First country to legalize gay marriage?

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    Sep 28, 2011 5:27 PM GMT
    OK all you RJ know-it-alls, here's the question: Name the first country in the world to legalize gay marriage and bonus points if you know the year. For extra credit, what year did Canada legalize same-sex marriages?
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    Sep 28, 2011 5:37 PM GMT
    The Netherlands. Passed 2000, effective 2001 (April i think).

    Canada: 2005
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    Sep 28, 2011 6:10 PM GMT
    tailgater_3 saidThe Netherlands. Passed 2000, effective 2001 (April i think).

    Canada: 2005


    Wrong answer on the first question; correct about Canada...
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    Sep 28, 2011 6:11 PM GMT
    Trollileo saidI thought it was Denmark 1989?

    Oh, that's cool. Gay buttsecks has been legal there since 1933.


    They were the first in recognizing same sex partnerships.
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    Sep 28, 2011 6:12 PM GMT
    Trollileo saidI thought it was Denmark 1989?



    Dind! Ding! Ding! We have a winner! And we all know how Denmark has just gone to the dogs since then, right?
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    Sep 28, 2011 6:13 PM GMT
    The Netherlands is a country where almost EVERYTHING is legal. So, my answer would be the same for the obvious reason
  • DanOmatic

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    Sep 28, 2011 6:22 PM GMT
    Technically, the Netherlands is the correct answer, since it was the first country to extend full marriage benefits to same sex couples (including adoption); Denmark was the first to extend domestic partner benefits. I think Belgium was the second nation to extend full marriage rights to homos.

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    Sep 28, 2011 6:32 PM GMT
    mocktwinkie said
    Trollileo saidI thought it was Denmark 1989?

    Oh, that's cool. Gay buttsecks has been legal there since 1933.


    They were the first in recognizing same sex partnerships.


    I stand corrected.
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    Sep 28, 2011 6:34 PM GMT
    NC3athlete saidTechnically, the Netherlands is the correct answer, since it was the first country to extend full marriage benefits to same sex couples (including adoption); Denmark was the first to extend domestic partner benefits. I think Belgium was the second nation to extend full marriage rights to homos.



    Thanks for the clarification. Can gay and lesbian couples marry in the Protestant churches in The Netherlands - we know they can't in the R.C. ones - or just civil marriages?
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    Sep 28, 2011 6:36 PM GMT
    NC3athlete saidTechnically, the Netherlands is the correct answer, since it was the first country to extend full marriage benefits to same sex couples (including adoption); Denmark was the first to extend domestic partner benefits. I think Belgium was the second nation to extend full marriage rights to homos.



    Ah, that good old question, when is a marriage not a marriage? It was fought in the British courts by a lesbian couple who got married when they lived in Vancouver... When they moved home to the UK they said We don't have a Civil Partnership thanks, we have a marriage. Sadly, the courts said, Oh no you don't.
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    Sep 28, 2011 6:47 PM GMT
    Here's splitting hairs: I cheated and looked on line just now: seems while the Netherlands recognized no different between same or opposite sex marriages in 2000 (I think I have this correct...), the Danish Church (Lutheran) okayed same-sex ceremonies performed in 1997. So will it be the authorities or people themselves - gay and straight - who decides what to call it?

    Can see down the road that domestic partnerships - now there's a phrase dreamed up by a bureaucrat - and civil unions will be folded under the umbrella of marriage and we won't have this distinctive separation/semantics.

    Thoughts?
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    Sep 28, 2011 6:48 PM GMT
    cdncuteboy said
    NC3athlete saidTechnically, the Netherlands is the correct answer, since it was the first country to extend full marriage benefits to same sex couples (including adoption); Denmark was the first to extend domestic partner benefits. I think Belgium was the second nation to extend full marriage rights to homos.



    Ah, that good old question, when is a marriage not a marriage? It was fought in the British courts by a lesbian couple who got married when they lived in Vancouver... When they moved home to the UK they said We don't have a Civil Partnership thanks, we have a marriage. Sadly, the courts said, Oh no you don't.


    Didn't know this. See how interesting it can be here on RJ. And the other hot guys who enlighten us?...
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    Sep 28, 2011 6:58 PM GMT
    South Africa since 2006...not bad hey?

    From Wiki:
    In 2001, the Netherlands became the first nation in the world to grant same-sex marriages.[60] Same-sex marriages are also granted and mutually recognized by Belgium (2003),[61] Spain (2005), Canada (2005), South Africa (2006), Norway (2009), Sweden (2009), Portugal (2010),[62] Iceland (2010) and Argentina (2010). In Mexico same sex marriage is recognized in all 31 states but only performed in Mexico City. In Nepal, their recognition has been judicially mandated but not yet legislated.[63] 250 million people (or 4% of the world population) live in areas that recognise same-sex marriage.
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    Sep 28, 2011 6:59 PM GMT
    UTAH?
  • DanOmatic

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    Sep 28, 2011 8:30 PM GMT
    yankinbc saidHere's splitting hairs: I cheated and looked on line just now: seems while the Netherlands recognized no different between same or opposite sex marriages in 2000 (I think I have this correct...), the Danish Church (Lutheran) okayed same-sex ceremonies performed in 1997. So will it be the authorities or people themselves - gay and straight - who decides what to call it?

    Can see down the road that domestic partnerships - now there's a phrase dreamed up by a bureaucrat - and civil unions will be folded under the umbrella of marriage and we won't have this distinctive separation/semantics.

    Thoughts?


    Either way, it's a good thing, but the mandate of the law puts the greater stamp of legitimacy on the notion of marriage rights. We have churches here in NC that will gladly perform gay weddings, but meanwhile the Neanderthals in the General Assembly (not content with a law already on the books that only recognizes marriage between one man and one woman) want to ensure that the state constitution explicity prohibits gay marriage. So for me, just because the Danish Lutheran Church okayed same-sex cermonies, it's still not tantamount to law. Denmark does not offer full marriage status to same sex couples, though it does provide domestic partnership rights.

    To your previous question about Dutch Protestant Churches, I would venture a guess that most would perform gay marriages (there are some very conservative Protestant churches, though), and there are many very progressive Catholic churches which, were it not for Rome's strictures, would probably perform them. However, most Dutch people never set foot in a church, so it wouldn't matter to most of them, since most weddings are performed in the town hall.

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    Sep 28, 2011 9:20 PM GMT
    i'm not familiar w/ other countries' laws, yet, in the States marriage is a secular activity. a marriage license, issued through a governmental entity, is required. the same holds true for civil unions. that is a basic argument in favor of same-sex marriage in the US. id est, because marriage is secular and state sanctioned, all ppl are equal under the law.