Transcendental Meditation

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    Sep 29, 2011 3:02 PM GMT
    I am wondering if anyone has tried this or spent the money to learn? It is quite expensive at $1500.00, but I have been researching and heard it is life changing.
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    Sep 29, 2011 3:44 PM GMT
    You're better off attending a Dzogchen meditation retreat. I did this for a lot less than $1500 and had an amazing experience.
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    Sep 29, 2011 4:11 PM GMT
    DO NOT spend $1500...........but I do think you'll find meditation helpful, and even life-changing.

    I learned meditation through TM....but for much less money at the time. But since my start I have learned that TM is simply an expensive 'brand name' for the very reliable form of meditation which employs a mantra----the repetition of a sound.

    You may be able to teach yourself to practice meditation but most of us have benefitted from a teacher.

    From my experience, Meditation is worth at least $1500......but you don't need to pay that much. And many teachers are happy to help you learn for FREE.
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    Sep 29, 2011 5:17 PM GMT
    All i know about it is from David Lynch who is a huge advocate of TM.

    I just don't understand why they charge so much money to learn it, kinda takes away from the appeal.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Sep 29, 2011 6:38 PM GMT
    The Buddhist monk had a toothache, so he went to his dentist for help. After the exam and x-rays, he was told he'd need a filling. He decided he didn't want any novocaine. When asked why, he said he wanted to transcend dental medication.

    ba-dum bum
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    Sep 30, 2011 1:15 AM GMT
    I was initiated by my brother when I was 13, and I've lived in Fairfield Iowa, center of all things TM in the USA, since I was 21. I got to the point where I simply couldn't make myself meditate any more, and I stopped a long time ago. But, IMO, it is a good basic meditation technique for those who need it, and I think it is unfortunate that they slapped such a high price on it.

    Sri Sri Ravi Shankar's Art of Living organization teaches a meditation technique that is essentially identical to TM, and I'm pretty sure they only charge a few hundred dollars.
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    Sep 30, 2011 1:29 AM GMT
    Ugh, just another ploy to make something that in India is dispensed completely free into a commercialised commodity to make money off of...

    Seriously, it does not matter what form of meditation you use... I have learned several from simple books and it cost me a few bucks... In addition, most temples Ive been into will let you practice with them entirely free of charge
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Sep 30, 2011 1:32 AM GMT
    If money is involved, it's scam.
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    Sep 30, 2011 1:34 AM GMT
    PresentMind saidDO NOT spend $1500...........but I do think you'll find meditation helpful, and even life-changing.

    I learned meditation through TM....but for much less money at the time. But since my start I have learned that TM is simply an expensive 'brand name' for the very reliable form of meditation which employs a mantra----the repetition of a sound.

    You may be able to teach yourself to practice meditation but most of us have benefitted from a teacher.

    From my experience, Meditation is worth at least $1500......but you don't need to pay that much. And many teachers are happy to help you learn for FREE.


    Im pretty sure alot of people on RJ will tell you for free... we've had whole threads explaining how to go about meditating on here... I know I posted it several times
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    Oct 04, 2011 2:37 PM GMT
    A lot of people say: "save your money, all the meditations are the same" but that was not my experience. I tried other meditations before learning TM and there is a big, big difference. TM is enjoyable and really refreshes you while other meditations I tried were tedious and boring with no noticeable results. TM is expensive, but I've always found that you get what you pay for. Sure, if you look around there will always be somebody claiming they have something just as good for half the price, but that's usually not true. Also the TM people have scholarships and grants if you cant afford the fee. One of the best things about TM is the personal instruction and free follow up sessions for life. That makes a huge difference. If you are really interested in meditation and its benefits, TM is the way to go in my opinion.
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    Oct 04, 2011 6:35 PM GMT
    I will help anyone learn to meditate for FREE.......for my own selfish reason:

    I believe our world becomes a better place with each new person who learns a technique to relax and LISTEN to their own inner guidance.

    Meditation is not the only worthwhile practice to help you achieve a calmer state, allowing your mind to function more smoothly. But it is a simple one that doesn't involve equipment and you'll be able to use it anywhere, anytime.

    As I say, I'm glad to help and I suspect most anyone else who has meditated and felt the benefits will also help you for FREE.

    Just ask.
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    Oct 05, 2011 11:41 AM GMT
    Yes TM is a fantastic meditation technique and well worth the investment. it is something you can do every day and the benefits come quite quickly, so you see the results. And there are loads of scientific studies demonstrating its value to all areas of health and wellbeing - and god for your brain. Check out the web-site www.TM.org. Hope you decide to learn.COLORED TEXT GOES HERERESIZED TEXT GOES HERE
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    Oct 05, 2011 12:11 PM GMT
    Maharishi was no fool when it came to making money. The guru amassed a global spiritual empire that included assets valued in the billions.

    TMers often make ridiculous claims, such as that their mass meditation somehow helped to bring down Berlin Wall and end of the Cold War.

    However, TM critics see the group’s practices as little more than self-hypnosis or trance induction.

    The Middle European Journal of Medicine found that out of 700 studies on TM spanning 40 years, only 10 were conducted in the clinical tradition of using strict control groups, randomization and placebos. Of those 10, four of the studies recruited subjects that had already shown an interest in TM.

    Peter Canter a researcher from the Peninsula Medical School of the Universities of Exeter and Plymouth in the United Kingdom concluded, ”there is a strong placebo effect going on which probably works through the expectations being set up.”

    TMers have nevertheless continued to make preposterous claims, for example that their “technologies” can create an “all-powerful field of invincibility” that will “make any nation invincible.”

    These claims certainly contradict what happened at Maharishi University in Iowa, where a student went berserk, viciously attacking and ultimately murdering another pupil.

    Whatever supposed mystical benefits occur from TM helped neither of them avoid this tragedy.

    In 2004 lawsuits were filed against Maharishi U alleging the school was “negligent” and failed to protect its students properly from the murderer, who was known to be violent reported the Associated Press.

    Just this month the University quietly settled one lawsuit for an undisclosed amount.

    The one time TMer turned murderer who was found not guilty by reason of insanity.
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    Oct 05, 2011 12:15 PM GMT
    I am good at copy/paste...

    The climate of the 60s: America was to question everything, challenge “the system” and the established world view.

    Experimenting with sex and drugs, toying with every new or forbidden philosophy. A better world was around the corner – we were sure of it. Soon we’d be, as Arlo sang, “walking hand in hand with every man, sleeping in the sun with everyone.”


    What happened?



    Where have all the flower children gone?

    Some became followers of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the founder of Transcendental Meditation (TM) and the Students International Meditation Society (SIMS), an organization that descended on US campuses, recruited kids and cleaned them up, turning them into “upstanding members of society.”


    TM gave them a mantra and taught them to meditate.

    Hippies turned TM converts, trading in swear words for mantras, tie-dyed shirts for three-piece suits.

    Many kids were recruited to become teachers, pulling in still more people.

    In 1975, Merv Griffin featured Maharishi (1975 photo right) on his prime-time TV show then started TM himself. First promoted by the Beatles, the giggling guru’s meditation program went mainstream, with courses taught in corporations and schools so that executives could relax and students could focus.

    A virtual army of TM teachers covered the globe, with centers in every major city, talks in every suburb. Maharishi said that world peace would happen – better yet, an ideal world – when enough people globally found inner peace by practicing TM.


    I was among that army, personally instructing 350 people in the course of six years.

    I fell in love with a starry-eyed boy, and we were going to create utopia together.

    We preached the message of transcendence: taking the mind inward to bask in its Source, the state of pure awareness, from which all good things spring. We drank of those waters daily. Refreshed from contact with the supreme, we’d return to the world energized for more lectures and teaching.


    It was a glorious time. Hope was everywhere. Gone was the contentiousness of our generation. We were avant-garde leaders now, shouting a new message, a new answer, to the world.

    Challenging authority became a thing of the past. (Maharishi taught that people should respect it..) Working within the system, we were told we would bring about change, and change would happen by raising people’s consciousness.

    Get them all to meditate, and problems would vanish from this earth.

    We truly believed it. The idea was radical, new, and to our young minds it made sense.

    TM opened a brand-new vista on the future, where troubles, all supposedly born of man’s separation from his pure infinite nature, would spontaneously disappear.

    The ex-hippie TM army was passionate: our full love and energy went into achieving Maharishi’s dream for the world.


    Recruits who didn’t feel called to become teachers found their way in businesses and vocations, becoming productive members of society. Those from wealthy families supported the movement with gargantuan donations, and received places of influence directly under Maharishi. It was only a matter of time until the world would be transformed and mankind would enter a New Age. Maharishi called it The Age of Enlightenment.


    But something happened on the way to paradise.

    Slowly and subtly, the tone of the guru’s teachings changed.

    What used to be 20 minutes twice a day became hour-long, then 90-minute, meditations. The mantras were reshaped into “advanced techniques,” and chanting and Vedic readings (hymns to the gods) began.

    In a bold move, Maharishi began teaching courses in TM-Siddhis, a slew of paranormal abilities which he said humans could develop. Turning invisible was one of the siddhis; levitation was another.


    People that took the siddhi training, were told that it would elevate their consciousness. But instead of flying, people were bouncing around cross-legged on foam rubber mats on their posteriors.

    Flying is coming, Maharishi promised – keep practicing: frog-hopping is only the beginning stage.

    No one turned invisible, and no one demonstrated any of the other special abilities the several-thousand-dollar siddhi course was supposed to teach.

    At the time of this writing, 30 years after the inception of the TM-siddhis, no one in Maharishi’s organization has yet demonstrated any levitation beyond frog-hopping.


    Meanwhile the movement snapped photos of smiling butt-bouncers (photo right) caught in mid-air and plastered the pictures on posters and fliers as advertisements: “Come learn yogic flying.”

    TM teachers who completed siddhi training were called “Governors of the Age of Enlightenment,” because Maharishi said our elevated consciousness would regulate negative tendencies in the world. Governors were told not to reveal to TM teachers or meditators that butt-bouncing was all that was being achieved on the siddhi courses to date.. That would spoil the innocence of the new initiates, interfering with their ability to learn.


    For the first time, more than a few disciples started questioning. Why was TM deceitful in its advertising, pretending that people were flying?

    Why were we asked to pay thousands of dollars for something that didn’t work?

    And how had a simple meditation technique, that was supposed to be all we needed for cosmic consciousness, gotten so complicated?


    Originally, we signed on for a non-religious “relaxation technique,” practiced a few minutes twice daily as an adjunct to dynamic activity.

    TM had its roots in Hinduism, but we had ignored that.

    As teachers or “initiators,” we had to perform a “puja,” a ritual of offerings performed on an altar before a picture of Guru Dev, Maharishi’s master. We were ordered to do this in the presence of every new initiate before dispensing their mantra. We were to kneel down and bow before the picture, making a hand gesture to indicate that the student was expected to kneel down, too.


    At the time we teachers convinced ourselves that we weren’t being deceptive. Maharishi said the initiates would understand in time, after their consciousness was raised through meditation. He repeatedly told us that TM was not a religion. As if saying it enough would make it so!


    But when the TM-Siddhis started, things got even more religious.

    We were instructed to read prayers to the gods after every meditation and to listen to audiotapes of chants to Hindu deities as we fell asleep at night. Maharishi reassured us: the gods are not actual personal entities but “impulses of creative intelligence” that exist within ourselves. The fact that Hinduism anthropomorphizes deities, just signals immature consciousness he said, and that of course was something the movement was far too sophisticated to be guilty of.


    The changes in the movement were so gradual that I hardly blinked an eye the day I got my own advanced technique, which consisted of adding the Sanskrit word “namah” to my original mantra. I didn’t quite understand, as I was told the mantras were meaningless sounds that have a beneficial effect on the nervous system. I didn’t know any translation for my mantra “Eima,” but I did know, from the puja, what “namah” meant in English. It means, “I bow down.” Who was I bowing down to, I wondered? Well, it must be a god. “Eima” must be a name for her, and she must be my escort on the path to higher consciousness. Another hidden teaching, obvious only to an advanced spiritual aspirant. I felt privileged and superior to be let in on the secret.


    Around this time in the movement, many people started to complain of physical problems, as well as irritability and/or depression..

    Once I was assigned to spend the night guarding one meditator who was being sent home from a siddhi course because she was “unstable.” She was being shipped out the following day, and course leaders were concerned that she mig