Atlas Shrugged - Can anyone help?

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    Sep 15, 2011 11:21 PM GMT
    There's an essay contest for this book. I slaved away for over 40 hours this week writing and editing it...

    Has anyone read the book, and are you willing to read my essay and give me ANY critique? I love to be torn apart, it just makes it better!

    (and the torn apart bit isn't about shexy time).

    Prease?

    Let me know icon_smile.gif

    it's only 1300 words!
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    Sep 15, 2011 11:33 PM GMT
    Awwwww they were doing the Essay Scholarship contest for this book back when I was college like a decade ago.
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    Sep 15, 2011 11:37 PM GMT
    Dear God.

    Ayn Rand? Is she still around?
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    Sep 15, 2011 11:38 PM GMT
    It was written when? In the 40s? I'm reading the fountain head now.
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    Sep 15, 2011 11:43 PM GMT
    she died in the 70s, wrote it in 57
  • wild_sky360

    Posts: 1492

    Sep 15, 2011 11:55 PM GMT
    Inostrankan saidDear God.

    Ayn Rand? Is she still around?


    Sort of:
    http://www.aynrand.org/site/PageServer?pagename=index

    She had a valid perspective on some economic and social issues. If she wasn't so strident they might have gained more popular support. G. Edward Griffin and Ron Paul are the kinder, gentler acolytes.
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    Sep 15, 2011 11:58 PM GMT
    Yeah, that's their mission, and it's a great one at that except for the fact that colleges are extremely liberal and most teachers will strike down capitalist-minded students too quickly.
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    Sep 15, 2011 11:58 PM GMT
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    Sep 15, 2011 11:59 PM GMT
    jprichva saidI'm very sorry that you had to slog though those 1000 pages of labored prose, wooden characterizations, and inane philosophical ranting.

    My heart goes out to you. But don't lose your copy of the book. It has many fine uses:

    1. It can be placed on a chair to allow a small child to sit up high enough to reach the dinner table.

    2. It is excellent for keeping your screen door propped open.

    3. You can press leaves within its pages.

    4. It is a handy weapon in case of burglary, assuming you're strong enough to throw it.

    5. It can double as an ottoman, if required.

    6. And not least, if you find yourself in the bathroom and discover that you've forgotten to buy toilet paper.....



    Do you pull the pages out from the back of the book first or the front???
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    Sep 15, 2011 11:59 PM GMT
    Dorothy Parker, when asked about Atlas Shrugged: “This is not a novel to be tossed aside lightly. It should be thrown with great force.”
  • wild_sky360

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    Sep 16, 2011 12:05 AM GMT
    theantijock saidHave we been very helpful so far?


    hehehehe
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    Sep 16, 2011 12:06 AM GMT
    jprichva said
    jayp saidYeah, that's their mission, and it's a great one at that except for the fact that colleges are extremely liberal and most teachers will strike down capitalist-minded students too quickly.

    Please don't fall into that manichaean trap.
    You don't have to be "anti-capitalist" to despise Rand and her rantings.


    oh, i'm not, i was just pointing it out. my minor actually professes socialism and other views extremely far from Rand's views.

    i was just pointing out why the Ayn Rand Institute believes that college/high school is the battleground
  • wild_sky360

    Posts: 1492

    Sep 16, 2011 12:08 AM GMT
    I got through The Fountainhead with an appreciation for some concepts. I started Atlas and soon realized that everything I hated about the former, was only amplified in the latter.
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    Sep 16, 2011 12:17 AM GMT
    jprichva saidI'm very sorry that you had to slog though those 1000 pages of labored prose, wooden characterizations, and inane philosophical ranting.

    My heart goes out to you. But don't lose your copy of the book. It has many fine uses:

    1. It can be placed on a chair to allow a small child to sit up high enough to reach the dinner table.

    2. It is excellent for keeping your screen door propped open.

    3. You can press leaves within its pages.

    4. It is a handy weapon in case of burglary, assuming you're strong enough to throw it.

    5. It can double as an ottoman, if required.

    6. And not least, if you find yourself in the bathroom and discover that you've forgotten to buy toilet paper.....



    All of the above just rocked my WHIRLD. Probably will still be Laughing for as long as it takes me to read that book. lulz.
  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    Sep 16, 2011 1:03 AM GMT
    Ayn Rand was, for the most part, a phony and a hack, and she loved attention (and never wanted for slavish devotees). There may be a few shreds of philosophical value here and there (not that I necessarily agree with them), but for the most part her perspective can be summed up as a Nietzschean "super individual survival of the fittest" at the expense of anyone weaker. A lot of the neo-cons who rose to prominence during the Bush administration (and who also strong-armed McCain into accepting Sarah Palin as his running mate) LOVED Ayn Rand, and apparently read her works without any iota of critical thinking (and I bet Sarah Palin never heard of her).
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    Sep 16, 2011 1:25 AM GMT
    I found her books to be a fun read. I can see how you'd call her nihilist but not quite sure I agree. I usually think of Turgenev and not Nietzsche when I think of nihilism so maybe I'm coming at it differently. To me, she seemed like Adam Smith on steroids.

    What always struck me as really odd though about Rand was that the main female character always gets raped by the male character and loves it. So weird, especially coming from a female author.
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    Sep 16, 2011 1:42 AM GMT
    Jeandeau said
    jprichva saidI'm very sorry that you had to slog though those 1000 pages of labored prose, wooden characterizations, and inane philosophical ranting.

    My heart goes out to you. But don't lose your copy of the book. It has many fine uses:

    1. It can be placed on a chair to allow a small child to sit up high enough to reach the dinner table.

    2. It is excellent for keeping your screen door propped open.

    3. You can press leaves within its pages.

    4. It is a handy weapon in case of burglary, assuming you're strong enough to throw it.

    5. It can double as an ottoman, if required.

    6. And not least, if you find yourself in the bathroom and discover that you've forgotten to buy toilet paper.....



    All of the above just rocked my WHIRLD. Probably will still be Laughing for as long as it takes me to read that book. lulz.


    So very funny. Because it's true. That book is a humongous steaming turd.
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    Sep 16, 2011 1:43 AM GMT
    i don't think they're raped as much as they consent to surrendering themselves to whatever the man pleases, but she has sex with three characters in the story...one man asks, she seeks out another man, and the third i guess you could say ...'rapes' because he doesn't ask but it was always consent-worthy i thought.

    sorry, out of all things of her books, i enjoyed her philosophy of romance much more than anything else
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    Sep 16, 2011 1:47 AM GMT
    There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old's life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.
    --John Rogers
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    Sep 16, 2011 1:49 AM GMT
    hahahaa, i read lord of the rings at 14, and atlas shrugged at 20.

    i'm fucked!
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    Sep 16, 2011 2:00 AM GMT
    jayp saidi don't think they're raped as much as they consent to surrendering themselves to whatever the man pleases, but she has sex with three characters in the story...one man asks, she seeks out another man, and the third i guess you could say ...'rapes' because he doesn't ask but it was always consent-worthy i thought.

    sorry, out of all things of her books, i enjoyed her philosophy of romance much more than anything else


    You've read it more recently than me but I just remember it seeming a little violent with weird context, especially in the Fountainhead. LIke I said, the women always enjoyed it but it wasn't mutual. The men were possessing the women. And I just thought that was weird for a female author. Not a big deal. Just something that stood out to me.
  • starboard5

    Posts: 969

    Sep 16, 2011 2:49 AM GMT
    Poor jayp...did you know this would turn into dodge ball? lol
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    Sep 16, 2011 2:56 AM GMT
    The first guy I ever dated was an extreme Rand follower. At the time, I didn't know much of Rand's work, but let's just say when I finally did....whatever our "relationship" was, ended real quick.
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    Sep 16, 2011 3:10 AM GMT
    intentsman saidThere are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old's life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.
    --John Rogers

    icon_eek.gif
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    Sep 16, 2011 3:25 AM GMT
    In the Rand Fantasy, society's best and brightest allow themselves to become ruthless so as to fulfill their dreams, and in so doing civilization flourishes....and more opportunity abounds. Lovely.

    In Reality, those predisposed to ruthlessness are more likely to be Mexican Drug Lords, Saddam Hussein-Moammar Gaddafi types.......or Karl Rove.