Hiring Locally for Farm Work Is No Cure-All

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    Oct 05, 2011 6:32 PM GMT
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/05/us/farmers-strain-to-hire-american-workers-in-place-of-migrant-labor.html?_r=1&hp

    How can there be a labor shortage when nearly one out of every 11 people in the nation are unemployed? [...]

    “It didn’t take me six hours to realize I’d made a heck of a mistake,” Mr. Harold said, standing in his onion field on a recent afternoon as a crew of workers from Mexico cut the tops off yellow onions and bagged them.

    Six hours was enough, between the 6 a.m. start time and noon lunch break, for the first wave of local workers to quit. Some simply never came back and gave no reason. Twenty-five of them said specifically, according to farm records, that the work was too hard. On the Harold farm, pickers walk the rows alongside a huge harvest vehicle called a mule train, plucking ears of corn and handing them up to workers on the mule who box them and lift the crates, each weighing 45 to 50 pounds.
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    Oct 05, 2011 6:43 PM GMT
    riddler78 saidhttp://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/05/us/farmers-strain-to-hire-american-workers-in-place-of-migrant-labor.html?_r=1&hp

    How can there be a labor shortage when nearly one out of every 11 people in the nation are unemployed? [...]

    “It didn’t take me six hours to realize I’d made a heck of a mistake,” Mr. Harold said, standing in his onion field on a recent afternoon as a crew of workers from Mexico cut the tops off yellow onions and bagged them.

    Six hours was enough, between the 6 a.m. start time and noon lunch break, for the first wave of local workers to quit. Some simply never came back and gave no reason. Twenty-five of them said specifically, according to farm records, that the work was too hard. On the Harold farm, pickers walk the rows alongside a huge harvest vehicle called a mule train, plucking ears of corn and handing them up to workers on the mule who box them and lift the crates, each weighing 45 to 50 pounds.


    Everyone already knew this...
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    Oct 05, 2011 6:56 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    DoomsDayAlpaca said
    riddler78 saidhttp://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/05/us/farmers-strain-to-hire-american-workers-in-place-of-migrant-labor.html?_r=1&hp

    How can there be a labor shortage when nearly one out of every 11 people in the nation are unemployed? [...]

    “It didn’t take me six hours to realize I’d made a heck of a mistake,” Mr. Harold said, standing in his onion field on a recent afternoon as a crew of workers from Mexico cut the tops off yellow onions and bagged them.

    Six hours was enough, between the 6 a.m. start time and noon lunch break, for the first wave of local workers to quit. Some simply never came back and gave no reason. Twenty-five of them said specifically, according to farm records, that the work was too hard. On the Harold farm, pickers walk the rows alongside a huge harvest vehicle called a mule train, plucking ears of corn and handing them up to workers on the mule who box them and lift the crates, each weighing 45 to 50 pounds.


    Everyone already knew this...



    .... except for the reporter and editors at the New York Times who just published the story today. icon_rolleyes.gif


    Uhhh... similar stories were published over the summer. Besides it's just common knowledge many Americans can't do the back breaking manual labor required in these jobs. Aside from that, having to pay the works an actual wage would drive the price of food up in a pretty bad way.