televised news this evening, expect to hear sentences beginning with "some people say" or "many people think" as a means of positioning a question for an interview or providing support for an opinion being advanced. Look for such deceptive phrases on your choice of early evening televised news, CNN and PBS too.
How do we know the motives of "some" people? Who are they? Where do they come from? How many of them are there? Under what circumstances were their opinions obtained? How old are they? Did anyone pay them? Do they even exist?

When will experts respond to "some people say" with, "Who might they be?" Or, "In fact, recent data indicates quite the opposite." They could ask one of these questions: "How many people actually say that?" "Who are these people?" "Where did you find them?"
Slipping "some people say" and "many people think" into "news" is not much different from placing subliminal product messages in grocery store music. It's deceitful. It takes advantage of consumers.

Change the channel the next time you hear, "some people say," "many people think," or vacuous statements in this genre. E-mail the station. Tell them to name their sources. Expect better. Insist on it! Let's teach our children to be intolerant of such manipulation, so we'll all be protected from those "journalists" and their bosses who apparently think we're stupid.