Who speaks Spanish (Mexican), what does this mean?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 22, 2011 7:56 PM GMT
    Se cuidan niños mucha responsabilidad, numero limitado según las edades precio conveniente, cualquier pregunta llamar al.

    I'm guessing it says, "Taking care of children is a lot of responsibility, I charge a convenient price according to the ages, any question call me at (phone number)
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    Oct 22, 2011 8:05 PM GMT
    That the person who wrote this is a baby sitter, that she or he is reposnible, that she'll take care of a limited number of children according to their age, and that her/his services are not expensive, and if you any question call and then I guess their number.
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    Oct 22, 2011 8:24 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI was a Spanish language major and I couldn't understand that all too well. icon_sad.gif


    Using a verb in the third person plural with no other pronouns makes it appear like "children taking good care of themselves a lot of responsibility."

    />


    That's very common in Latin America, it's not because of a lack of education. It's more common to use the third person when writing an ad and I never knew they were called canguros LOL. IIRC you learned Spanish from Spain, right? It's very different from Latin American Spanish.
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    Oct 22, 2011 8:25 PM GMT
    <====habla de México
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    Oct 22, 2011 8:34 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    Hypnotico said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI was a Spanish language major and I couldn't understand that all too well. icon_sad.gif


    Using a verb in the third person plural with no other pronouns makes it appear like "children taking good care of themselves a lot of responsibility."

    />


    That's very common in Latin America, it's not because of a lack of education. It's more common to use the third person when writing an ad and I never knew they were called canguros LOL. IIRC you learned Spanish from Spain, right? It's very different from Latin American Spanish.


    I hope I'm not coming off as offensive. Not trying to sound like a snob. My Spanish is a little bit more Spanish from Spain but I do try to learn universal Spanish so I can communicate with everyone. I don't read Latin American ads so I'm not all that experienced. But I probably would have said something like:

    Niñero muy responsable, (the rest I could understand....)

    But that's just me. icon_smile.gif


    You didn't come across as offensive at all icon_smile.gif But everyone knows Mexican Spanish is better /endthread jajaja solo bromeo icon_biggrin.gif
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    Oct 22, 2011 8:48 PM GMT
    Hypnotico said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI was a Spanish language major and I couldn't understand that all too well. icon_sad.gif


    Using a verb in the third person plural with no other pronouns makes it appear like "children taking good care of themselves a lot of responsibility."

    />


    That's very common in Latin America, it's not because of a lack of education. It's more common to use the third person when writing an ad and I never knew they were called canguros LOL. IIRC you learned Spanish from Spain, right? It's very different from Latin American Spanish.


    i think so too, i understood it... i didnt think it was confusing.... i think this just how pppl talk.. i think i think too much...
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    Oct 22, 2011 8:51 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    Hypnotico said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI was a Spanish language major and I couldn't understand that all too well. icon_sad.gif


    Using a verb in the third person plural with no other pronouns makes it appear like "children taking good care of themselves a lot of responsibility."

    />


    That's very common in Latin America, it's not because of a lack of education. It's more common to use the third person when writing an ad and I never knew they were called canguros LOL. IIRC you learned Spanish from Spain, right? It's very different from Latin American Spanish.


    I hope I'm not coming off as offensive. Not trying to sound like a snob. My Spanish is a little bit more Spanish from Spain but I do try to learn universal Spanish so I can communicate with everyone. I don't read Latin American ads so I'm not all that experienced. But I probably would have said something like:

    Niñero muy responsable, (the rest I could understand....)

    But that's just me. icon_smile.gif


    hmmm, problem is i wouldnt see that as an add for services offered... i always see "se hace tal cosa etc" to advertise that.. most likely i would see it and assume this person is looking for a ninero, not offering one
  • alvarom

    Posts: 33

    Oct 22, 2011 8:55 PM GMT
    does not make sense.
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    Oct 22, 2011 9:00 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidWell, I would have put the rest. It would look like this:

    Niñero muy responsable en busca de trabajo, número limitado según las edades, precio conveniente, cualquier pregunta llamar al...blah blah blah...

    If it were under a section for services being offered it would be understood.


    in context yes, but it still sounds rather foreign...
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    Oct 22, 2011 9:49 PM GMT
    responsible babysitter, limited # of children @ a time, reasonable prices, call me

    pretty much all u need 2 know (yo hablo spanglish)
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    Oct 22, 2011 9:55 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidAfter looking it up it appears to be an idiomatic expression. Grammatically it doesn't make sense but apparently it is accepted as an expression that people use to offer services. But when they elaborate on their services it falls inline with what I was describing:

    1.
    cuidado de niños con experiencia en Marbella
    Chica responsable busca trabajo en el cuidado de niños,con experiencia en guarderias


    2.
    SE CUIDAN NIÑOS
    Soy Canguro, Niñera para Cuidado de Bebés, Cuidado de Mascotas, Cuidado de Niños en Madrid


    So, I learned something today. icon_smile.gif



    Canguro means Kangaroo. Get a refund, Spanish from Spain SUXXX.
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    Oct 22, 2011 9:55 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidAfter looking it up it appears to be an idiomatic expression. Grammatically it doesn't make sense but apparently it is accepted as an expression that people use to offer services. But when they elaborate on their services it falls inline with what I was describing:

    1.
    cuidado de niños con experiencia en Marbella
    Chica responsable busca trabajo en el cuidado de niños,con experiencia en guarderias


    2.
    SE CUIDAN NIÑOS
    Soy Canguro, Niñera para Cuidado de Bebés, Cuidado de Mascotas, Cuidado de Niños en Madrid


    So, I learned something today. icon_smile.gif


    I am Brazilian and also speak Spanish, and from what i've seen across Brazil in portuguese and also in spanish it is VERY common, and actually most of the time the third person is used when you put on ads or even in resumes - it looks more professional if you put in the third person instead of first
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    Oct 22, 2011 10:46 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    Mostwant3d said

    Canguro means Kangaroo. Get a refund, Spanish from Spain SUXXX.


    No need for such a hostile response for such a trivial matter. I'm sure wherever you come from you have colloquialisms that are only used indigenously in your region.

    http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=canguro

    canguro sustantivo masculino

    ( Zool ) kangaroo


    (anorak) cagoule
    (para llevar a un niño) sling

    (Esp) canguro sustantivo masculino y femenino (persona) babysitter; hacer de ~ to babysit





    Uhum. Good luck with that. Too bad people in Latin America are so uneducated, you can't really communicate with the locals. You are both pretentious and inconsiderate. Btw there is no such thing as Universal Spanish.
  • trl_

    Posts: 994

    Oct 22, 2011 10:51 PM GMT
    spanish was one of my majors and this is really unclear/difficult

    interpretation:
    caring for children takes much responsibility, a limited number of spaces available according to age with convenient price, whatever questions there are call [name not included]
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    Oct 22, 2011 10:55 PM GMT
    Mostwant3d saidUhum. Good luck with that. Too bad people in Latin America are so uneducated, you can't really communicate with the locals. You are both pretentious and inconsiderate. Btw there is no such thing as Universal Spanish.


    Qué demonios son estas tonterías? icon_rolleyes.gif

    You realize the Spanish language originally comes from Spain, right? Although granted the language has evolved quite differently on both sides of the Atlantic over the centuries. No variety is more correct than the other.

    I don't know about this concept of Universal Spanish, but plenty of words and expressions are the same across Spanish-speaking countries. There's really no other way to say something like: "Tengo un libro". It's the same no matter where you go icon_razz.gif

    Spain has plenty of its own education problems anyway. It has one of the highest dropout rates in the EU. Figures.
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    Oct 22, 2011 10:56 PM GMT
    That's a pretty clear sentence it's just missing the "con" between niños and responsabilidad. That's the error there everything else is 100% correct and proper Spanish.
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    Oct 22, 2011 11:12 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI was a Spanish language major and I couldn't understand that all too well. icon_sad.gif

    I'm not sure why a person wouldn't refer to herself (or himself) as a canguro or niñero/a which are Spanish terms for babysitter.

    Using a verb in the third person plural with no other pronouns makes it appear like "children taking good care of themselves a lot of responsibility."

    I understand that there is a lack of education throughout Latin America. It's really unfortunate. Just makes it hard when I have spent a lot of time trying to learn Spanish and then I can't really communicate with the locals. Sigh. icon_sad.gif


    I agree with you it's difficult to understand. it might be a regional accents, I don't think it is standard mexican spanish
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    Oct 22, 2011 11:15 PM GMT
    You've all been very thorough in your responses. I like that in my men.

    Thanks for your help.
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    Oct 22, 2011 11:24 PM GMT
    pocketnico said
    Mostwant3d saidUhum. Good luck with that. Too bad people in Latin America are so uneducated, you can't really communicate with the locals. You are both pretentious and inconsiderate. Btw there is no such thing as Universal Spanish.


    Qué demonios son estas tonterías? icon_rolleyes.gif

    You realize the Spanish language originally comes from Spain, right? Although granted the language has evolved quite differently on both sides of the Atlantic over the centuries. No variety is more correct than the other.

    I don't know about this concept of Universal Spanish, but plenty of words and expressions are the same across Spanish-speaking countries. There's really no other way to say something like: "Tengo un libro". It's the same no matter where you go icon_razz.gif

    Spain has plenty of its own education problems anyway. It has one of the highest dropout rates in the EU. Figures.




    Y es por eso que no se puede decir que el español es mas correcto en España. Y mucho menos decir que por eso no entiende a los mexicanos de bajo nivel educativo. Eso es una reverenda estupidez y me encojona. Me entiendes? Perdona si te molesta. Universal Spanish is a concept so it doesn't really exist. Obvioulsy, Spanish varies through region as well as English.
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    Oct 22, 2011 11:27 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidAfter looking it up it appears to be an idiomatic expression. Grammatically it doesn't make sense but apparently it is accepted as an expression that people use to offer services. But when they elaborate on their services it falls inline with what I was describing:

    1.
    cuidado de niños con experiencia en Marbella
    Chica responsable busca trabajo en el cuidado de niños,con experiencia en guarderias


    2.
    SE CUIDAN NIÑOS
    Soy Canguro, Niñera para Cuidado de Bebés, Cuidado de Mascotas, Cuidado de Niños en Madrid


    So, I learned something today. icon_smile.gif



    Hmm, if I had to write an ad, I would use the second structure... but if I were to write in english, I would use the first construction.. dont know bout everybody, thats just me though
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    Oct 22, 2011 11:33 PM GMT
    basing it on the ad I don't think I would hire this person
  • westguy79

    Posts: 175

    Oct 23, 2011 12:55 AM GMT
    charlitos saidThat's a pretty clear sentence it's just missing the "con" between niños and responsabilidad. That's the error there everything else is 100% correct and proper Spanish.


    Well said Charlitos! The ad is using one of the many grammatically correct uses for "se"!
    icon_razz.gif
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    Oct 23, 2011 1:24 AM GMT
    Mostwant3d saidY es por eso que no se puede decir que el español es mas correcto en España. Y mucho menos decir que por eso no entiende a los mexicanos de bajo nivel educativo. Eso es una reverenda estupidez y me encojona. Me entiendes? Perdona si te molesta. Universal Spanish is a concept so it doesn't really exist. Obvioulsy, Spanish varies through region as well as English.


    Pues sí, ya lo entiendo icon_cool.gif

    Besides, some of the worst grammatical mistakes are committed in Spain, haha. Only in Spain (mainly Madrid and the Castillas) do people confuse le, la, and lo! This never happens in Latin America, Andalusia, or Canary Islands! Also, a number of Catalanisms and Galicianisms (particularly some strange uses of "haber") have made their way into everyday Castilian Spanish that they sound strange outside to anyone outside Spain.
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    Oct 23, 2011 1:43 AM GMT
    pocketnico said
    Mostwant3d saidY es por eso que no se puede decir que el español es mas correcto en España. Y mucho menos decir que por eso no entiende a los mexicanos de bajo nivel educativo. Eso es una reverenda estupidez y me encojona. Me entiendes? Perdona si te molesta. Universal Spanish is a concept so it doesn't really exist. Obvioulsy, Spanish varies through region as well as English.


    Pues sí, ya lo entiendo icon_cool.gif

    Besides, some of the worst grammatical mistakes are committed in Spain, haha. Only in Spain (mainly Madrid and the Castillas) do people confuse le, la, and lo! This never happens in Latin America, Andalusia, or Canary Islands! Also, a number of Catalanisms and Galicianisms (particularly some strange uses of "haber") have made their way into everyday Castilian Spanish that they sound strange outside to anyone outside Spain.


    Thats always like that in the land where a language is from... it changes much faster at its centre than outside of it... American english has many archaism that the English no longer use (such as phrases like "I wish I were" and the pronunciation of the letter "r") ... but which they did use in England 300 years ago...

    Same for French, Spanish and Dutch...


    Funny anecdote: a friend told me that during WWII, American soldiers were watching a Shakespearean play, and that the English were puzzled because the American audience would laugh more often . I heard what was happening, was that the American audience was understanding archaic English wordplay that Shakespeare was using.. to which the English were completely oblivious lol
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    Oct 23, 2011 1:49 AM GMT
    I was told by someone who understands it that the person typed it as if listing bullets for an ad, only she used commas.