anyone read "to kill a mockingbird"?

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    Sep 24, 2011 4:38 AM GMT
    ...by harper lee? I havent read fiction in a while. Is it a good story?
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    Sep 24, 2011 5:27 AM GMT
    Did you grow up in the US? I'm just asking because it's hard to find someone who hasn't read the book or at least seen the movie because it's standard reading in schools across the country.


    It's considered a classic of American fiction but unlike other classics it's actually good. I would definitely recommend reading it.
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    Sep 24, 2011 5:35 AM GMT
    I did not. The store guy asked me what "kind" I wanted. Like, for school course? I gave him a blank stare.

    We studied 3 major languages growing up. There wasnt a whole lot of english literature for me.
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    Sep 24, 2011 5:48 AM GMT
    Yeah in that case I would definitely recommend it. To really appreciate it takes a certain bit of cultural knowledge concerning the Jim Crow laws of the American South and the Great Depression. Since you're not from the US originally you may not be familiar with this and how it affected life and race relations here. If that's the case then the plot may seem a bit strange and you might wonder why it is certain characters behave the way they do. But other than that I would highly recommend this book.
  • eastony

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    Sep 24, 2011 6:02 AM GMT
    It's a very interesting book, by a very special woman. Harper Lee only wrote three or four things that were ever published. One of them was To Kill a Mockingbird and it was by far the most elaborate and famous. The others were sort essays published in Harper's and Vogue.

    It is said that the experience in the book is almost autobiographical. Harper Lee was a life-long friend of gay icon, Truman Capote (who claimed to be the inspiration behind the novel's character of Dill, who is beloved by most readers) who said of Lee and To Kill a Mockingbird, "Someone rare has written this very fine first novel: a writer with the liveliest sense of life, and the warmest, most authentic sense of humor. A touching book; and so funny, so likeable."

    If you ever want to have a child, read this book before you try and be a dad. Atticus Finch is the most nobel and wonderful father in literature.
  • eastony

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    Sep 24, 2011 6:06 AM GMT
    Advaya saidI did not. The store guy asked me what "kind" I wanted. Like, for school course? I gave him a blank stare.

    We studied 3 major languages growing up. There wasnt a whole lot of english literature for me.


    When you get it, make sure you get the "original version". There is a new version that takes out the racist language and replaces it with more generic terms. I think the original is far more powerful, and really leaves an idea of how racist language can be so powerful.
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    Sep 24, 2011 6:10 AM GMT
    eastony said
    Advaya saidI did not. The store guy asked me what "kind" I wanted. Like, for school course? I gave him a blank stare.

    We studied 3 major languages growing up. There wasnt a whole lot of english literature for me.


    When you get it, make sure you get the "original version". There is a new version that takes out the racist language and replaces it with more generic terms. I think the original is far more powerful, and really leaves an idea of how racist language can be so powerful.


    Thanks for your great review. I did get the original version. I knew there is a newer one. The guy asked me what kind, after I had already told him that I wanted the old one. I did not know it's also used in schools here.

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    Sep 24, 2011 6:45 AM GMT
    The "bird" dies.

    Innocence is lost.

    This is a classic read.
  • Neurons

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    Sep 24, 2011 11:37 AM GMT
    Most schools in my province read it in High school. It's a great book!
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    Sep 24, 2011 12:05 PM GMT
    I think I'm the only person in the U.S that did not like the book at all & don't get me started on huck fin.
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    Sep 24, 2011 12:11 PM GMT
    It is required reading in the Canadian curriculum too.

    Partly because we were the destination for the Underground Railroad, but ostly because it is a very influential piece of literature.

    It is a book I keep on my shelf of favourite books - I have read it dozens of times.


    I did not know that Dill was modeled on Truman Capote!


    But I can see it!

    Yes (I think I always on some level recognized Dill was gay.



  • somedaytoo

    Posts: 704

    Sep 24, 2011 12:13 PM GMT
    I loved reading that book. My favorite thing about the story was the mysterious Boo.
  • BardBear

    Posts: 533

    Sep 24, 2011 12:17 PM GMT
    As a teacher, I've read it numerous times AND I've taught it. It is also one of the few where the book and the movie both have qualities worth admiration. It truly does discuss character and morals--but not in a GOP way, but in a way that says your actions define you.

    Atticus Finch is considered one of the characters in modern fiction.

    Have questions? Let me know.

    Peace,
    Bardy
  • cg220

    Posts: 208

    Sep 24, 2011 12:18 PM GMT
    It's a great book. Well written. That and The Count of Monte Cristo were my favorite books growing up.
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    Sep 24, 2011 1:57 PM GMT
    "had" to read it several times for classes. also read it on my own several times. even the incidental characters aren't incidental. not sure how a non-US person will understand it. it mesmerizes me. once i start it, i don't put it down until i'm finished.
  • eastony

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    Sep 29, 2011 2:27 PM GMT
    somedaytoo saidI loved reading that book. My favorite thing about the story was the mysterious Boo.


    icon_smile.gif Boo Radley, what a wonderful dude.
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    Sep 29, 2011 2:29 PM GMT
    A few times. The movie is also great.