Why Christians are embracing their LGBT neighbors

  • metta

    Posts: 39107

    Oct 27, 2011 9:48 PM GMT
    Why Christians are embracing their LGBT neighbors


    John 4:18, “There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear.”

    http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2011/10/25/my-take-why-christians-are-embracing-their-lgbt-neighbors/
  • Cutlass

    Posts: 426

    Oct 28, 2011 1:42 AM GMT
    metta8 saidWhy Christians are embracing their LGBT neighbors


    John 4:18, “There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear.”

    http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2011/10/25/my-take-why-christians-are-embracing-their-lgbt-neighbors/


    This is very encouraging, but we know we still have a long ways to go. While I'm a bit doubtful and suspicious about the percentage of catholics in support of gays and lesbians (why don't the faithful criticize, condemn, and resist the church's persecution of gays?), as I have said before, younger people have met and interacted with gays and have a much better understanding of them, and they will be the voters of the future; whereas the older archconservative voters will be dying and the younger ones will cancel out the elderly. Time is on our side.
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    Oct 28, 2011 7:06 AM GMT
    oh metta8, what must it be like to be a middlebrow?

    . . . Christianity without the concept of sin is utterly inane . . or as Whittaker Chambers so aptly put it, Christ without the crucifixion is liberalism . . . why bother hopping up on that cross if sin -- real sin, not political incorrectness -- doesn't exist?

    . . . don't you worry about what the unwashed and untutored masses will do when they finally figure out that their god has been liberalized into inanition and non-existence?
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    Oct 28, 2011 2:52 PM GMT
    I recall the news article when they'd finally figured out how to wear polyester blends.

    The dark ages had created sin in their minds, forcing them to kick out of the house their young teens who wore stretchy pants and socks that did not fall in strict coherence to

    Deuteronomy 22:11
    "Thou shalt not wear a garment made of wool and linen woven together"

    It was not just a problem for them, but for society because then we became responsible for taking care of their poorly dressed kids. And talk about a public relations nightmare!

    But eventually they would reconcile Deuters with John's famous passage in 5:23 wherein he described the difference between a mean queen and a evil bitch

    The mean queen says " Is that what you'll be wearing?" on your way out for the evening. But the evil bitch says "You look fabulous!"

    Right after acceptance of what was once thought of as sin, church choral groups started wearing the embroidered choir robes we've become so familiar with today that hardly anyone even remembers that there was once a time, long long ago, when God commanded that those shoes should match that shirt.
  • SoDakGuy

    Posts: 1862

    Oct 28, 2011 4:12 PM GMT
    Because that what Jesus would really do.

    metta8 saidWhy Christians are embracing their LGBT neighbors


    John 4:18, “There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear.”

    http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2011/10/25/my-take-why-christians-are-embracing-their-lgbt-neighbors/
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    Oct 28, 2011 4:36 PM GMT
    Cutlass said
    This is very encouraging, but we know we still have a long ways to go. While I'm a bit doubtful and suspicious about the percentage of catholics in support of gays and lesbians (why don't the faithful criticize, condemn, and resist the church's persecution of gays?),


    Meh,I think the catholics just dont really care that much about it.. which is fine by me
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Oct 28, 2011 5:49 PM GMT
    metta8 saidWhy Christians are embracing their LGBT neighbors


    John 4:18, “There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear.”

    http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2011/10/25/my-take-why-christians-are-embracing-their-lgbt-neighbors/


    That's really a sweeping generalization. We Christians are not monolithic; even within denominations, there are a wide variety of opinions.

    In the Episcopal Church, of which I am a member, we generally (but not totally) agree that doctrine is established by scripture (i.e., the Bible), tradition, and reason, with reason being informed by experience. Doctrine is NOT determined by the Bible alone!!

    Although many events have influenced the Episcopal Church, there was one event that had a dramatic effect. The Episcopal Church is ruled by the General Convention which meets every three years. It includes deputies who have been elected by each individual parish; they are not pledged to uphold any particular viewpoint. At one General Convention, a book, A Book of Revelations, was distributed to everyone at the convention by Integrity, the organization for gay men and women in the Episcopal Church. The book contained numerous real stories written by gay men and woman detailing how being gay had affected their lives and, in many cases, how their religious beliefs had influenced them. Reading the book made it inescapably clear that one does not choose one's sexual orientation. Once the deputies understood that, they had to acknowledge that discrimination based on sexual orientation is wrong because it violates the law, "Thou shalt love they neighbor as thyself," and obviously it was wrong to discriminate based on an unchosen characteristic; previously discrimination had been based on the assumption that those of us who are gay are so by choice. So, that one book changed the course of the General Convention.

    As a result of the above, it should be obvious that the way to change Christian attitudes towards gay men and women is to make it inescapably clear that sexual orientation is not chosen and rarely, if ever, can be changed, and that attempts to change sexual orientation are often destructive. That is not always easy to do since to rationalize discrimination, people have to believe that sexual orientation is chosen. Moreover, it is difficult for people to admit that they have been wrong for many years.

    In denominations in which members tend to be better educated than average and have higher income levels, it is easier to change attitudes; in that respect, the Episcopal Church qualifies.

    In any case, Christian attitudes towards gay men and women vary considerably although in general, there is much more support than there was a few decades ago.