We Need To Talk About Kevin

  • sbwlguy

    Posts: 566

    Sep 08, 2011 9:25 PM GMT
    I am SO psyched about seeing this movie. Anyone heard of it?

    1) Looks like Tilda Swinton gives a phenomenal performance
    2) It looks morbid as hell

  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Sep 08, 2011 10:44 PM GMT
    Yeah ... it did a smash up job at Cannes

    I think it'll be a great movie
  • zenmonkie

    Posts: 228

    Sep 09, 2011 1:35 AM GMT
    Whoa. I love that I have no idea what this is about even after watching the trailer, and yet I still want to see it.
  • wild_sky360

    Posts: 1492

    Sep 09, 2011 3:40 AM GMT


    The trailer gave me the impression of having inter-dimensional themes, but then a review on Netflix says this:

    The strained relationship between a mother and her teenage son turns tragic when the boy engineers a massacre at his high school, and the mother is forced to ask how much blame she deserves for the heartbreaking event.

    Director Lynne Ramsay has a marvelous eye, a gift for strong visuals and a hunger for dark material. She was a bold but smart choice to adapt We Need To Talk About Kevin, the best-selling novel by Lionel Shriver. The book is nominally about a school shooting in America. But it's really about a reluctant mother (played with uncompromising skill by Tilda Swinton) who from the moment her child is born simply doesn't love him, simply isn't flooded with the emotions everyone assured her she would feel because "it's different when it's your own." For her, it's not different. It doesn't help that the baby seems to reject her too. She never stops trying to connect or understand the child even as she sees him growing into a disturbingly unempathetic little boy. Did she feel no love for him because he was born this way or did he become this way because she couldn't offer him the maternal love every baby deserves? This emotional journey is fitfully captured in the film, which is inevitably dominated by the school shooting itself and Swinton's miserable life afterwards in the community and her repeated visits to her son in prison. Is he human or just a monster? And is she a monster for not being able to love him? All of this is addressed visually and intellectually in the film, but the dots aren't quite connected emotionally. The film misses the career as a successful travel writer and businesswoman that Swinton sacrificed (it's alluded to briefly) and loses some of the impact of the climax by ditching the novel's narrative decision to have the mother address her husband in letters talking about their son. It's a film to admire, but not one that quite wrenches your heart out the way it should. And the horror of the killings (echoed too often with the color red dominating the film's palette) just doesn't let us focus on what made the book more than just a fictional Columbine: the horror of a mother who fears she never should have become pregnant in the first place.
  • Trauts

    Posts: 1012

    Sep 09, 2011 4:09 AM GMT
    Trollileo said
    zenmonkie saidWhoa. I love that I have no idea what this is about even after watching the trailer, and yet I still want to see it.
    Same here. I need to pirate every horror movie now.


    icon_eek.gif Me too. Had to visit Wikipedia to find out what was going on. I wanna read the book.
  • Musicman91

    Posts: 1529

    Sep 09, 2011 4:33 AM GMT
    Love Tilda. This movie looks very good and intense I'll have to check it out.
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    Sep 09, 2011 4:38 AM GMT
    Wow! That just made me want to read to book! The trailer looks really good and I'll watch it for sure, but will read the book first. I always saw the book on the shelves but never picked it up to read the sinopsis..
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Sep 09, 2011 7:28 AM GMT
    TIFF is on. That's the one that will make or break it.
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    Sep 09, 2011 8:08 AM GMT
    I thought the book was brilliant so I'm interested to see how they turn it into a film.
  • wild_sky360

    Posts: 1492

    Sep 09, 2011 8:30 AM GMT
    Most of these kids are smart enough to skip the massacre stage and rise up to sit in multiple boardrooms.

    There they can lay off thousands of workers in order to boost stock price in time for bonuses.

    They can actively choose to degrade the environment and consumer safety and just pay the nominal fine instead.

    They make ideal CEO's and horrifying back stabbing coworkers. They possess all the qualities transnational corporations are looking for.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Sep 09, 2011 11:28 AM GMT
    wild_sky360 said

    The trailer gave me the impression of having inter-dimensional themes, but then a review on Netflix says this:

    The strained relationship between a mother and her teenage son turns tragic when the boy engineers a massacre at his high school, and the mother is forced to ask how much blame she deserves for the heartbreaking event.

    Director Lynne Ramsay has a marvelous eye, a gift for strong visuals and a hunger for dark material. She was a bold but smart choice to adapt We Need To Talk About Kevin, the best-selling novel by Lionel Shriver. The book is nominally about a school shooting in America. But it's really about a reluctant mother (played with uncompromising skill by Tilda Swinton) who from the moment her child is born simply doesn't love him, simply isn't flooded with the emotions everyone assured her she would feel because "it's different when it's your own." For her, it's not different. It doesn't help that the baby seems to reject her too. She never stops trying to connect or understand the child even as she sees him growing into a disturbingly unempathetic little boy. Did she feel no love for him because he was born this way or did he become this way because she couldn't offer him the maternal love every baby deserves? This emotional journey is fitfully captured in the film, which is inevitably dominated by the school shooting itself and Swinton's miserable life afterwards in the community and her repeated visits to her son in prison. Is he human or just a monster? And is she a monster for not being able to love him? All of this is addressed visually and intellectually in the film, but the dots aren't quite connected emotionally. The film misses the career as a successful travel writer and businesswoman that Swinton sacrificed (it's alluded to briefly) and loses some of the impact of the climax by ditching the novel's narrative decision to have the mother address her husband in letters talking about their son. It's a film to admire, but not one that quite wrenches your heart out the way it should. And the horror of the killings (echoed too often with the color red dominating the film's palette) just doesn't let us focus on what made the book more than just a fictional Columbine: the horror of a mother who fears she never should have become pregnant in the first place.


    Book seems alot better.