Members of debt panel have ties to lobbyists

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    Sep 06, 2011 10:41 PM GMT
    As someone else pointed out elsewhere, they may as well rename it Government Electric.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/many-members-of-debt-supercommittee-have-ties-to-lobbyists/2011/08/23/gIQANiLr4J_story.html?hpid=z3

    Like many federal contractors, General Electric has a lot riding on the work of a new congressional “supercommittee,” which will help decide whether to impose massive cuts in defense and health-care spending.

    But the Connecticut-based conglomerate also has a potential advantage: A number of its lobbyists used to work for members of the committee, and will be able to lobby their former employers to limit the impact of any reductions in the weeks ahead.

    GE is hardly alone: Nearly 100 registered lobbyists used to work for members of the supercommittee, now representing defense companies, health-care conglomerates, Wall Street banks and others with a vested interest in the panel’s outcome, according to a Washington Post analysis of disclosure data. Three Democrats and three Republicans on the panel also employ former industry lobbyists on their staffs.

    The preponderance of lobbyists adds to the political controversy surrounding the supercommittee, which will begin its work in earnest this week as Congress returns to Washington. The panel has already come under fire from watchdog groups for planning its activities in secret and allowing members to continue fundraising while they negotiate a budget deal.
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    Sep 06, 2011 11:05 PM GMT
    I'm sure that no Republican allied companies will benefit. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Sep 06, 2011 11:56 PM GMT
    Christian73 saidI'm sure that no Republican allied companies will benefit. icon_rolleyes.gif


    That's your problem Christian - lately you've seen everything through a partisan lens. Obviously there are companies who have allied themselves to Republicans who will benefit as the article itself notes. GE has also contributed to Republicans if you've missed it - but that's the point. It's also why movements that purge those who seek compromises in deference to special interests in such basic issues as cost control have been important. That's the problem when you ally yourself to party and not ideas.

    Republicans very much also bear responsibility for the spending and the entitlement spending for which the US is running out of resources.
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    Sep 07, 2011 12:01 AM GMT
    riddler78 said
    Christian73 saidI'm sure that no Republican allied companies will benefit. icon_rolleyes.gif


    That's your problem Christian - lately you've seen everything through a partisan lens. Obviously there are companies who have allied themselves to Republicans who will benefit as the article itself notes. GE has also contributed to Republicans if you've missed it - but that's the point. It's also why movements that purge those who seek compromises in deference to special interests in such basic issues as cost control have been important. That's the problem when you ally yourself to party and not ideas.

    Republicans very much also bear responsibility for the spending and the entitlement spending for which the US is running out of resources.


    Thanks for the laugh.
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    Sep 07, 2011 1:14 AM GMT
    riddler78 said
    Christian73 saidI'm sure that no Republican allied companies will benefit. icon_rolleyes.gif


    That's your problem Christian - lately you've seen everything through a partisan lens. Obviously there are companies who have allied themselves to Republicans who will benefit as the article itself notes. GE has also contributed to Republicans if you've missed it - but that's the point. It's also why movements that purge those who seek compromises in deference to special interests in such basic issues as cost control have been important. That's the problem when you ally yourself to party and not ideas.

    Republicans very much also bear responsibility for the spending and the entitlement spending for which the US is running out of resources.


    I was responding to your partisanship regarding GE in earlier posts and in this one since you didn't deign to note any Republican allied companies in your pull quote.

    And let's get something straight: I am not allied to any party. I'm not a Democrat and I'm not a Republican. I criticize Obama when it's warranted. It's just not as warranted as the douche bags you tend to laud on here.

    Further, I am adamantly against all money in politics and believe every election should be publicly financed. That would be the end of all "special interests." Can you say the same?
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    Sep 07, 2011 2:41 AM GMT
    If the American public could outlaw any and all direct contributions to the candidates we would see an end to corporate dominance. All contributions should by law be going into a public fund to be divided equally amongst legitimate candidates running for the office open at any given time. Rather than person to person lobbying, there should be public hearings where varying views can be heard, also present should be an active "peoples lobby" questioning how a proposal in question will affect the voters.

    This is possible to do, but it takes a multitude of people behind some major change like this.

    Sound crazy ?? Why So ? Its crazier for us to let this status quo continue where lobbyists for mega Corps make the rules by buying our government.leaders