Thinking positively while losing your job

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    Sep 29, 2011 4:28 AM GMT
    Just found out today officially that I have been 'displaced' by another worker with more seniority who was displaced by another worker. However I am not worried, feel I can still give, volunteer, etc. and will find a new job. Has anyone else felt this way when loosing a job? Curious...
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    Sep 29, 2011 5:05 AM GMT
    Working in the tech industry, I've been laid off a few times over the years. After the second time, I stopped worrying. Because somehow, I do manage to get another job. So my suggestion to anyone that lost their job is to take a week off to relax and regroup. When you're relaxed and ready to go, set up a daily schedule for yourself.

    Spend an hour or two each day searching/applying for jobs.

    Spend the rest of your day improving yourself. Take some courses at your local community college, learn some new skills or refresh your existing skills. Or volunteer your time for a charitable cause. Or get some stuff done around the house.

    Also, get in touch with family/friends you haven't seen in a while. Catch up over lunch/dinner. Staying at home all day really sucks the motivation out. You need to interact with people and socialize. Helps keep your mind off the fact that you're not working. Also, your family/friends might have leads for job opportunities through people they know.

    And consider taking a mini vacation. With laptops and cell phones and other forms of technology, you don't have to be stuck at home searching/applying for jobs. You can do it at the beach as long as you have wifi or mobile broadband. icon_cool.gif
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    Sep 29, 2011 5:10 AM GMT
    Yes; my career ended at 47. Avocations took over.

    -Doug


    "But yield who will to their separation,
    My object in living is to unite
    My avocation and my vocation
    As my two eyes make one in sight.
    Only where love and need are one,
    And the work is play for mortal stakes,
    Is the deed ever really done
    For heaven and the future´s sakes."

    —Robert Frost, Two Tramps in Mud Time
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    Sep 29, 2011 7:55 AM GMT
    xrichx saidWorking in the tech industry, I've been laid off a few times over the years. After the second time, I stopped worrying. Because somehow, I do manage to get another job. So my suggestion to anyone that lost their job is to take a week off to relax and regroup. When you're relaxed and ready to go, set up a daily schedule for yourself.

    Spend an hour or two each day searching/applying for jobs.

    Spend the rest of your day improving yourself. Take some courses at your local community college, learn some new skills or refresh your existing skills. Or volunteer your time for a charitable cause. Or get some stuff done around the house.

    Also, get in touch with family/friends you haven't seen in a while. Catch up over lunch/dinner. Staying at home all day really sucks the motivation out. You need to interact with people and socialize. Helps keep your mind off the fact that you're not working. Also, your family/friends might have leads for job opportunities through people they know.

    And consider taking a mini vacation. With laptops and cell phones and other forms of technology, you don't have to be stuck at home searching/applying for jobs. You can do it at the beach as long as you have wifi or mobile broadband. icon_cool.gif


    Very savvy advice. I have plenty of projects to keep me occupied (write for a newspaper and an online GLBT magazine, versmagazine - both for free but it keeps me occupied and mind stimulated), a husband who loves me and a great bull terrier. I do have some store-up vacation time so your idea is a good one to take some time. Again thanks for the advice and will let you know. Hospital is offering me either the OR - but the shifts are all over the board - or ICU (12 hour shifts... but less hours per week). Also, can pick-up casual work in hospital as well.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Sep 29, 2011 7:57 AM GMT
    thank ur god obama first.
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    Sep 29, 2011 11:17 AM GMT
    I've been thinking about how amazing this would be for me. I mean it'd suck from an ego perspective, BUT...I'd probably get at least six months of severance which basically means a three month vacation...

    I'd take the time to milk that severance and see people and perhaps the world. It seems like there's a lot of positive and a lot of negative, unless you know, you actually were passionate about that particular job..
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    Sep 29, 2011 11:25 AM GMT
    I lost my job in December of 2010 and was given a years severance. It was the best thing that ever happened to me. I was ecstatic. I had no passion for the job, just the money I was being paid. It has worked out. I am now looking for another full time gig (I took a little too much time off), but I've been doing some consulting on the side just to make some extra money. I am kind of dreading going back to the 9-5 grind, but it was great to have all this time off!

    Oh plus I think (I was not eligible due to a severance), you can collect unemployment for like 99 weeks. I know a bunch of people who went back to school, etc....and really rode it out.
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    Sep 29, 2011 11:59 AM GMT
    xrichx saidWorking in the tech industry, I've been laid off a few times over the years. After the second time, I stopped worrying. Because somehow, I do manage to get another job. So my suggestion to anyone that lost their job is to take a week off to relax and regroup. When you're relaxed and ready to go, set up a daily schedule for yourself.

    Spend an hour or two each day searching/applying for jobs.

    Spend the rest of your day improving yourself. Take some courses at your local community college, learn some new skills or refresh your existing skills. Or volunteer your time for a charitable cause. Or get some stuff done around the house.

    Also, get in touch with family/friends you haven't seen in a while. Catch up over lunch/dinner. Staying at home all day really sucks the motivation out. You need to interact with people and socialize. Helps keep your mind off the fact that you're not working. Also, your family/friends might have leads for job opportunities through people they know.

    And consider taking a mini vacation. With laptops and cell phones and other forms of technology, you don't have to be stuck at home searching/applying for jobs. You can do it at the beach as long as you have wifi or mobile broadband. icon_cool.gif


    Well said! By the second layoff, its doesn't shake me one bit. Just move on to the next! Sometimes I wonder if the economy will ever pick up. I had to go abroad to find employment. Yet it is a great expereince for me having never worked long term outside the US. Change is good, and better than you think! icon_smile.gif Adaptability brings stability in ways you don't think possible! But it does icon_smile.gif
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    Sep 29, 2011 12:01 PM GMT
    Thinking positively is exactly the right thing to do. My philosophy is:

    there will always be a job available for a good worker
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    Sep 29, 2011 12:04 PM GMT
    http://fozzy42.com/SoundClips/Movies/Airplane/glue.wavicon_cool.gif

    icon_lol.gif
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    Sep 29, 2011 7:57 PM GMT
    rjb2001 said
    xrichx saidWorking in the tech industry, I've been laid off a few times over the years. After the second time, I stopped worrying. Because somehow, I do manage to get another job. So my suggestion to anyone that lost their job is to take a week off to relax and regroup. When you're relaxed and ready to go, set up a daily schedule for yourself.

    Spend an hour or two each day searching/applying for jobs.

    Spend the rest of your day improving yourself. Take some courses at your local community college, learn some new skills or refresh your existing skills. Or volunteer your time for a charitable cause. Or get some stuff done around the house.

    Also, get in touch with family/friends you haven't seen in a while. Catch up over lunch/dinner. Staying at home all day really sucks the motivation out. You need to interact with people and socialize. Helps keep your mind off the fact that you're not working. Also, your family/friends might have leads for job opportunities through people they know.

    And consider taking a mini vacation. With laptops and cell phones and other forms of technology, you don't have to be stuck at home searching/applying for jobs. You can do it at the beach as long as you have wifi or mobile broadband. icon_cool.gif


    I agree. I went 'abroad' to live in Canada with my bf/now husband. Been underemployed since 2007...But love change and all that it brings with it: hope, determination, etc. I think hubby would have a few things to say if I moved again...lol

    Well said! By the second layoff, its doesn't shake me one bit. Just move on to the next! Sometimes I wonder if the economy will ever pick up. I had to go abroad to find employment. Yet it is a great expereince for me having never worked long term outside the US. Change is good, and better than you think! icon_smile.gif Adaptability brings stability in ways you don't think possible! But it does icon_smile.gif
  • benarw

    Posts: 128

    Sep 29, 2011 9:00 PM GMT
    I'm in the same boat...more or less. I was laid off from a job I didn't realize was making me miserable until I left and everyone started commenting on how much happier I was. Then I was on unemployment for about 6 months then finally found a crap day job and got off unemployment. I just recently quit that job because I hated it and the hours kept getting fewer and fewer. So now I'm back to the serious job hunt, have had a couple of really good interviews, and am feeling better about things. I have good and bad moments. Sometimes I don't wanna get out of bed, other's I'm great. You just have to keep your spirits up and know that something good will come in time. And make sure you get out and enjoy life and friends and family in the meantime.
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    Sep 29, 2011 9:05 PM GMT
    I really feel for you, and I like this thread.

    I have not lost my job but was forced to take a retail manager position when the economy first showed signs of slowing down.

    Since then I have attained my bachelors of science in IT/Security Systems in the middle of a really bad double dip recession. I am having more than a hard time finding a decent tech job willing to hire a college grad.

    Big businesses are holding onto their money and not training anyone right now. So I discovered volunteering which has reall helped my well being because it is very uplifting.
  • jperfit

    Posts: 593

    Sep 29, 2011 9:15 PM GMT
    yeah some people would say that because your unemployed your no longer employable which is just dumb.
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    Sep 30, 2011 2:02 AM GMT
    I didn't lose my job, but did struggle to find one for quite some time. And like people have said, improving yourself should be your top priority (well, right behind applying for jobs).

    When the job search had me down, I would kick my rear-end with a long, hard run or workout. And after that, I not only felt accomplished, but managed to clear my head enough to plan my next move. So, if you're like me, you'll benefit from improving yourself both physically and mentally.
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    Sep 30, 2011 2:07 AM GMT
    Don't "give" or "volunteer." Update your resume and hit the street.
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    Sep 30, 2011 2:10 AM GMT
    When I lost a job once, I was extremely happy... it was a horrible company to work for with terrible hours, conditions and pay... and I only stuck around due to my exaggerated faithfulness.. I tend to do that alot... stay faithful to companies I should really leave.. and wound up wasting a lot of time working for people who really did not deserve my loyalty or services..

    Basically, Im just too nice