Ask a GAY, CHINESE, PUERTO RICAN anything you want!

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    Oct 27, 2011 1:12 AM GMT
    Ever wonder what life was like not knowing which box to check on a pre-employment EEO form or on the Census?

    Wondering how that all works out in the "pants" department?

    Or, maybe how we like our rice?

    Ask away!
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    Oct 27, 2011 1:13 AM GMT
    you got a good recipe for dirty rice?

    Also, how do you get your hair like that?
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    Oct 27, 2011 1:18 AM GMT
    Is it true that gay Chinese Puerto Ricans are hot as fuck?
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    Oct 27, 2011 1:41 AM GMT

    Hmmm....gay Chinese Puerto Rican....does this mean you know how to make sweet and sour alcapurrias?
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    Oct 27, 2011 1:59 AM GMT
    lilTanker saidyou got a good recipe for dirty rice?

    Also, how do you get your hair like that?


    Dirty Rice?
    Get one Chinese man, and one hot Puerto Rican mama. Put them in bed and out pops a "dirty rice" GAMRican! icon_wink.gif

    Hair? This...
    285596621_tp.jpg
    ...and this.
    04902239771_220x220_a.jpg
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    Oct 27, 2011 2:00 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidIs it true that gay Chinese Puerto Ricans are hot as fuck?


    You'll just have to find out first hand when I'm in Fort Lauderdale this December. icon_twisted.gif
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    Oct 27, 2011 2:01 AM GMT
    meninlove said
    Hmmm....gay Chinese Puerto Rican....does this mean you know how to make sweet and sour alcapurrias?


    Wow! Stumped me on that one! That's one thing I never had growing up!

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    Oct 27, 2011 2:02 AM GMT
    Which part is Rican and which part is Chinese. icon_wink.gif

    What did you look like in your 20s, you have a pic to show us?
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    Oct 27, 2011 2:06 AM GMT
    Did you speak a combination of English, Spanish and Chinese growing up? Was it all mixed up?
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    Oct 27, 2011 2:18 AM GMT
    GAMRican saidEver wonder what life was like not knowing which box to check on a pre-employment EEO form or on the Census?

    Wondering how that all works out in the "pants" department?

    Or, maybe how we like our rice?

    Ask away!


    Hot! I'd kill to have a body like that in my 20's or 30's icon_cool.gif
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    Oct 27, 2011 2:22 AM GMT
    waimea saidWhich part is Rican and which part is Chinese. icon_wink.gif

    What did you look like in your 20s, you have a pic to show us?


    Chinese from the waist up. icon_wink.gif

    Here's me from when I was 22.
    b135042f.jpg
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    Oct 27, 2011 2:24 AM GMT
    You looked like Fez from That 70's Show lol.
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    Oct 27, 2011 2:58 AM GMT
    Do you prefer empanadas or dim sum?
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    Oct 27, 2011 5:14 AM GMT
    GAMRican said
    paulflexes saidIs it true that gay Chinese Puerto Ricans are hot as fuck?


    You'll just have to find out first hand when I'm in Fort Lauderdale this December. icon_twisted.gif
    We gonna have a partay?
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    Oct 27, 2011 5:21 AM GMT
    xrichx saidDo you prefer empanadas or dim sum?


    Dim sum. However, in Honolulu there is a type of dim sum which has the same filling as "pasteles".

    220px-Pasteles.jpg
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    Oct 27, 2011 5:45 AM GMT
    Have you ever lived in PR? If so, what's your favorite area of the island?
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    Oct 27, 2011 6:01 AM GMT
    TerraFirma saidDid you speak a combination of English, Spanish and Chinese growing up? Was it all mixed up?


    Unfortunate for me, my parents were Depression era babies and when they came to the United States (South Florida), they didn't teach either my brother nor me their native languages. They stated that they didn't want us to grow up with accents. We probably would not have grown up with accents, but they just wanted the best for my brother and me. They just wanted us to fit in.

    English was the "lingua franca" in the household. I learned some Spanish in high school and college, and some Mandarin a couple of years ago. I do not consider myself anywhere near fluent in either.

    My brother, on the other hand, worked at the Perry-Casteneda Library at the University of Texas. They have one of the largest collections of Latin-American literature in the world. He has a minor in Latin-American Literature and speaks better Spanish than our mother. However, he speaks Spanish with a Mexican accent and dialect.
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    Oct 27, 2011 6:02 AM GMT
    TropicalMark said
    GAMRican said
    paulflexes saidIs it true that gay Chinese Puerto Ricans are hot as fuck?


    You'll just have to find out first hand when I'm in Fort Lauderdale this December. icon_twisted.gif
    We gonna have a partay?


    I love a good party! However, I'm usually the designated driver. :-)
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    Oct 27, 2011 6:02 AM GMT
    FastlaneKid saidHave you ever lived in PR? If so, what's your favorite area of the island?


    I have not yet been to Puerto Rico. I have visited the PRC.
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    Oct 27, 2011 2:49 PM GMT
    GAMRican said
    xrichx saidDo you prefer empanadas or dim sum?


    Dim sum. However, in Honolulu there is a type of dim sum which has the same filling as "pasteles".

    220px-Pasteles.jpg


    Hmm.. Pasteles... With Arroz Con Gandules and Lechon asado... That's it! I'm taking a trip there for the holidays.
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    Oct 27, 2011 3:39 PM GMT
    FastlaneKid said
    GAMRican said
    xrichx saidDo you prefer empanadas or dim sum?


    Dim sum. However, in Honolulu there is a type of dim sum which has the same filling as "pasteles".

    220px-Pasteles.jpg


    Hmm.. Pasteles... With Arroz Con Gandules and Lechon asado... That's it! I'm taking a trip there for the holidays.


    Now you're talking. And, my Uncle Mike used to make "Coquito" which was deceptively smooth, creamy, and sweet. You could drink a mug of the stuff. But, only a few sips were advised (and wise).
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    Oct 27, 2011 3:53 PM GMT
    I had the same issue with my PR parents. I never learned spanish from them, I had to learn it in high school.

    Now my family calls me the white boy or the gringo because I speak english so well but I'm not great with spanish. icon_redface.gif

    GAMRican said
    TerraFirma saidDid you speak a combination of English, Spanish and Chinese growing up? Was it all mixed up?


    Unfortunate for me, my parents were Depression era babies and when they came to the United States (South Florida), they didn't teach either my brother nor me their native languages. They stated that they didn't want us to grow up with accents. We probably would not have grown up with accents, but they just wanted the best for my brother and me. They just wanted us to fit in.

    English was the "lingua franca" in the household. I learned some Spanish in high school and college, and some Mandarin a couple of years ago. I do not consider myself anywhere near fluent in either.

    My brother, on the other hand, worked at the Perry-Casteneda Library at the University of Texas. They have one of the largest collections of Latin-American literature in the world. He has a minor in Latin-American Literature and speaks better Spanish than our mother. However, he speaks Spanish with a Mexican accent and dialect.
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    Oct 27, 2011 3:54 PM GMT
    Alcapurrias are awesome.


    GAMRican said
    meninlove said
    Hmmm....gay Chinese Puerto Rican....does this mean you know how to make sweet and sour alcapurrias?


    Wow! Stumped me on that one! That's one thing I never had growing up!

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    Oct 27, 2011 3:58 PM GMT
    creyente saidI had the same issue with my PR parents. I never learned spanish from them, I had to learn it in high school.

    Now my family calls me the white boy or the gringo because I speak english so well but I'm not great with spanish. icon_redface.gif

    GAMRican said
    TerraFirma saidDid you speak a combination of English, Spanish and Chinese growing up? Was it all mixed up?


    Unfortunate for me, my parents were Depression era babies and when they came to the United States (South Florida), they didn't teach either my brother nor me their native languages. They stated that they didn't want us to grow up with accents. We probably would not have grown up with accents, but they just wanted the best for my brother and me. They just wanted us to fit in.

    English was the "lingua franca" in the household. I learned some Spanish in high school and college, and some Mandarin a couple of years ago. I do not consider myself anywhere near fluent in either.

    My brother, on the other hand, worked at the Perry-Casteneda Library at the University of Texas. They have one of the largest collections of Latin-American literature in the world. He has a minor in Latin-American Literature and speaks better Spanish than our mother. However, he speaks Spanish with a Mexican accent and dialect.


    I look back and now wish they had taught us the languages, however I understand the time period when I grew up and also the place. They made the best decision based on their situation and the culture in South Florida at the time.

    I do have two friends, the mother is from Macedonia and the father is from Cuba. The mother speaks to the little daughter in Macedonian, the father speaks to the daughter in Spanish. They know that the daughter already gets ever increasing doses of English as she grows up. They are wise, and I have encouraged them to share as much of each culture as possible.
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    Oct 27, 2011 4:33 PM GMT
    I agree with you.

    I know my parents meant well, and were in fact only responding to the societal pressures of the times. Which is why they named all of their 7 children with American names.

    We also do not have a last name that can be identified by most people as Hispanic, so we were pretty much incognito unless we were asked.

    I actually had someone argue with me because he did not believe I was Puerto Rican. He had some pretty harsh stereotypes which I did not fit. icon_rolleyes.gif


    GAMRican said
    creyente saidI had the same issue with my PR parents. I never learned spanish from them, I had to learn it in high school.

    Now my family calls me the white boy or the gringo because I speak english so well but I'm not great with spanish. icon_redface.gif

    GAMRican said
    TerraFirma saidDid you speak a combination of English, Spanish and Chinese growing up? Was it all mixed up?


    Unfortunate for me, my parents were Depression era babies and when they came to the United States (South Florida), they didn't teach either my brother nor me their native languages. They stated that they didn't want us to grow up with accents. We probably would not have grown up with accents, but they just wanted the best for my brother and me. They just wanted us to fit in.

    English was the "lingua franca" in the household. I learned some Spanish in high school and college, and some Mandarin a couple of years ago. I do not consider myself anywhere near fluent in either.

    My brother, on the other hand, worked at the Perry-Casteneda Library at the University of Texas. They have one of the largest collections of Latin-American literature in the world. He has a minor in Latin-American Literature and speaks better Spanish than our mother. However, he speaks Spanish with a Mexican accent and dialect.


    I look back and now wish they had taught us the languages, however I understand the time period when I grew up and also the place. They made the best decision based on their situation and the culture in South Florida at the time.

    I do have two friends, the mother is from Macedonia and the father is from Cuba. The mother speaks to the little daughter in Macedonian, the father speaks to the daughter in Spanish. They know that the daughter already gets ever increasing doses of English as she grows up. They are wise, and I have encouraged them to share as much of each culture as possible.