Simple question... simple answer.

  • DaToNY22

    Posts: 82

    May 14, 2008 6:45 PM GMT
    I feel like reading something new, preferably something non-fiction. Any suggestions? Let's hear it icon_eek.gif

    -Tony

  • justjk

    Posts: 302

    May 14, 2008 6:55 PM GMT
    Anything by David Sedaris is always a great read!
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    May 14, 2008 7:53 PM GMT
    David Sedaris is good...i also like n e thing by Augusten Burroughs.
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    May 14, 2008 7:55 PM GMT
    Power of Art by Simon Schama
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    May 14, 2008 7:55 PM GMT
    The new John Grisham book "Playing for Pizza" is pretty good as well...its light and is not a lawyer based thriller. I just finished it and i recommend it for a light read.
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    May 14, 2008 8:07 PM GMT
    If you haven't read them already... Blink or The Tipping Point both by Malcolm Gladwell
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    May 14, 2008 9:25 PM GMT
    I love the book Fair Game: My Life as a Spy by Valerie Plame Wilson. Really great non-fiction read! What makes the book even more interesting, is since she worked for the CIA, the government censored her book, so just like released government documents, there are black marks through things considered "classified"- although many of those things are revealed in the afterward, which was written by someone else.
  • ep83

    Posts: 144

    May 14, 2008 9:44 PM GMT
    http://www.slate.com and http://www.salon.com are always good for light reading about culture, politics, society, and pretty much anything else.

    Imperial Life in the Emerald City by Rajiv Chandrasekaran is the best book about the Iraq occupation, depressing as it is, that I've read. He has a number of interesting profiles of different players in the process including military, American civilian, and Iraqi.

    Just make sure this doesn't happen:
    http://www.theonion.com/content/news/area_eccentric_reads_entire_book
  • jarhead5536

    Posts: 1348

    May 14, 2008 9:53 PM GMT
    The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Middle East Conflict by Mitchell Geoffrey Bard.

    What's the Matter With Kansas? by Thomas Frank.

    The Rise of the Creative Class by Richard Florida.
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    May 14, 2008 9:58 PM GMT
    It depends on what genre you like. I recently read Jon Krakauer's Into Thin Air and was totally engrossed by it. I read the whole thing in two days.

    If you like biographies I'd recommend either Curt Gentry's book about J. Edgar Hoover or Ron Chernow's Titan about John D. Rockefeller.

    If history is your thing, I'd recommend

    Patriots by A.J. Langguth
    The Gulag Archipelago by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
    A Peace to End All Peace by David Fromkin
    or Witness by Whittaker Chambers.

    These are some of the non-fiction books I've really enjoyed.
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    May 14, 2008 10:07 PM GMT
    How can any of us suggest a book for you? We don't know your interests well enough to do that. I do suggest you go to a large bookstore or library and look into books that are about something that peaks your interests.

    You may not like my favorite non-fiction writer, Ann Coulter.

    Just kidding.



  • auryn

    Posts: 2061

    May 14, 2008 10:15 PM GMT
    John43620 said
    You may not like my favorite non-fiction writer, Ann Coulter.

    Just kidding.


    I think I just threw up in my mouth a little.icon_eek.gif I hear that if you say her name the mirror three times, she'll suck your soul.

    I'm reading I Am America (And So Can You), by Dr. Stephen Colbert, DFA. I'm sure he considers this a non-fiction work.




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    May 14, 2008 10:49 PM GMT
    Global_Citizen said Witness by Whittaker Chambers.

    These are some of the non-fiction books I've really enjoyed.


    Of course, classing Witness as non-fiction is not exactly a noncontroversial viewpoint.
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    May 15, 2008 1:03 AM GMT
    jprichva said

    Of course, classing Witness as non-fiction is not exactly a noncontroversial viewpoint.

    Let's not even go there.
  • bradsmith

    Posts: 175

    May 15, 2008 2:56 AM GMT
    For some definite non-fiction, I've been enjoying:
    "Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why"
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    May 15, 2008 4:49 PM GMT
    the Satyricon, by Petronius
  • DaToNY22

    Posts: 82

    May 15, 2008 5:29 PM GMT
    czarodziej saidthe Satyricon, by Petronius


    Great Roman novel.. but I'm a Latin nerd so I always say that icon_smile.gif
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    May 15, 2008 5:33 PM GMT
    Madonna: Like an Icon by Lucy O'Brien
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    May 15, 2008 5:38 PM GMT
    Hmmm.... how about "A Walk in the Woods" by Bill Bryson. Very funny and very informative.

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    May 15, 2008 5:41 PM GMT
    gift of fear by gavin de becker
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    May 15, 2008 5:43 PM GMT
    Catching the Big Fish: Meditation, Consciousness, and Creativity

    by David Lynch
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    May 15, 2008 5:44 PM GMT
    Tony- awesome u know of it- i was saying in another forum that i just happened across it on a bookshelf of provided reading material in a cafe- and liked it so much i smuggled it out lol- its amazing; i love ancient literature, but this book in particular strikes me as being an amazing cultural, economic, political parallel with the current state of things here in the USA- AND it is dead-on with gay culture... despite having to go underground for a thousand years or so lol, its resurfaced today and nothing has changed since the bath houses of Rome. ok, well more designer labels, and no more sex slaves (legal ones lol)- buut, the drama, the heart break, the loneliness, the joy of eros meeting his anteros- all are the same. and its written so well- a great book. icon_smile.gif really speaks to the human condition, and to the condition gays find themselves in, particularly.
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    May 15, 2008 5:55 PM GMT
    If you don't mind reading things in script form, find a copy of any of the plays by Shakespeare(always loved his plays and poems), Oscar Wilde, Noel Coward, or Tom Stoppard.

    If you want a book for some knowledge(about Samurai lol) try Secrets of the Samurai by Oscar Ratti and Adele Westbrook.

    I'm also reading Swan Song by Robert R. McCammon. I know you said non-fiction, but this is a good book IMO.