What's the equation?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 18, 2008 4:23 PM GMT
    You often hear "He lost (insert #) pounds of fat and gained (insert #) pounds of muscle."

    What equation do they use to figure this out?
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    May 18, 2008 4:49 PM GMT
    I dont know, Chaser. Maybe they go by percentage of body fat before and after and convert it into pounds.

    Nice you see your face clearly in your pic. Can we get a smile out of you now? ... icon_biggrin.gif
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    May 18, 2008 5:52 PM GMT
    Chasersprize saidYou often hear "He lost (insert #) pounds of fat and gained (insert #) pounds of muscle."

    What equation do they use to figure this out?


    Nice to see you back, Chasers. It looks like you've lost some weight.

    And your pal Chucky has left.
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    May 18, 2008 5:59 PM GMT
    Hey Chaser, welcome back. It looks like you lost some weight. Well done. Keep it up.

    Mike
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    May 18, 2008 6:18 PM GMT
    Chasersprize saidYou often hear "He lost (insert #) pounds of fat and gained (insert #) pounds of muscle."

    What equation do they use to figure this out?


    There are several methods to measure a person's body fat percentage. Calipers, water weighing, and so on. So that makes it easy to find out how many pounds you have of fat (just multiply your bf% by your weight), and how many pounds of lean body mass (by subtracting your fat weight from your total weight). If your fat weight goes down, that means you've lost fat (obviously). And since the only part of "lean body mass" that changes is muscle, if THAT number goes up, it means you gained muscle.
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    May 18, 2008 6:34 PM GMT
    Precisely it comes from a body fat percentage measurement. I will give an example here for your understanding.

    250 lb guy has a body fat measurement of 30%. 30% of 250 is 75 lbs. So guy has 75 pounds of fat and 175 pounds of lean body mass (LBM). Guy works his a*s off and does everything right guy drops down to 200 lbs and has a body fat measurement of 10%. So guy now has 20 lbs of body fat, and 180 lbs of LBM. Guy has lost 55 lbs of body fat and gained 5lbs of LBM.

    Keep in mind though that lean body mass includes everything that is not fat, including bone, and water weight. Water weight can change significantly making 1 or 2 lb differences inconsequential. This is best overcome by taking the body fat measurement at the same time of day, on the same day of the week, the same number of hours since last workout and as much as possible under similar hydration conditions. This will reduce any impact that hydration status will impact the measurement.
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    May 19, 2008 4:12 PM GMT
    jprichva said[quote][cite]Chasersprize said[/cite]You often hear "He lost (insert #) pounds of fat and gained (insert #) pounds of muscle."

    What equation do they use to figure this out?


    Nice to see you back, Chasers. It looks like you've lost some weight.

    And your pal Chucky has left.[/quote]

    Left? Who's he terrorizing now?