Apple: Steve Jobs 1955-2011

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    Oct 05, 2011 11:46 PM GMT
    Sad. From Apple's Board of Directors:
    http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20111005006884/en/Statement-Apple%E2%80%99s-Board-Directors

    We are deeply saddened to announce that Steve Jobs passed away today.

    Steve’s brilliance, passion and energy were the source of countless innovations that enrich and improve all of our lives. The world is immeasurably better because of Steve.

    His greatest love was for his wife, Laurene, and his family. Our hearts go out to them and to all who were touched by his extraordinary gifts.

    http://www.apple.com/stevejobs/

    Apple has lost a visionary and creative genius, and the world has lost an amazing human being. Those of us who have been fortunate enough to know and work with Steve have lost a dear friend and an inspiring mentor. Steve leaves behind a company that only he could have built, and his spirit will forever be the foundation of Apple.

    Also email from Tim Cook - current CEO: http://techcrunch.com/2011/10/05/the-email-from-tim-cook-apple-ceo-to-apple-staff/

    Inspiring... Reactions here at a tech startup news aggregator:
    http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=3078107

    From his 2005 Stanford commencement speech:
    "Remembering that I'll be dead soon is the most important tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure - these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart."

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    Oct 06, 2011 2:05 PM GMT
    Walt Mossberg on Steve Jobs - a heartfelt column: "The Steve Jobs I Knew"

    http://allthingsd.com/20111005/the-steve-jobs-i-knew/
  • Bigolbear

    Posts: 528

    Oct 06, 2011 2:26 PM GMT
    How sad icon_sad.gif
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    Oct 06, 2011 6:46 PM GMT
    I think the most profound thoughts on Jobs' death have come from other entrepreneurs - and I think he really inspired a generation of them.

    Here's John Gruber who writes Daring Fireball:

    http://daringfireball.net/2011/10/universe_dented_grass_underfoot

    After the WWDC keynote four months ago, I saw Steve, up close.

    He looked old. Not old in a way that could be measured in years or even decades, but impossibly old. Not tired, but weary; not ill or unwell, but rather, somehow, ancient. But not his eyes. His eyes were young and bright, their weapons-grade intensity intact. His sweater was well-worn, his jeans frayed at the cuffs.

    But the thing that struck me were his shoes, those famous gray New Balance 993s. They too were well-worn. But also this: fresh bright green grass stains all over the heels.

    Those grass stains filled my mind with questions. How did he get them? When? They looked fresh, two, three days old, at the most. Apple keynote preparation is notoriously and unsurprisingly intense. But not so intense, those stains suggested, as to consume the entirety of Jobs’s days. There is no grass in Moscone West.

    Surely, my mind raced, surely he has more than one pair of those shoes. He could afford to buy the factory that made them. Why wear this grass-stained pair for the keynote, a rare and immeasurably high-profile public appearance? My guess: he didn’t notice, didn’t care. One of Jobs’s many gifts was that he knew what to give a shit about. He knew how to focus and prioritize his time and attention. Grass stains on his sneakers didn’t make the cut.

    ---

    Late last night, long hours after the news broke that he was gone, my thoughts returned to those grass stains on his shoes back in June. I realize only now why they caught my eye. Those grass stained sneakers were the product of limited time, well spent. And so the story I’ve told myself is this:

    I like to think that in the run-up to his final keynote, Steve made time for a long, peaceful walk. Somewhere beautiful, where there are no footpaths and the grass grows thick. Hand-in-hand with his wife and family, the sun warm on their backs, smiles on their faces, love in their hearts, at peace with their fate.