AM GMT
    turtleneckjock said...Is this similar to the system that was put in place in select airports a few years back? I have not heard anything more about it and I believe my airport, Orlando International, was one of the few to receive this.

    I'm in the travel industry and this is one thing I am not fully aware of. Thanks.

    I never completely trust Wikipedia, but this history seems accurate:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Entry

    Government sites:

    http://www.globalentry.gov/
    https://goes-app.cbp.dhs.gov/ Global Online Enrollment System - contains links to Global Entry, Flux, Sentri, Nexus, and Fast

    Not sure if this is still in effect, but I think it is - for certain American Express cardholders, AMEX will refund the $100 Global Entry fee.

    -----------------
    From the GOES Page

    In July 2011, U.S. Customs and Border Protection introduced the Single Trusted Traveler Program Application for SENTRI, NEXUS and Global Entry. U.S. citizen, U.S. lawful permanent resident, Canadian citizen, Canadian landed immigrant, or Mexican citizen applicants can now complete one application and receive access to all modes of travel into the United States.

    *In order to use to the NEXUS vehicle lanes into Canada or use the Canadian pre-clearance kiosks, you must be a NEXUS member. Please visit www.nexus.gov for more information on the NEXUS program.

    **Applicants who apply to NEXUS after they have been approved for Global Entry or SENTRI must pay an additional $50 Canadian application and vetting fee.