Generation Jones

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    May 24, 2008 1:58 PM GMT
    How many men on here were born between 1954 and 1965? I just heard about this adjustment to the Boomers/GenX divide.

    Charlie (from Wikipedia)

    Generation Jones is a term that describes people born between the years 1954 and 1964. U.S. social commentator Jonathan Pontell identified the existence of this generation and coined the term “Generation Jones” for it.[1][2][3][4] Generation Jones has been referred to as a heretofore lost generation between the Baby boomers and Generation X, since prior to the popularization of Pontell’s theory, its members were included with either the Boomers or Xers. The connotations of the name “Generation Jones” include:

    a large, anonymous generation
    the slang term “jonesin,” which refers here to the unrequited craving felt by this generation of unfulfilled expectations
    The term has been cited in the U.S.,[5] U.K.,[6] Western Europe,[7] Australia,[8] and New Zealand [9]. The birth years typically used in the U.S. are 1954-1965, but tend to vary slightly in other countries, usually starting no earlier than 1953, and ending no later than 1968.[10][11][12][13][14]

    In demographic terms, Generation Jones was part of the baby boom which ended in the early 1960s. However, the events stereotypically associated with generational discussion of Boomers, including protests over civil rights and the Vietnam war and the emergence of rock music took place while the members of Generation Jones were still children or early teenagers. Thus the early life experience of this group was more similar, in many respects, to that commonly imputed to Generation X.

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    May 24, 2008 2:54 PM GMT
    Who comes up with this crap? Why do we allow some esoteric Bozo define us? The problem lies with the media and the general public's acceptance of this BS.

    Have you ever watched the movie "Wag the Dog"? They have a character called "The Fad King" who makes up all our new fads. This babyboomer/GenX thing is one of them.

    These divisions by the year of our birth are just another form of mind control. Resist it!

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    May 25, 2008 8:06 PM GMT
    I know it's all culturally defined and a potential source of division, but I don't take it that seriously.
    On the other hand, these cohorts do have some significance for social analysis, in my opinion.

    I also admit never feeling like a baby boomer (which every cultural source said I was) because I was too young to be a hippie when it was fashionable, or burn a draft card during the Vietnam War. Hence, Generation Jones.
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    May 25, 2008 9:01 PM GMT
    Then there is a smaller subgroup yet, those of us who watched a certain western-themed show in the very early 70s.

    We call ourselves "Generation Smith and Jones".
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    May 25, 2008 9:11 PM GMT
    I got called a boomer the other day. My PT was commenting on how well I was doing and then qualified it with...FOR A BOOMER! ... icon_eek.gif
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    May 25, 2008 9:26 PM GMT
    caslon saidI got called a boomer the other day. My PT was commenting on how well I was doing and then qualified it with...FOR A BOOMER! ... icon_eek.gif
    Don't want to burst your bubble, but that was a nice way of saying " you're doing well for an old man" LOL
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    May 25, 2008 9:34 PM GMT
    eb925guy said[quote][cite]caslon said[/cite]I got called a boomer the other day. My PT was commenting on how well I was doing and then qualified it with...FOR A BOOMER! ... icon_eek.gif Don't want to burst your bubble, but that was a nice way of saying " you're doing well for an old man" LOL


    I wont burst your bubble cuz then there would be lipid oozing outta everybody's screen ... icon_eek.gif
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    May 25, 2008 9:36 PM GMT
    LOL... nope... not that much! LOL Well, I've always felt like including me with the boomers was a little much, since I'm so far from the first boomers and have little in common with them....I'm happy to just be one of the jones! LOL
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    May 25, 2008 10:14 PM GMT
    eb925guy saidLOL... nope... not that much! LOL Well, I've always felt like including me with the boomers was a little much, since I'm so far from the first boomers and have little in common with them....I'm happy to just be one of the jones! LOL


    Oh is Jones the name you use at the motel?
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    May 25, 2008 10:20 PM GMT
    I'm generation 'Gimme ya wallet'.
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    May 26, 2008 1:00 PM GMT
    I'm generation "z0mG u suXXorz!1111!"
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    May 26, 2008 1:12 PM GMT
    I am in this Generation (very late 1960) and I do associate more with GenX then Babyboomers. I am more pragmatic and less idealistic then the boomers. I find the boomer's kids have more in common with their parents then the GenX. Idealistic and don't know what it means to struggle to find a job or an apartment.

    I was only 7 years old in 1968 which was probably the most tumultous year of the rebellious 60's (Martin Luther King's assassination, RFK's assassination, the Democratic convention in Chicago, the Tet offensive), so I was watching events unfold on TV not protesting against them.

    When I graduated from University we were just coming out of a serious recession, and when I was in my early 30's we went through another one.

    Because I was born late in the baby boom, apartments were very hard to find (around 0.7% vacancy when I moved to Toronto in 1986), as were jobs. Houses were very expensive until the 1990's recession.

    When one is born has a tremendous impact on one's life experiences. If you were a European male born in the 1880's or 1890's then there was a good chance you would fight in WWI. If you were born in North America in the late 1930's you missed WWII but got to participate in the economic boom of the 1950's and early 60's. If you were born in the early to mid 60's you would struggle to find a job in the 1980s since the early boomers had taken most of them.



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    Feb 20, 2010 8:02 PM GMT
    If you were born in the late 1960s you're an early generation Xer, not a baby boomer.

    About 1925-1954: Silent Generation
    About 1954-1961 (1965): Baby Boomers
    About 1961 (1965) -1981: Generation X
    About 1981-1995: Generation Y
    About 1995-current: Generation Z

    Many Generation X children are children of the Silent Generation (as am I) or the early baby boomers and Generation X is often considered to be the overlooked or forgotten generation because there are so few of us (about 46 million over the Generation X birth span in the USA).

    I am sure that many Generation Xers feel that most of the attention culturally and politically has been paid to the baby boomers and now Generation Y (there are so many more people in both of those groups) and I believe that is due in part to Generation X's small size.

    Whether good or bad, Generation X gave the world, not the Internet, but just about all that has grown from it such as electronic banking and finance, Amazon, Youtube, digital media, advanced video games, and the like.

    Generation Xers are highly-educated and are able to transcend the divide between the pre- and post-digital worlds as a result of living in both of them and actually developing much of the current digital world.

    It is said that Generation X has been whacked around in a post-Vietnam world, seeing all of the following in cyclical fashion: the existence and fall of communism, peace, war (Desert Storm, Kosovo, etc), recession, prosperity, digital transformation, and in economic terms, now more recession...and of course the rise of religious and political terrorism that now stands at the gates of western democracies.

    Unfortunately, Generation X also lived through the AIDS epidemic, coming of age sexually after the freedom of the 1970s and in the sexually chaste 1980s and 1990s.

    For the most part, Generation X is a more politically tolerant and open crowd, evidenced in helping to elect America's first black president despite its small numbers and this openness continues as a trend in Generation Y.

    It will be interesting to see if Generation Z continues on a progressive path or regresses conservatively.

    It is my feeling that now that the snowball is rolling, regressives will continue to lose ground on "family values" stances as the face of the family becomes even more diverse.

    However, there are serious challenges facing the USA and it will be interesting to see how the small group of Generation Xers handles them as it gains political influence, eventually overcoming that of the baby boomers.