Bill Clinton for running mate?

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    Oct 17, 2011 1:57 AM GMT
    http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1011/66096.html
    Interesting scenario, and not unconstitutional according to the letter of the law. And God knows his mouth isn't as big as Biden's.
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    Oct 17, 2011 2:19 AM GMT
    Hard to imagine because it would be hard being number 2 after having been number 1. Plus Clinton has some common sense and would be hard to see how that would play in an Obama administration:

    http://policydynamics.org/blog/?p=679
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    Oct 17, 2011 2:25 AM GMT
    Emphasis mine:

    22nd AmendmentSection 1. No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of the President more than once.


    OPThe only constitutional requirement for vice presidential candidates is that they be eligible for president, so the position has the same age and citizenship requirements. A vice president who occupies the Oval Office because of the death or incapacity of the president isn’t legally “elected;” rather, that person is elevated by operation of law. Thus, Clinton is constitutionally eligible to serve again in the Oval Office.

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    Oct 17, 2011 2:27 AM GMT
    I forgot to add, people don't elect a presidential candidate/VP candidate with the idea in the back of the minds that the presidential candidate will be eventually out of his post during his term. icon_lol.gif
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    Oct 17, 2011 5:02 AM GMT
    theantijock saidI'd always thought it was just no more than 2 consecutive terms.

    But according to

    http://americanhistory.about.com/od/uspresidents/f/How-Many-Years-Can-A-Person-Serve-As-President-Of-The-United-States.htm

    Question: How Many Years Can a Person Serve as President of the United States?

    Answer: A president is limited to serving for 10 years in office. He or she can only be elected to two full terms according to the 22nd amendment to the US Constitution. However, if an individual becomes president through the order of succession, then they are allowed to serve an additional two years.


    Think JFK and LBJ.

    LBJ served the remainder of JFKs term, and since it was less than two years LBJ could have served two full terms. Had the 22nd amendment not been ratified in 1951, Truman could have served the remaining three years and half years of FDRs last term, which he did, and run for reelection for as many terms as he could win. Because the 22nd was ratified while he was in office, Truman was eligible to run for reelection only once from 1948 to 1952
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    Oct 17, 2011 5:13 AM GMT
    theantijock saidI'd always thought it was just no more than 2 consecutive terms.

    But according to

    http://americanhistory.about.com/od/uspresidents/f/How-Many-Years-Can-A-Person-Serve-As-President-Of-The-United-States.htm

    Question: How Many Years Can a Person Serve as President of the United States?

    Answer: A president is limited to serving for 10 years in office. He or she can only be elected to two full terms according to the 22nd amendment to the US Constitution. However, if an individual becomes president through the order of succession, then they are allowed to serve an additional two years.


    Correct. You did a better job explaining it than I did.