TROY DAVIS. Are you following his case? His execution has been delayed.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 22, 2011 1:44 AM GMT
    Even many prison officials are asking for this execution to be halted.

    There is so much doubt about the guilt of Troy Davis.

    Have you followed his story?
  • creature

    Posts: 5197

    Sep 22, 2011 2:47 AM GMT
    I'm surprised that with the doubt about his guilt that the delay didn't come sooner. With a criminal case, a person is supposed to be found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.
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    Sep 22, 2011 2:54 AM GMT
    I was watching Ed Shultz and Anderson Cooper, just now and from what they are saying the Supreme court ruled against Troy Davis plea before them. Not good news for Davis and another black eye for the south and its love for the death penalty.
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:00 AM GMT
    Davis was declared dead at 11:08 p.m. ET.


    I have problems with this case.. serious ones.


    And I support the death penalty ( NOT frivolously).
  • Mepark

    Posts: 806

    Sep 22, 2011 4:03 AM GMT
    I don't think he was innocent, but it wouldn't have hurt to give a polygraph test. So in a way, what happened was sad, but it's done. They can get to finding the real killer since that's what they claim. Then it'll be really sad and tragic. Otherwise, I'm over it.
  • nanidesukedo

    Posts: 1036

    Sep 22, 2011 4:06 AM GMT
    Mepark saidI don't think he was innocent, but it wouldn't have hurt to give a polygraph test. So in a way, what happened was sad, but it's done. They can get to finding the real killer since that's what they claim. Then it'll be really sad and tragic. Otherwise, I'm over it.


    The harm in doing the polygraph test could've been as follows: The polygraph test is notoriously inaccurate. It's known to give both false positives and false negatives. So, let's say they give it to him and it comes back that he's not lying about being innocent...A polygraph doesn't prove innocence or guilt...it's just a "piece of evidence" and a dubious one at that. Now, assuming it came back saying he was innocent, it acts as another piece of inflammatory fodder.
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:08 AM GMT
    Mepark saidI don't think he was innocent, but it wouldn't have hurt to give a polygraph test. But it's done and they can get to finding the real killer since according to them he's out there. Otherwise, I'm over it.


    Polygraphs are unreliable, which is why they are not admitted as evidence. Pathological liars can fool them. If he passed the polygraph, it would have ignited a firestorm, but it wouldn't have done anything to prove his innocence or guilt.

    I haven't kept up with the story myself. I don't have an opinion as to his guilt, but none of the appeals could find anything legitimate to overturn the verdict.
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:12 AM GMT
    All of the "witnesses" were shown a single photo of Davis, which is an absolute no-no! You show them a lineup or several photos to pick from. Plus it was dark and they were 120 feet away. This is too far to recognize a face even in daylight. This man should not have died.
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:14 AM GMT
    DudeInNOVA said

    I haven't kept up with the story myself. I don't have an opinion as to his guilt, but none of the appeals could find anything legitimate to overturn the verdict.
    There were some serious problems with the prosecution in this case..
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:15 AM GMT
    Scruffypup saidAll of the "witnesses" were shown a single photo of Davis, which is an absolute no-no! You show them a lineup or several photos to pick from. Plus it was dark and they were 120 feet away. This is too far to recognize a face even in daylight. This man should not have died.


    I'm not sure that's always the case. Sometimes, they can bring a suspect in front of a person and ask if he/she is the person who allegedly committed the crime. They do it all the time on COPS. I don't know the legalities of when they have to show more than one person in the line-up, and when they can just show a single person.

    (Again, I haven't followed the case. I'm just commenting on specific aspects.)
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:16 AM GMT
    TropicalMark said
    DudeInNOVA said

    I haven't kept up with the story myself. I don't have an opinion as to his guilt, but none of the appeals could find anything legitimate to overturn the verdict.
    There were some serious problems with the prosecution in this case..


    Like what? I know that people are calling things into question, but the Supreme Court couldn't find enough evidence to overthrow the verdict or even to delay the execution again.
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:23 AM GMT
    DudeInNOVA said
    TropicalMark said
    DudeInNOVA said

    I haven't kept up with the story myself. I don't have an opinion as to his guilt, but none of the appeals could find anything legitimate to overturn the verdict.
    There were some serious problems with the prosecution in this case..


    Like what? I know that people are calling things into question, but the Supreme Court couldn't find enough evidence to overthrow the verdict or even to delay the execution again.
    Even some state prosecutors are saying things were problematic. When there is doubt... death is out of the question. Period. There is NO ' oops we made a mistake' or 'do over'.
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:23 AM GMT
    I'm honestly appalled by this case being that I've always been a hardcore opponent regarding capital punishment. Sadly I foresaw this coming- I mean- coming from a blind judicial system, lead by one of those pale stale males down there, this was pretty much inevitable. I don't believe that justice has been served tonight.
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:25 AM GMT
    Bullwinklemoos saidI'm honestly appalled by this case being that I've always been a hardcore opponent regarding capital punishment. Sadly I foresaw this coming- I mean- coming from a blind judicial system, lead by one of those pale stale males down there, this was pretty much inevitable. I don't believe that justice has been served tonight.
    Classic!
    We BOTH agree but are on opposite sides of capital punishment.. Therein lies WHY this should NOT have happened tonight.
    Justice failed.
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:37 AM GMT
    I don't want to stir up a hornet's nest, so I'll probably just leave the topic alone.

    I tried to read about it, but I couldn't get very many solid details. Most of what I saw had to do with the witnesses. I would have like to have seen something about the forensic evidence.

    I'm on the fence about capital punishment.

    Part of the reason I'm cautious about cases like these is due to a story that came out not to long ago. It was about a prisoner who had been executed. Like this case, questions were raised about the verdict. People spent years trying to exonerate him, even long after his death. They finally had a DNA test done, and it turned out he was guilty after all.
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:42 AM GMT
    TropicalMark said
    Bullwinklemoos saidI'm honestly appalled by this case being that I've always been a hardcore opponent regarding capital punishment. Sadly I foresaw this coming- I mean- coming from a blind judicial system, lead by one of those pale stale males down there, this was pretty much inevitable. I don't believe that justice has been served tonight.
    Classic!
    We BOTH agree but are on opposite sides of capital punishment.. Therein lies WHY this should NOT have happened tonight.
    Justice failed.



    Tonight our government demonstrated that they will murder you even when they're is reasonable doubt of guilt. Tragic.
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:47 AM GMT
    Ravco said
    TropicalMark said
    Bullwinklemoos saidI'm honestly appalled by this case being that I've always been a hardcore opponent regarding capital punishment. Sadly I foresaw this coming- I mean- coming from a blind judicial system, lead by one of those pale stale males down there, this was pretty much inevitable. I don't believe that justice has been served tonight.
    Classic!
    We BOTH agree but are on opposite sides of capital punishment.. Therein lies WHY this should NOT have happened tonight.
    Justice failed.



    Tonight our government demonstrated that they will murder you even when they're is reasonable doubt of guilt. Tragic.
    The GEORGIA government failed.
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:51 AM GMT
    DudeInNOVA saidI don't want to stir up a hornet's nest, so I'll probably just leave the topic alone.

    I tried to read about it, but I couldn't get very many solid details. Most of what I saw had to do with the witnesses. I would have like to have seen something about the forensic evidence.

    I'm on the fence about capital punishment.

    Part of the reason I'm cautious about cases like these is due to a story that came out not to long ago. It was about a prisoner who had been executed. Like this case, questions were raised about the verdict. People spent years trying to exonerate him, even long after his death. They finally had a DNA test done, and it turned out he was guilty after all.
    Don't leave the thread.. stirring up a hornets nest? You aren't 'guilty' of that LOL

    But as far as your last comment goes.. there are just as many that have been exonerated AFTER death.. and therein lies the problem. I'm all in favor of the death penalty for those convicted 'dead right' of guilt..
    The individual that was put to death earlier this evening in Texas definitely deserved it. Without ANY doubt.
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:51 AM GMT
    TropicalMark said
    Ravco said
    TropicalMark said
    Bullwinklemoos saidI'm honestly appalled by this case being that I've always been a hardcore opponent regarding capital punishment. Sadly I foresaw this coming- I mean- coming from a blind judicial system, lead by one of those pale stale males down there, this was pretty much inevitable. I don't believe that justice has been served tonight.
    Classic!
    We BOTH agree but are on opposite sides of capital punishment.. Therein lies WHY this should NOT have happened tonight.
    Justice failed.



    Tonight our government demonstrated that they will murder you even when they're is reasonable doubt of guilt. Tragic.
    The GEORGIA government failed.



    I feel like the supremes, by refusing the stay, injected an implicit go-ahead, but yes, Georgia specifically failed.
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:52 AM GMT
    Ravco said
    TropicalMark said
    Ravco said
    TropicalMark said
    Bullwinklemoos saidI'm honestly appalled by this case being that I've always been a hardcore opponent regarding capital punishment. Sadly I foresaw this coming- I mean- coming from a blind judicial system, lead by one of those pale stale males down there, this was pretty much inevitable. I don't believe that justice has been served tonight.
    Classic!
    We BOTH agree but are on opposite sides of capital punishment.. Therein lies WHY this should NOT have happened tonight.
    Justice failed.



    Tonight our government demonstrated that they will murder you even when they're is reasonable doubt of guilt. Tragic.
    The GEORGIA government failed.



    I feel like the supremes, by refusing the stay, injected an implicit go-ahead, but yes, Georgia specifically failed.
    True enough.......
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    Sep 22, 2011 4:58 AM GMT
    Ravco.. just some other info you may not know about:

    A new analysis they say shows ballistics testimony at his trial was "inaccurate and misleading." They also note that a federal judge found in 2010 that a jailhouse informer's testimony that Davis confessed to killing MacPhail was "patently false" and that prosecutors knew a key eyewitness account was wrong.

    Right there we have 'issues'.........

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    Sep 22, 2011 5:00 AM GMT
    TropicalMark saidDon't leave the thread.. stirring up a hornets nest? You aren't 'guilty' of that LOL

    But as far as your last comment goes.. there are just as many that have been exonerated AFTER death.. and therein lies the problem. I'm all in favor of the death penalty for those convicted 'dead right' of guilt..
    The individual that was put to death earlier this evening in Texas definitely deserved it. Without ANY doubt.


    True enough. But what does "dead right of guilt" mean? How much proof is required? Witness testimony is notoriously unreliable, but sometimes that's all there is. That's why I was interested in the forensic evidence.

    People these days want solid proof. They call it the "CSI Effect." But many times, there is no solid evidence, particularly in these older cases.
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    Sep 22, 2011 5:01 AM GMT
    DudeInNOVA said
    TropicalMark saidDon't leave the thread.. stirring up a hornets nest? You aren't 'guilty' of that LOL

    But as far as your last comment goes.. there are just as many that have been exonerated AFTER death.. and therein lies the problem. I'm all in favor of the death penalty for those convicted 'dead right' of guilt..
    The individual that was put to death earlier this evening in Texas definitely deserved it. Without ANY doubt.


    True enough. But what does "dead right of guilt" mean? How much proof is required? Witness testimony is notoriously unreliable, but sometimes that's all there is. That's why I was interested in the forensic evidence.

    People these days want solid proof. They call it the "CSI Effect." But many times, there is no solid evidence, particularly in these older cases.
    See my post above for details on some of the 'forensic' evidence issues.
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    Sep 22, 2011 5:05 AM GMT
    TropicalMark saidRavco.. just some other info you may not know about:

    A new analysis they say shows ballistics testimony at his trial was "inaccurate and misleading." They also note that a federal judge found in 2010 that a jailhouse informer's testimony that Davis confessed to killing MacPhail was "patently false" and that prosecutors knew a key eyewitness account was wrong.

    Right there we have 'issues'.........



    1. Who did the new analysis? Why did they conclude it was inaccurate? Any defense attorney can hire a forensic expert to dispute the evidence.

    2. What evidence did the judge have that the informer was lying? How could he/she possibly know that the prosecutors knew that a key eyewitness account was wrong? They had multiple witnesses anyway. Throwing out the testimony of two wouldn't have made a difference.
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    Sep 22, 2011 5:09 AM GMT
    DudeInNOVA said
    TropicalMark saidRavco.. just some other info you may not know about:

    A new analysis they say shows ballistics testimony at his trial was "inaccurate and misleading." They also note that a federal judge found in 2010 that a jailhouse informer's testimony that Davis confessed to killing MacPhail was "patently false" and that prosecutors knew a key eyewitness account was wrong.

    Right there we have 'issues'.........



    1. Who did the new analysis? Why did they conclude it was inaccurate? Any defense attorney can hire a forensic expert to dispute the evidence.

    2. What evidence did the judge have that the informer was lying? How could he/she possibly know that the prosecutors knew that a key eyewitness account was wrong? They had multiple witnesses anyway. Throwing out the testimony of two wouldn't have made a difference.
    7 of 9 recanted! I do not know the answers to your other questions.. none of us know, however IF questions are raised, we as a nation of justice need to have it vetted. With capital punishment there cannot be ANY doubt or mistakes.
    Don't get me wrong as I am a proponent of capital punishment.. done absolutely correct without doubt.