Only 4% of consumers likely to be satisfied with today's electric vehicles

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    Oct 19, 2011 1:39 AM GMT
    http://green.autoblog.com/2011/10/17/only-4-of-consumers-likely-to-be-satisfied-with-todays-electri/

    Given the results of a survey released this month by Deloitte, it seems shocking that automakers are willing to risk it on the development of electric vehicles.

    Deloitte's study, titled "Unplugged: Electric vehicle realities versus consumer expectations," suggests that consumers across the globe are unwilling to compromise when it comes to electric vehicles. Turns out, the vast majority of those surveyed weren't willing to accept an electric vehicle's limited range, high sticker price or the inconvenience of waiting for it to recharge.

    Deloitte surveyed 13,000 consumers from 17 countries in Asia, Europe and North America. The most shocking bit of data, perhaps, is Deloitte's discovery that less than four percent of consumers would be satisfied with today's electric vehicles. Of course, companies selling electric vehicles would probably be very excited to have a four percent market share, but that's another issue.

    The problem is that even though most drivers commute less than 50 miles a day, the majority of survey respondents illogically want electric vehicles that can go hundreds of miles. For example, Deloitte says that, in the U.S., 63 percent of the respondents would be satisfied with a range of 300 miles. Even more out of touch with reality is that respondents believe a 300-mile electric should carry a price tag that's right in line with today's fossil fuel vehicles.

    But the demise of the electric vehicle might not even be related to its own inherent deficiencies. According to Deloitte, if the fuel efficiency of gasoline or diesel automobiles "consistently hits 75 mpg, interest in pure battery electric vehicles falls off the cliff."
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    Oct 19, 2011 1:56 AM GMT
    "even though most drivers commute less than 50 miles a day, the majority of survey respondents illogically want electric vehicles that can go hundreds of miles "

    READ THAT CAREFULLY. So even today's electric cars are meeting consumer's real needs...........just not their "illogical" wants.

    And do you think that the current technology IS IT? Nothing more to come???

    Be optimistic!
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    Oct 19, 2011 2:01 AM GMT
    PresentMind said"even though most drivers commute less than 50 miles a day, the majority of survey respondents illogically want electric vehicles that can go hundreds of miles "

    READ THAT CAREFULLY. So even today's electric cars are meeting consumer's real needs...........just not their "illogical" wants.

    And do you think that the current technology IS IT? Nothing more to come???

    Be optimistic!


    The issue I think is the question of how often you want to be plugging in your car and you want the option to be able to travel much longer distances every once in a while. I don't doubt the technology will get better but it's much more likely that we will see much improved technology with internal combustion cars with new types of engines and much more efficient performance.

    Further, I think it's silly and stupid for governments to try to subsidize technologies over others given that they hinder and harm growth of developments that can actually be commercially viable. The autoX prize is a far better approach.
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    Oct 19, 2011 2:19 AM GMT
    " it's much more likely that we will see much improved technology with internal combustion cars with new types of engines and much more efficient performance. "

    REALLY? Why does that appear "much more likely" to you?

    Why the lack of faith in electronics innovation?
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Oct 19, 2011 2:53 AM GMT
    Even if only 4% of the public would be interested in electric cars, that percentage still amounts to a large number of vehicles.

    Electric cars could make sense for people who drive many miles per year with most of it being short to moderate distances in urban areas. That's especially true for two-car families who could use the fossil fueled car for longer distances.

    Regardless of how efficient fossil fueled cars become, they will still use fossil fuels. On the other hand, if we move away from fossil fuels for generating electricity, electric cars would greatly reduce the total amount of fossil fuel used.

    Moving away from fossil fuels to generate electricity almost certainly will require nuclear power. Renewable energy sources are intermittent and, without huge energy storage capacity, cannot replace fossil fuels. At the present time, there is no suitable technology available to store the huge amounts of energy that would be required to make wind and solar power practical. Even if good energy storage technology were available, the cost of renewable power sources would dramatically increase the cost of electricity well beyond the ability of using it more efficiently to compensate for.

    I've spend countless hours studying energy issues and have concluded that the way forward is to use thorium instead of uranium for nuclear power since thorium eliminates most of the problems associated with uranium.

    Here are some links that are useful to learn more about using thorium for nuclear power:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eU3cUssuz-U&feature=player_embedded

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSzEjWz5T44&feature=player_embedded#at=16

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEpnpyd-jbw

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/comment/ambroseevans_pritchard/8393984/Safe-nuclear-does-exist-and-China-is-leading-the-way-with-thorium.html?sms_ss=facebook&at_xt=4d9133b4906a1905%2C0

    http://www.rightsidenews.com/2010090111506/life-and-science/energy-and-environment/thorium-cures-the-free-market.html

    http://www.theecologist.org/blogs_and_comments/commentators/other_comments/962512/response_dont_dismiss_the_potential_of_thorium_nuclear_power.html

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/52d7bde6-e401-11e0-bc4e-00144feabdc0.html#axzz1YsnndyMZ

    With improved battery technology and / or provision to exchange discharged batteries quickly, and with economical nuclear power available, electric cars should become much more practical and acceptable than they are now.