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  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 29, 2011 12:06 PM GMT
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  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 29, 2011 2:18 PM GMT
    There's anew trend that is "natural" Burrial. No embalming, no casket, you just get thrown in the ground with burlap. I'm leaning toward this or creamation.
    I really think plots, caskets and monuments are a waste of money.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 29, 2011 2:22 PM GMT
    I want to be taken to a taxidermist and placed into a useful position so my friends and relatives can enjoy me long after I am gone.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 29, 2011 2:33 PM GMT
    S60turbo saidI really think plots, caskets and monuments are a waste of money.

    Nothing lasts forever. Not a grave, not a monument, not the Earth itself.

    A cemetery plot gives comfort to the immediate survivors. In 100 years the descendants, if any, will hardly know who this person was, and seldom visit the gravesite.

    My partner & I have chosen cremation. Our remains don't need to clutter-up the world. They eventually disintegrate, anyway, to nothing really meaningful. Our ashes may be enshrined somewhere for a while, but eventually they'll be lost to time. I'd rather mine be scattered right away, their ultimate fate anyway.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 29, 2011 3:20 PM GMT
    Embalming goes back to the time of ancient Egypt.

    Why do we still do it today? Usually for two reasons - You can't have a cadaver in a casket for days with blood and gases staying in the body to be put on display. It also prevents the spread of infection.

    I used to work in a funeral home. In Canada we don't have morticians - we have licensed Funeral Directors. As well, it is not required by law to embalm a corpse. But You would have to make arrangements and have visitation with open casket VERY quickly without it.

    S60 Turbo: This is news to me - Many cemeteries in Ontario require you to have an outer container when being buried. Cremation for certain requires you to be in a container (read: minimum - cardboard box)

  • BlackBeltGuy

    Posts: 2609

    Sep 29, 2011 6:35 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    S60turbo saidI really think plots, caskets and monuments are a waste of money.

    Nothing lasts forever. Not a grave, not a monument, not the Earth itself.

    A cemetery plot gives comfort to the immediate survivors. In 100 years the descendants, if any, will hardly know who this person was, and seldom visit the gravesite.

    My partner & I have chosen cremation. Our remains don't need to clutter-up the world. They eventually disintegrate, anyway, to nothing really meaningful. Our ashes may be enshrined somewhere for a while, but eventually they'll be lost to time. I'd rather mine be scattered right away, their ultimate fate anyway.


    I AGREE
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Sep 29, 2011 6:38 PM GMT
    DolGe, laws do vary. In many instances here in the US the funeral industry has tried to create the impression that many services are necessary and legally required, while that is not necessarily the case.

    The cosmetology practiced by mortuaries is said to present a more pleasing picture to a grieving family. Perhaps it does, but it is for certain that once the funeral is over it serves no purpose.

    Today's economic situation is influencing decisions about funerals. I would hate to think that the disposal of remains would be a great financial burden after I die.
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Sep 29, 2011 6:54 PM GMT
    I want to be cremated, then have my ashes planted under a tree or in a garden somewhere. Maybe a fruit tree, so I can have people eat me in a manner of speaking icon_razz.gif
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Sep 29, 2011 7:04 PM GMT
    normal cremation is actually really bad for the environment

    Since it takes two to four hours at temperatures ranging from 1,400 and 2,100 F, or 760 and 1,150 C, the estimated energy required to cremate one body is roughly equal to the amount of fuel required to drive 4,800 miles, or 7,725 kilometers.

    Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide are spewed in large volume, along with carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, particulate matter, heavy metals, dioxins and furans.

    There is also release of cadmium and lead from pacemakers and mercury from dental amalgams. Total mercury emissions from cremation in Canada for 2004 were between 240 and 907 pounds, or 109 and 411.6 kilograms.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 29, 2011 8:46 PM GMT
    Just dump me in the ocean.

    And recycle any pacemakers, teeth fillings, artificial hips/knees, brain implants, and/or left ventricular assist devices out of me first. (not that I'll need it, or consent to get them implanted in the first place) icon_razz.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 29, 2011 10:55 PM GMT

    S60 Turbo: This is news to me - Many cemeteries in Ontario require you to have an outer container when being buried. Cremation for certain requires you to be in a container (read: minimum - cardboard box)


    I think I read it was in California
    It ws on the internet................it must be true.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 30, 2011 6:39 AM GMT
    burn me...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 30, 2011 6:43 AM GMT
    I have my funeral all planned out

    3342748785_65a569bf82.jpg

    Now I just need a necrophiliac hottie to kiss my corpse icon_redface.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 30, 2011 6:48 AM GMT
    Ariodante saidI have my funeral all planned out

    3342748785_65a569bf82.jpg

    Now I just need a necrophiliac hottie to kiss my corpse icon_redface.gif


    And seven elderly men with legal mineral rites to a diamond mine.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 30, 2011 7:12 AM GMT
    Cash said

    And seven elderly men with legal mineral rites to a diamond mine.


    A girl can dream icon_eek.gif

    stack_of_money.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 30, 2011 9:29 AM GMT
    My will says to bake me and then scatter me somewhere.
    No open casket drama or overwrought services or displays.
    I don't need to hang around and remind people I'm gone.
    The memory for the immediate living should be enough.
    After that, no one even knows you.
  • somedaytoo

    Posts: 704

    Sep 30, 2011 10:18 AM GMT
    Wood chipper............kidding
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 30, 2011 11:22 AM GMT
    LJay said

    The cosmetology practiced by mortuaries is said to present a more pleasing picture to a grieving family. Perhaps it does, but it is for certain that once the funeral is over it serves no purpose.

    I don't really get that. I don't feel like going into detail, but I can honestly say that I prefer the whole reality of death to the makeup being done and mouth wired shut. There is something much more immediate and real when death is presented in it's true form and I think it is much easier to "heal" knowing the person is gone. I am sick of hearing "he / she looked so peaceful; just as though they were sleeping" uttered at a funeral.

    To each their own- but my preference is for the reality of death over the fiction. I have no use for the modern swing towards funeral homes presenting a "perfect" body and using every method possible to prevent anybody from suspecting the corpse may indeed be lifeless.

    If you read Mark Twains essay "the death of Jean" you will find that they laid his daughter out on the sofa in the home. That is closer to the reality that I consider to be worthy of consideration. It is still respectful and still allows those closest to say their "goodbye's" but does so with none of the pretense that most "professionals" bring to the industry of death.
  • cremationadi

    Posts: 2

    Jan 20, 2012 9:09 AM GMT
    you can use diamond jewelry...after body liquefaction.... greener way of cremation ....
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 20, 2012 12:45 PM GMT
    Just be aware of what happens if you select cremation without embalming and decline an open-casket wake. (Yes, some people to be cremated still specify the viewing thing first, for which embalming is required on health grounds in the US, even though they won't be buried afterwards but cremated)

    When my partner died in a nursing home they called a mortician of my choice. He told me to take my "leave-taking" right there at the bedside, because when he left with the remains I'd never see my partner again. Those went directly to the crematorium, since there was a valid death certificate (he'd been on life support for 2 days, his death already inevitable when I ordered the "plug" pulled, so that all the legal steps were in place)

    I guess I didn't fully anticipate this leave-taking thing, somehow I imagined I'd see my partner again in some other setting. It really ripped me apart, I cried uncontrollably, and maybe that's another reason some families arrange for a viewing. Within about an hour of his death, or maybe it was as much as 90 minutes, my mind wasn't clearly focused at that point, they took him away and he was gone from my life forever.

    So be aware if you or your partner/husband have specified cremation without viewing, in the US things happen very quickly after death. More quickly then you may expect, and are prepared emotionally to handle.
  • blueandgold

    Posts: 396

    Jan 20, 2012 1:09 PM GMT
    west77 said
    LJay said

    The cosmetology practiced by mortuaries is said to present a more pleasing picture to a grieving family. Perhaps it does, but it is for certain that once the funeral is over it serves no purpose.

    I don't really get that. I don't feel like going into detail, but I can honestly say that I prefer the whole reality of death to the makeup being done and mouth wired shut. There is something much more immediate and real when death is presented in it's true form and I think it is much easier to "heal" knowing the person is gone. I am sick of hearing "he / she looked so peaceful; just as though they were sleeping" uttered at a funeral.

    To each their own- but my preference is for the reality of death over the fiction. I have no use for the modern swing towards funeral homes presenting a "perfect" body and using every method possible to prevent anybody from suspecting the corpse may indeed be lifeless.

    If you read Mark Twains essay "the death of Jean" you will find that they laid his daughter out on the sofa in the home. That is closer to the reality that I consider to be worthy of consideration. It is still respectful and still allows those closest to say their "goodbye's" but does so with none of the pretense that most "professionals" bring to the industry of death.


    I understand your sentiment, man. But... I don't know how much death you've been around. I've had the unfortunate privilege of being around tons of it through my work/former work. In the Army and as a police officer, you see lots of death. Its ugly, its messy, and it smells real real bad. Bodies bloat, they collect flies, flesh falls off the skin.

    Also, its a relative biological hazard. Unless a funeral is conducted almost immediately (which is done in some cultures), the body becomes almost intolerable to be around. Most people can't be around it due to the smell alone.

    But hahaa if this is truly what you want to inflict on your loved ones when you die, have at it man. Try to put yourself in a funny/awful position before rigor mortis sets in, and give your relatives a treat.

  • Delivis

    Posts: 2332

    Jan 20, 2012 2:53 PM GMT
    javalava saidIs this procedure done in virtually the U.S. and Canada bizarre? How do you feel about open-casket funerals?
    Morticians do all sorts of things to corpses, like replacing blood with some fluid.


    I find it very bizzarre on the face of it, but very normal in the context of all of the other death rituals of the world.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 20, 2012 5:00 PM GMT
    I'm not a fan of embalming/wakes... the last few funerals we've been through, which have been relatives of my BF, we had an hour or so with the body before the cremation society came, and that was it. With his father the funeral was two weeks later (with my band of which he had been a member providing most of the music) and with his grandfather there will only be a committal service in the spring.

    We go in the ground in the churchyard, there is no "grave" other than your name added to a bronze marker on the outside of the church. I had considered getting a cremains vault in St. John the Divine in NYC but -- as others have mentioned -- what for?

    I had no idea about the environmental impact of cremation being that high, I am surprised there is not more done in the way of air filtration esp in urban areas, but no matter how you choose to "go" you are going to cause some kind of impact.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 20, 2012 5:20 PM GMT
    In most of the states, law dictates that if a body is not disposed of within 24 hours, it must be embalmed. So, if it isn't "on ice", and if the burial or cremation doesn't occur within 24 hours, the embalming is required by law.

    If you've ever been around a dead body, you will know why it must be done so quickly.

    Also, since the funeral, wake, burial, etc takes place long before a will is probated, and since wills are not always read immediately, the means of disposal dictated in a will doesn't really matter. As a lawyer told me, once you're dead, you have no say in what happens to you. The only say you have is what happens to your estate.

    Also, in many states, a pre-need (prepaid final expenses) guarantees nothing except that the costs will not inflate. If you have a pre-need, the family can still go against it and do as they wish in your final arrangements. The only thing, is that they will not receive the money you paid or be able to have it applied to final expenses unless they follow the directive to the very letter.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 21, 2012 2:28 PM GMT
    Just bury me face down in the median strip of either I-10, or I-40 so the entire country from coast to coast can kiss my ass!