How quickly can you change your back bicycle tire?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2008 3:32 PM GMT
    It took me 10 minutes during my lunch hour today. This is a record for me.

    It would've taken less time but I didn't want to break a nail.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2008 6:50 PM GMT
    funny pictures ... Do you get flats that often?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2008 10:10 PM GMT
    I have no idea how to get my back tire off. As much as I love my bike, I'm totally not mechanically proficient. I need to learn how to actually fix things on it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2008 10:14 PM GMT
    I get punctures in my bike tires quite often in London, I think there's a lot of broken glass on the roads from cars being broken into and drunks dropping glass bottles in the road. I carry a puncture repair kit in my bag now. I'm so practical.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2008 10:20 PM GMT
    Provided you have everything you need immediately in front of you, this can be done in under 5 minutes, of course I have a quick release wheel which helps.
  • NorthFl

    Posts: 98

    May 21, 2008 10:32 PM GMT
    especially if you patched the tube instead of replacing it, very good time.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2008 10:33 PM GMT
    Why is it that the front tire never gets a puncture? One of life's mysteries.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2008 11:01 PM GMT
    ~10 minutes because i invariably leave a tool in the shop
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2008 11:07 PM GMT
    I have always dreaded having to do this but with a mt bike it's not as common. I've never had to do it yet but I'm sure my day is coming.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2008 11:19 PM GMT
    eb925guy saidI have always dreaded having to do this but with a mt bike it's not as common. I've never had to do it yet but I'm sure my day is coming.


    Yeah, but you always carry a spare tire, dont you?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2008 11:24 PM GMT
    caslon said[quote][cite]eb925guy said[/cite]I have always dreaded having to do this but with a mt bike it's not as common. I've never had to do it yet but I'm sure my day is coming.

    Yeah, but you always carry a spare tire, dont you?[/quote]
    Hey, I lost 25 pounds buster! The best I carry now is the inner tube and I'm working on that too!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2008 11:26 PM GMT
    eb925guy said[quote][cite]caslon said[/cite][quote][cite]eb925guy said[/cite]I have always dreaded having to do this but with a mt bike it's not as common. I've never had to do it yet but I'm sure my day is coming.
    Yeah, but you always carry a spare tire, dont you?


    Hey, I lost 25 pounds buster! The best I carry now is the inner tube and I'm working on that too!


    WHAT? I meant an inner tube or whatever is in a repair kit. Whatever are you talking about? ... icon_eek.gif
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14380

    May 21, 2008 11:27 PM GMT
    Despite the fact that I depend on my roadbike to get to work in good weather and taking several bikerides on the weekend, I still do not know how to change a tire. I am very cautious when I ride. Since city streets in Buffalo are not in the greatest pavement condition, I watch for potholes, broken glass, and sharp metal objects. I keep my tires inflated to 120 psi so that helps prevent flats from occuring frequently. icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2008 11:35 PM GMT
    caslon said[quote] WHAT? I meant an inner tube or whatever is in a repair kit. Whatever are you talking about? ... icon_eek.gif

    LOL, you love harassing me about my spare tire....focus kitty man! don't you have a kitty changing a bicycle tire there in your collection somewhere? LOL
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2008 11:42 PM GMT
    10 minutes is good. I normally cuss for 10 minutes before I start to change it. icon_evil.gif I had two flats in one week last year at the beginning of the season.
  • groundcombat

    Posts: 945

    May 22, 2008 2:48 AM GMT
    havent had to change it yet *knock on wood*. we talkin road, downhill, crusier?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 22, 2008 3:27 AM GMT
    brilliant ***holes around here have the awesome idea of throwing their beer bottles at sidewalks and leaving the streets covered with glass. going thru tubes isn't at all unexpected.
  • Squarejaw

    Posts: 1035

    May 22, 2008 3:42 AM GMT
    I knew a gorgeous man on the California AIDS Ride who was prone to flat tires. He'd just get off his bike, take off his shirt, and wait for a crowd of fellow cyclists to fight for the privilege of changing the flat for him.

    Don't think he EVER learned to do it himself.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 30, 2008 5:48 PM GMT
    If you mean "change a tire", about 10 minutes. If you mean "fix a flat", about 5. That's on my road bike. On my downhill/freeride bike, it is longer. I'd need to get out my tire irons for that, so add 5 minutes. I don't know anyone who rides around with a spare tire (unless they are doing long distance touring). Many, if not most, bikers do carry a patch kit and/or a spare inner tube on their rides. Of course, neither of those do you much good if you don't have a pump or some other way to re-inflate the tube after you replace or repair it. If you don't know how to do this basic repair, you could check on the Internet for instructions. Often local bike shops (LBS) will hold free bike maintenance clinics which go over the basics of bike repair.
    The reason the rear tire flats out more than the front tire is because the rear wheel is the drive wheel which provides the power and it also carries more weight, thus it is more likely to flat out. If you are a serious cyclist who rides thousands of miles, you will see that the tread on the rear tire wears out much more quickly than that on the front tire.
  • Roadcyclist

    Posts: 35

    Jun 07, 2008 1:55 AM GMT
    Well if we assume clinchers and not sew-ups, replacing the tube on back tire should take no longer than 10 minutes, probalby less. Front should be 5 minite max. Course if you are on a relaxing ride with some friends, can become a social stop.
  • atxclimber

    Posts: 480

    Jun 07, 2008 2:35 AM GMT
    It takes me a bit, maybe 15 minutes, mostly because I never get flats (ride with Armadillo tires for the city) so I'm out of practice. And last time I got a flat I changed it... and either pinched the new tube or it was a dud because that instantly leaked out too. That sucks.