Ford pulls bailout ad after criticism from press, questions from White House

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 27, 2011 10:28 PM GMT
    Is the White house not proud of their intervention in GM and Chrysler?

    Ford Motor Company has shelved a television commercial indirectly criticizing its competitors for accepting government bailouts to avoid bankruptcy in the wake of media criticism and, reportedly, a call from the White House.

    The ad, first uploaded to YouTube months ago, was part of a series featuring real-life customers who were thrust into press conferences where actor/reporters asked them to explain their decisions to buy a Ford.

    "I wasn't going to buy another car that was bailed out by our government," the customer, Chris, said in the ad. "I was going to buy from a manufacturer that's standing on their own: win, lose, or draw. That's what America is about is taking the chance to succeed and understanding when you fail that you gotta' pick yourself up and go back to work. Ford is that company for me."

    The ad came under fire earlier this month when various media outlets began to point out Ford's apparent hypocricy, noting that while the automaker did not receive a government bailout, CEO Alan Mulally urged Congress to aid the industry and accepted various federal loans.

    The Dearborn-based automaker is not commenting on the decision to pull the ad, but Daniel Howes of The Detroit News reports that "individuals within the White House" called Ford and questioned whether the spot criticized the policy Mulally had repeatedly supported.

    An industry source said the White House did not pressure Ford to remove the ad, but Howes suggested it was pulled in response to the call, an assertion the White House again denied this afternoon.

    More here:

    With President Barack Obama tuning his re-election campaign amid dismal economic conditions and simmering antipathy toward his stimulus spending and associated bailouts, the Ford ad carried the makings of a political liability when Team Obama can least afford yet another one. Can’t have that. The ad, pulled in response to White House questions (and, presumably, carping from rival GM), threatened to rekindle the negative (if accurate) association just when the president wants credit for their positive results (GM and Chrysler are moving forward, making money and selling vehicles) and to distance himself from any public downside of his decision. In other words, where presidential politics and automotive marketing collide — clean, green, politically correct vehicles not included — the president wins and the automaker loses because the benefit of the battle isn’t worth the cost of waging it.

    And here:

    Gosh, if I had a reporter in the White House press corps, I’d be sure to have them ask about this. After all, this situation highlights perfectly why bailouts are so un-American. I don’t care who you are or how you felt about the bailout in the first place: at the point that the President is pressuring competitors to government-owned companies to yank truth-telling ads, you’ve got to wonder what happened to this country.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 28, 2011 2:17 PM GMT
    At least one columnist asks more questions:

  • Sep 29, 2011 2:55 AM GMT
    Its great ford did this ! great marketing for them , many main street americans ( ford buyers ) do not agree with this chaos thats happening in Washington . Im actually a lil upset at ford for pulling the ad after obama admin frowned upon it.