Work out routine for skinny/lanky guys

  • qd2009

    Posts: 164

    Oct 03, 2011 9:57 PM GMT
    I just finished working with my trainer for two months. He was great, and I learned how to do many of the lifts with good form using free weights, including squats, dead lifts, and bench press. But he was definitely not experienced and I'm sure he didn't know how to program a good workout routine for extremely lanky guys like me.

    Armed with the knowledge of how to do the lifts with good form, I want to program the best routine I can to maximize my gains (strength and hypertrophy). I've done research on bodybuilding.com, and found that there are a lot of articles which seem to contradict each other (the only thing they DO agree on is diet).

    Here are some articles I found that I thought would be helpful:
    http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/vinced3.htm. This one recommends a three-day split, starting with 4 sets of 4 reps (isn't that too low?) on most weights. Pretty much devoid of isolation exercises.

    http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/skinny_guy_beach_body_guide.htm. In this one, they recommend doing a full body workout 3 days/week. This also includes isolation exercises in the routine.

    http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/dickinson10.htm. This suggests not working out a body part more than once/week. Also recommends taking a week off if I don't feel motivated (this sounds wrong!)


    Which one do I pick?!? I don't have any specific short term goals. I'm just hoping that after three years I'll start to see something.

    Long story short: What kind of weight lifting routine is most appropriate for lanky guys like me?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 03, 2011 10:34 PM GMT
    A 3 day full body workout was exactly what I did when I started with my first trainer. 4 reps is way too low though.
    The beach body one sounds about right.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 04, 2011 1:45 AM GMT
    qd2009 saidWhich one do I pick?!?
    All of them. Take bits and pieces from each program, and tailor your own. Change it up a lot, too. That'll help prevent plateauing.
  • qd2009

    Posts: 164

    Oct 04, 2011 1:54 AM GMT
    Thanks guys!
    Also, should I go for low weight high reps, or high weight low reps? or somewhere in between?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 04, 2011 2:01 AM GMT
    qd2009 saidThanks guys!
    Also, should I go for low weight high reps, or high weight low reps? or somewhere in between?


    I would warm up with a low weight, high rep set, and by the 3rd set go to a high weight/low rep (not less than 8 reps) set.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 04, 2011 3:39 AM GMT
    I pretty much agree here. I think it is important to always start with a high rep set, to warm up the muscle group and get some blood into it. This helps prevent injury. I also think high reps are good for really working the small fibers that connect to your tendons, and increasing joint strength. This is really important...my experience is that muscles will get stronger much faster than tendons, and it is important to work back frequently with high reps to keep the smaller fibers and tendons strong, for safety reasons obviously. Maybe someone can give more info on that...

    So far as mass and strength, it is totally true that high weight is where you need to go if you want to work on that. I think high weight and high rep varies individually though. For me high weight and low reps is somewhere between 5 and 8 reps, although sometimes if I'm maxing out weight I will consider 4 reps effective. If I can't get 4 reps then I'm lifting too heavy. That just seems to work for me, but you may be a little different.

    My advice would be when you get to maxing out weight, ask for a spot. Again for safety reasons. But one thing I have learned that is really true is that so much of your gain is on that very last rep when you hit burn out. Have a spot on your max who can be there with you to follow you until that last rep that you can't barely finish. Have him help you with that last 2-3 lbs of lift when you freeze up, and with just a little bit of his help, follow through on that last rep to find your burn out. I always tell guys to follow me through for safety, but ONLY help with a little lift when I freeze on the last rep. A lot of guys will make the mistake and help you out too early, and then you don't find that burn out.

    Another thing that may depend on the person- I've always had much better success with free weights/dumbbells than with the bars. Working dumbbells correctly also gives you excellent core strength.