How did it feel like to watch a gay movie in cinema?

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    Oct 20, 2011 2:16 PM GMT
    I went to watch a gay movie yesterday in a cinema. This is the first vietnamese gay movie ever and it was highly praised at the Toronto international film festival. The local people here were also eager to go to the cinema to watch a movie rumored to be "exciting".

    The cinema was crowded and all the seats were filled up. I thought that the movie must have been a huge success. But damn no, the movie was supposed to be tragic, but the people kept laughing, especially when the main character was saying "Do you really love me?" in a very tragic situation, but the people laughed out loud out of nothing!

    It was extremely annoying, as if they were thinking all of the things about gay love was a big huge joke. I have never experienced such feeling since Brokeback mountain was not allowed to be shown in cinema a few years ago. I know normal people don't want to know what the gay love is like, but they are really that stupid to laugh in a tragic love story, how stupid they are!!!!
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    Oct 20, 2011 2:43 PM GMT
    I wonder if they were just uncomfortable. The movie was a success, which is the important part: there are going to be more movies with gay characters in Vietnam, and people are going to be less focused on novelty and shock factor, and maybe they will start looking at the stories and realize gay is not that different.

    I've been always appalled at the way Hollywood treated the topic. From decades of simply ignoring us, to decades of treating us like the villains, to a decade of having us die horrible deaths in tragedy after tragedy. It took forever to get the first positive gay character, and it's been only in the last few years that it's perfectly normal to find a character that happens to be gay in a movie or TV show.

    I still remember the one James Bond (Roger Moore) movie where two of the villains were gay lovers. They show up only shortly, and James Bond finds a nasty way of getting rid of them that involves some sexual innuendo. I was angry, even back then, even as a child, because I knew it was mean to portray me that way.

    But at least, I knew there were others...
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    Oct 20, 2011 4:58 PM GMT
    Aww I remember going to the Landmark in the gayborhood to watch Brokeback. I don't think I was out yet at the time.
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    Oct 20, 2011 5:08 PM GMT
    I remember going to see Brokeback Mountain with some of my friends (straight people)...and I was the only one who didn't like it. Odd.


    Ariodante saidAww I remember going to the Landmark in the gayborhood to watch Brokeback. I don't think I was out yet at the time.
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    Oct 21, 2011 12:42 PM GMT
    ConfederateGhost saidI remember going to see Brokeback Mountain with some of my friends (straight people)...and I was the only one who didn't like it. Odd.



    Hmmm, letting alone how good/bad the movie is, the annoying part for me is the straight audience watching a gay movie without understanding anything at all.
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    Oct 21, 2011 1:08 PM GMT
    I saw Brokeback Mountain in a theatre, too. Despite Fargo, North Dakota being fairly conservative, there's an active gay population there, and it seems they all turned out for that movie, I knew half the people there in a full, and heavily male house. Of course a factor was that it was a limited run of only a few days, lots of local church pressure to not even allow the movie to play at all.

    So it was a mostly friendly audience, and when the scene with the shirt in the closet came toward the end, there was more sobbing than at a funeral. Even my BF was in tears, first time I ever saw him cry in public, but I'm mostly unaffected by fictional scenes.

    So when we were outside in the parking lot and my BF was discussing the ending with another gay couple who came with us, how all 3 of them had cried like babies, I said: "I don't understand all the fuss -- it was just a shirt." He hit me in the head. icon_redface.gif
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    Oct 21, 2011 1:16 PM GMT
    Like anything that happens in Vietnam matters.

    Goodness.
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    Oct 21, 2011 1:29 PM GMT
    BAMF saidLike anything that happens in Vietnam matters.

    Goodness.

    Actually it matters to me, insofar as I'm curious to learn about other parts of the world. One of the great attractions to me of being online is the almost magical ability to communicate all around the globe. It's like I have a mythical crystal ball on my desk, except that its surface is flat rather than spherical.

    So yeah (and not sure if you were being sarcastic), what happens in Vietnam does matter, as much as what happens in New Jersey, USA. Well, maybe not so much in New Jersey, but in lots of other places, anyway. Let's not be Western-centric.
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    Oct 21, 2011 1:37 PM GMT
    tyklong saidI went to watch a gay movie yesterday in a cinema. This is the first vietnamese gay movie ever and it was highly praised at the Toronto international film festival. The local people here were also eager to go to the cinema to watch a movie rumored to be "exciting".

    The cinema was crowded and all the seats were filled up. I thought that the movie must have been a huge success. But damn no, the movie was supposed to be tragic, but the people kept laughing, especially when the main character was saying "Do you really love me?" in a very tragic situation, but the people laughed out loud out of nothing!

    It was extremely annoying, as if they were thinking all of the things about gay love was a big huge joke. I have never experienced such feeling since Brokeback mountain was not allowed to be shown in cinema a few years ago. I know normal people don't want to know what the gay love is like, but they are really that stupid to laugh in a tragic love story, how stupid they are!!!!


    Yes, people are like trained monkeys. One crude person laughs at something that NOT funny...and a bunch of lemmings laugh too. They don't want to look like they missed the 'joke.'

    But look around, and the faces you see not laughing are the true gems in life. They are your friends. They're not like the crude person that laughs...nor like the lemmings that follow. They are the gems. They have confidence and compassion and wisdom. Sometimes, things happen so you can notice who the good people are.
  • patmos9990

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    Oct 21, 2011 1:41 PM GMT
    Everybody has difference experiences with how they view movies though. I remember seeing Pulp Fiction for the first time and couldn't believe the laughter during that movie. Especially when the needle went into Travolta's heart to bring him back from his overdose. At least they showed up to support the film.
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    Oct 21, 2011 1:43 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    BAMF saidLike anything that happens in Vietnam matters.

    Goodness.

    Actually it matters to me, insofar as I'm curious to learn about other parts of the world. One of the great attractions to me of being online is the almost magical ability to communicate all around the globe. It's like I have a mythical crystal ball on my desk, except that its surface is flat rather than spherical.

    So yeah (and not sure if you were being sarcastic), what happens in Vietnam does matter, as much as what happens in New Jersey, USA. Well, maybe not so much in New Jersey, but in lots of other places, anyway. Let's not be Western-centric.


    Very good point.

    I'm just as concerned about gays living in Vietnam, Saudi Arabia or Kenya, as I am in the US.
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    Oct 21, 2011 1:58 PM GMT
    New Orleans is a very gay friendly city. When we went to see Brokeback Mountain there wasn't a dry eye in the house, and I'm sure if someone had giggled in the least, they would have been tossed out on their ear.
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    Oct 21, 2011 4:28 PM GMT
    BAMF saidLike anything that happens in Vietnam matters.

    Goodness.


    Um well. I meant to set the topic to "How did it feel like to watch a gay movie in cinema" and my vietnamese case is just an example, because obviously i'm not living somewhere else icon_neutral.gif
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    Oct 21, 2011 4:31 PM GMT
    White4DarkerFL said

    Yes, people are like trained monkeys. One crude person laughs at something that NOT funny...and a bunch of lemmings laugh too. They don't want to look like they missed the 'joke.'

    But look around, and the faces you see not laughing are the true gems in life. They are your friends. They're not like the crude person that laughs...nor like the lemmings that follow. They are the gems. They have confidence and compassion and wisdom. Sometimes, things happen so you can notice who the good people are.


    I told this to a friend and he said "People laugh to hide their fear, the fear of abnormality". It's just so true that if they don't follow the crowd, they will be considered abnormal and they don't enjoy that at all.
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    Oct 22, 2011 5:37 PM GMT
    tyklong said
    White4DarkerFL said

    Yes, people are like trained monkeys. One crude person laughs at something that NOT funny...and a bunch of lemmings laugh too. They don't want to look like they missed the 'joke.'

    But look around, and the faces you see not laughing are the true gems in life. They are your friends. They're not like the crude person that laughs...nor like the lemmings that follow. They are the gems. They have confidence and compassion and wisdom. Sometimes, things happen so you can notice who the good people are.


    I told this to a friend and he said "People laugh to hide their fear, the fear of abnormality". It's just so true that if they don't follow the crowd, they will be considered abnormal and they don't enjoy that at all.


    I agree. It's like the closeted gay guy who laughs along at the anti-gay joke.

    A guy did that a long time ago with an AIDS joke. I asked him if he'd still tell the joke if he found out his daughter had AIDS. He looked at me and said that I was right. He heard the joke, and thoughtlessly retold it. A light went off inside his head...he realized that it was stupid to joke about a terminal illness.