French photographer in Detroit

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    Sep 13, 2011 3:00 AM GMT
    I came across this provocative photo collection, and I thought I'd post it on here for anyone who's interested. The comments are also informative. In fact, I read most of the comments, and it felt like an informal education on the post-WWII history of Detroit.

    http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2011/02/07/captured-the-ruins-of-detroit/2672/
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    Sep 13, 2011 3:04 AM GMT
    Wow.. what a shame.. that is some awesome architecture....... sad to see it just rot and crumble.
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    Sep 13, 2011 4:18 AM GMT
    Detroit is serious fodder for some awesome coffee-table books these days.

    This statement, however, is either disingenuous or just plain ignorant:

    "The state of ruin is essentially a temporary situation that happens at some point, the volatile result of change of era and the fall of empires."

    Here is a more sober (and kind of funny) look at the reasons behind Detroit's decline:



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    Sep 13, 2011 5:21 AM GMT
    JackNWNJ saidDetroit is serious fodder for some awesome coffee-table books these days.

    This statement, however, is either disingenuous or just plain ignorant:

    "The state of ruin is essentially a temporary situation that happens at some point, the volatile result of change of era and the fall of empires."

    Here is a more sober (and kind of funny) look at the reasons behind Detroit's decline:





    Not to be rude, but I thought that video was oversimplified, politically polarized, and unsympathetic. In addition, I don't agree that the above quote was either disingenuous or ignorant. There is quite enough candor in the photographs. The quote, given the subject matter, is relieving and, along with the subsequent sentence, provides a reason to look at those saddening images.
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    Sep 13, 2011 5:24 AM GMT
    I adore Detroit. It’s a once wonderful French city with its huge boulevards fanning out from Cadillac Square. It so pains me to see such wonderful Art Deco architecture wasting away like this. I’m so old that I remember the better days during my misspent youth hanging on Woodward looking for trouble. I’ve explored many of these sites including the old Packard plant on Grand River. I somehow wish we had the billion upon billion of dollars to put this city back together before it’s too late.

    I still see this city several times per year for the Detroit Auto Show and for some really fun events during the summer such as.





    Strangely enough, I find it to be the friendliest big city in the country.

    Such a happy time for detroit, remembering what was one day long ago.
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    Sep 13, 2011 5:28 AM GMT
    washparkguy said
    JackNWNJ saidDetroit is serious fodder for some awesome coffee-table books these days.

    This statement, however, is either disingenuous or just plain ignorant:

    "The state of ruin is essentially a temporary situation that happens at some point, the volatile result of change of era and the fall of empires."

    Here is a more sober (and kind of funny) look at the reasons behind Detroit's decline:





    Not to be rude, but I thought that video was oversimplified, politically polarized, and unsympathetic. In addition, I don't agree that the above quote was either disingenuous or ignorant. There is quite enough candor in the photographs. The quote, given the subject matter, is relieving and, along with the subsequent sentence, provides a reason to look at those saddening images.
    its JACKass's M.O.
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    Sep 13, 2011 5:32 AM GMT
    Wow, some areas of Detroit look like the aftermath of Chernobyl.

    It's sad to see a formerly great city fall apart like this without signs of hope in the near future.
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    Sep 13, 2011 5:39 AM GMT
    Gosh, there's some amazingly beautiful architecture and interior decoration wasting away in those photos icon_sad.gif

    I'm not from the US, may someone please tell me how and why Detroit came to decline to such a state ? I vaguely remember it's the home of Motown and the American auto industry. Hopefully some of the architectural treasures can be saved :/

    These photos remind me of a photographic expedition I went on with a friend in Italy to an abandoned mental hospital in Colorno, near Parma. The silence and decay was eery and the state of various places in the building made one wonder why a place was abandoned.
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    Sep 13, 2011 5:41 AM GMT
    pocketnico saidWow, some areas of Detroit look like the aftermath of Chernobyl.

    It's sad to see a formerly great city fall apart like this without signs of hope in the near future.


    Big air of optimism in the city right now.

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    Sep 13, 2011 5:45 AM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    pocketnico saidWow, some areas of Detroit look like the aftermath of Chernobyl.

    It's sad to see a formerly great city fall apart like this without signs of hope in the near future.


    Big air of optimism in the city right now.



    I sure hope so. When people abandon a city like that in large numbers, it's pretty difficult to get the remaining and their descendants to carry on and rebuild. It would be nice to see current and future residents of Detroit turn the city around.
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    Sep 13, 2011 5:52 AM GMT
    pocketnico said
    freedomisntfree said
    pocketnico saidWow, some areas of Detroit look like the aftermath of Chernobyl.

    It's sad to see a formerly great city fall apart like this without signs of hope in the near future.


    Big air of optimism in the city right now.



    I sure hope so. When people abandon a city like that in large numbers, it's pretty difficult to get the remaining and their descendants to carry on and rebuild. It would be nice to see current and future residents of Detroit turn the city around.


    We’ve seen other cities do it, but with the intricacies of the art deco architecture, it would ball bustlingly expensive to restore as was.

    The metro is still around 5mil so the folks are still there, but escaped to the ‘burbs.
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    Sep 13, 2011 5:58 AM GMT
    Stay north of Base Line Road and you see a whole other detroit, metro that is. Wayne County is real different from Oakland and McComb.
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    Sep 13, 2011 6:04 AM GMT
    Detroit is interesting to me from a linguistic perspective. It's part of the Inland Northern American dialect region, which is characterized by the Northern Cities Vowel Shift that's been occurring since the early 20th century. Cities like Detroit, Chicago, and Buffalo have been leading this dramatic shifting of vowels. It's rapidly spreading to nearby regions of the US.

    But that's a whole other topic not related to this one icon_smile.gif
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    Sep 13, 2011 6:09 AM GMT
    pocketnico saidWow, some areas of Detroit look like the aftermath of Chernobyl.

    It's sad to see a formerly great city fall apart like this without signs of hope in the near future.


    I thought the exact same thing - these could easily be pictures of Pripyat.

    Another thought that came to mind is that it seems so much easier to have concern for New Orleans. Both cities are rich with heritage and culture, but it is more palatable to save a city that has been ravaged by a natural disaster, than one ravaged by human error or neglect.
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    Sep 13, 2011 6:11 AM GMT
    jprichva said
    freedomisntfree saidStay north of Base Line Road and you see a whole other detroit, metro that is. Wayne County is real different from Oakland and McComb.

    Um, that's "Macomb". And for the uninitiated, "Base Line Road" is a largely unused alternate name for the more famous "8 Mile Road".


    True, but Base Line Road was the 'used to be' name.
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    Sep 13, 2011 6:14 AM GMT
    or how 'bout M102?
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    Sep 13, 2011 6:26 AM GMT
    It really is so sad. When we were kids Detroit was the closest city and the decay had already begun but there was still somewhat of a downtown, Hudsons etc where I'd play on the escalators and elevators while mom shopped and dad went who knows where. Now I go every odd weekend to Greektown at night. Hadn't even been downtown in the daylight for years until this past June for pride so I drove around a little, it was Sunday but so desolate. There were for all intent absolutely no people at all walking around on the streets, no cars driving around. I drove down Woodward for a good 1/4 mile and was pretty much the only car in either direction. Most of the ruins are gone and there's blocks and blocks of vacant land and fortunately some new building but they'll never replace those beautiful old buildings and houses that are permanently gone
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    Sep 13, 2011 1:57 PM GMT
    Detroit, hands down, is one of my favorite cities in the US. Every citizen needs to visit Detroit at least once to get a feel for what humans and time can do to a city.

    Driving through the city on John R. Street, Grand Boulevard, and Vernor Highway, past all of the abandoned factories, really puts things into perspective. You'll see acres of urban prairie with an abandoned home sitting squarely in the middle of the block. Not only that, but you may spot packs of wild dogs roaming the city!



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    Sep 14, 2011 5:07 AM GMT
    Columbusite777 saidDetroit, hands down, is one of my favorite cities in the US. Every citizen needs to visit Detroit at least once to get a feel for what humans and time can do to a city.

    Driving through the city on John R. Street, Grand Boulevard, and Vernor Highway, past all of the abandoned factories, really puts things into perspective. You'll see acres of urban prairie with an abandoned home sitting squarely in the middle of the block. Not only that, but you may spot packs of wild dogs roaming the city!





    The Paris of the midwest --- or was --- or could / should be.