Ask a Tooth Fairy... :)

  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Oct 28, 2011 3:54 AM GMT
    Disclaimer: This thread does not constitute my professional opinion. Any replies are just what is coming out of my ass at the moment. I may or may not remember everything from my 40 hours a week, 4 year dental school period and I may possibly remember to utilize that information in my answers. I have been out working as a dentist less than a year.
    Do not substitute the information in this thread as a substitute for seeing your regular oral health care provider.
    Do not assume the information in this thread constitutes the views of any professional dentists, the ADA, or any official dental organizations.
    Do not sue me if you decide to run off and superglue your crown back on your tooth, and it has to be extracted at a later date.
    __________


    Now, I would be happy to try and answer dental related questions in my humble opinion and from my point of view. Fellow Realjock dentites (and allied health professionals if applicable) feel free to chime in, or start new discussions!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 28, 2011 4:10 AM GMT
    Most of the dentist I have had the past few years had bad teeth themselves. I don't get it. How could someone be a dentist yet have bad teeth?
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    Oct 28, 2011 4:16 AM GMT
    I have a calcium deficiency in my teeth (since birth). I also have litle no no enamel on my teeth, they are "soft". Supposedly these things are common in twins, and have something to do with nutrition in the womb. I was given chew-able fluoride tablets as a kid (Which I am now told made my situation WORSE!). I have yellow and grey spots in my teeth(They grew in that way) and am very prone to cavities, despite my good dental hygiene.

    I am mostly concerned about the spots.... Do you know of anything, short of veneers, to reduce their appearance?

    (Woot, free dental advice!)

    I may ask something more specific to lifestyle of dentist/suicide rates later.
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Oct 28, 2011 4:18 AM GMT
    AlexanderB saidMost of the dentist I have had the past few years had bad teeth themselves. I don't get it. How could someone be a dentist yet have bad teeth?


    Well, not making excuses (since I've met a lot of dentist with bad teeth) but so long as the patients coming out of the dentist's office have great teeth, is it really an issue? Not every maid has an impeccable house, not every hairstylist has great hair and not every physician is in perfect health. So long as they can do great dental work, that is what matters.

    It is also very difficult to do dentistry on yourself. I know one guy whose Dad works in a mirror, but it's pretty near to impossible to do icon_smile.gif
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    Oct 28, 2011 4:22 AM GMT
    Does wisdom teeth extraction really slim the face? I read that models do it to get that chiseled look.

    http://askthedentist.com/can-wisdom-teeth-surgery-cause-a-narrowing-of-the-face/
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Oct 28, 2011 4:26 AM GMT
    ThePenIsMyTier saidI have a calcium deficiency in my teeth (since birth). I also have litle no no enamel on my teeth, they are "soft". Supposedly these things are common in twins, and have something to do with nutrition in the womb. I was given chew-able fluoride tablets as a kid (Which I am now told made my situation WORSE!). I have yellow and grey spots in my teeth, and am very prone to cavities, despite my good dental hygiene.

    I am mostly concerned about the spots.... Do you know of anything, short of veneers, to reduce their appearance?

    (Woot, free dental advice!)

    I may ask something more specific to lifestyle of dentist/suicide rates later.


    Hmmm... sounds like enamel hypoplasia or hypofluorosis (or a combination of both). I'd have to see photos of your teeth in order to get an idea, it's hard to tell what was the cause of them.

    Unfortunately, I believe the discoloration probably runs all the way through the enamel surface, possibly into the dentin (the second, softer mineralized layer underneath the enamel surface). Veneers are probably your best option for treatment, although there has been recent research that topical fluoride applications can alter the visual appearance of teeth if used religiously.

    Topical fluoride applications (Prevident 5000, MI paste) are usually what I prescribe to my patients who have a higher risk of cavities. It should help to create a hyperfluorotic enamel that is more resistant to decay and acid attack on the outer shell of the tooth. I would recommend seeing if you can decrease your cavity incidence before doing veneers, just because I'd hate to see you spend money and time and effort on veneers, only to have them decay right out from under you in a short period of time..
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Oct 28, 2011 4:31 AM GMT
    AMoonHawk saidOnce when I was having my teeth cleaned (and mind you I try to take really go care of my teeth, brush with the top of the line vibrating tooth bursh 3 times a day, floss, take calcium, drink milk and to dont' eat much sweets) they said I had two cavities .. I never had an pain where they said I had cavities and I could not see any spots. So they filled them in. Shorty after my dentist moved away. Was he just trying to pad his pocket before he left?


    Hard to say without the x-rays. Tooth pain usually only occurs when the decay has either gone so far as hitting the pulp chamber (that's the stereotypical "tooth ache" pain that is apparently the worst pain in your life) or if the tooth is open to the mouth from a large cavity (Well, it's not quite that simple. But I'd assume these are the two scenarios on a virgin tooth).

    Where were the cavities done? The biting (occlusal) surface of the tooth? Or the area between the teeth (interproximal)?

    Predicting tooth decay is kind of tricky. Sometimes despite doing everything right, teeth are slightly more prone to decay as opposed to someone who is less conscientious in oral hygiene, so don't beat yourself up too much. Dentists sometimes are greedy mister moneybags, but he may have been legit. Again, I can't say much without seeing your records ;P
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    Oct 28, 2011 4:33 AM GMT
    Why couldn't my tooth fairy be as hot as you?
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Oct 28, 2011 4:36 AM GMT
    Stan904 saidDoes wisdom teeth extraction really slim the face? I read that models do it to get that chiseled look.

    http://askthedentist.com/can-wisdom-teeth-surgery-cause-a-narrowing-of-the-face/


    Have never heard of this practice. I do know that corrective orthodontics and surgery CAN change one's physical appearance.

    This is an example of a patient before and after orthodontics (This is what I had done with my orthodontic treatment):

    case3_02.jpg

    This is an example of a patient before and after reconstructive jaw surgery

    case4_02.jpg

    http://www.reynoldsoralfacial.com/reconstructive-surgery/orthognathic-surgery.html

    Removal of wisdom teeth would have a minor effect on appearance, if at all. And one definitely shouldn't undergo extraction of third molars for skeletal esthetics...
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Oct 28, 2011 4:38 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidWhy couldn't my tooth fairy be as hot as you?


    Find a younger dentist. I'm not sure if there is some sort of national hotness committee for all dental school admissions, but a lot of my classmates and colleagues (as well as myself) are very pretty.
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Oct 28, 2011 4:59 AM GMT
    Shawnathan saidDo you really just drill holes so you can fill them?


    Drilling is necessary only when the tooth structure has been infected with bacteria that are eating the tooth. Most of the tissues in the human body will regenerate. Teeth do not regenerate like bone and soft tissue do, so they need to be repaired using inorganic materials. Once a tooth is infected with bacteria past the enamel, it usually does not heal itself to its original state, and usually progresses. If left unchecked, it can hit the pulp chamber of the tooth (in which case a root canal or extraction needs to be done).

    Infected tooth structure needs to be removed with a bur in a handpiece, and then filled or sealed over to A) prevent infection from occurring again and B) to prevent sensitivity to the tooth that was worked on.

    But generally speaking, yes. I also get paid to tell people not to eat Starbursts and to floss. They ignore my advice, eat Starbursts, and come back in pain, and then pay me to fix their teeth. Maybe I am the 1%....
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    Oct 28, 2011 5:01 AM GMT
    dancedancekj said
    paulflexes saidWhy couldn't my tooth fairy be as hot as you?


    Find a younger dentist. I'm not sure if there is some sort of national hotness committee for all dental school admissions, but a lot of my classmates and colleagues (as well as myself) are very pretty.
    Well, I did "hookup" with a dentist off adam4adam once. icon_lol.gif (real dentist - we played at his office)
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Oct 28, 2011 5:09 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    dancedancekj said
    paulflexes saidWhy couldn't my tooth fairy be as hot as you?


    Find a younger dentist. I'm not sure if there is some sort of national hotness committee for all dental school admissions, but a lot of my classmates and colleagues (as well as myself) are very pretty.
    Well, I did "hookup" with a dentist off adam4adam once. icon_lol.gif (real dentist - we played at his office)


    Quit spreading lies about us Mr. flexes, you had your chance. Are you coming in for your comprehensive oral exam next week? icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 28, 2011 5:37 AM GMT
    What do I get for only having one little cavity in 37 years?

    (Please say candy. Please say candy. Please say candy.)
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    Oct 28, 2011 5:59 AM GMT
    Why the dentist I visited last year tried to sell me something? She was really nice so I trusted her. But she sold me some over-priced solutions that I don't really need, such as this
    http://www.dentist.net/rotadent.asp

    I really don't like it.

    BTW should I visit a dentist this year?
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Oct 28, 2011 6:04 AM GMT
    DudeInNOVA saidWhat do I get for only having one little cavity in 37 years?

    (Please say candy. Please say candy. Please say candy.)


    Haha. You can have candy. Just make sure you brush and floss before you go to bed tonight, and don't be chowing down on candy all day long. In other words, you can eat all the candy you want at one sitting - if you only do it one time a day and you brush and floss afterwards. It's the frequency rather than the amount of sugar that is the culprit in forming cavities.

    Also, carbohydrates transform into sugars in the mouth as well. Crackers, chips, cookies - they all are carious (cavity causing).
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Oct 28, 2011 6:10 AM GMT
    iLikeDC saidWhy the dentist I visited last year tried to sell me something? She was really nice so I trusted her. But she sold me some over-priced solutions that I don't really need, such as this
    http://www.dentist.net/rotadent.asp

    I really don't like it.

    BTW should I visit a dentist this year?


    Do you have periodontitis with deep pocketing? That's why I think she would have suggested it. You can brush your pockets using the modified sulcular/bass method, but periodontitis is a bit more serious business.



    The dentist might not have been trying to sell it for sales, she might have tried selling it because she thought it might help. Or, she could be getting a cut of the sales... I don't know of course. I prefer to utilize what my patients are familiar with, but will offer guidance when a patient is interested in purchasing products.

    As for seeing the dentist this year - some people can get away without visiting the dentist, but if you are a perio patient, I'd highly recommend going. Most people have buildup that even the most meticulous brushing can't remove (and dentists or hygienists must remove it with instruments).
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    Oct 28, 2011 12:56 PM GMT
    Can u be negotiated with on your price for services?
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    Oct 28, 2011 5:38 PM GMT
    My gay dentist said I have the teeth and gums of a twenty year old. Is he trying to pick me up?
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Oct 28, 2011 10:21 PM GMT
    Jmoney5678 saidCan u be negotiated with on your price for services?


    Most dentists actually follow a regional average of dental prices for the most part. Most of the time, the dentist has no part in negotiating prices, if it happens at all (unless you happen to be working in the practice, or are the direct family of the dentist). There are payment plans, IOUs, partial payments, and private funds for some practices, but by and large the prices are pretty standard for the dentists in the area. Haggling prices is not recommended, as its likely to get you kicked out.

    A little known fact is a good dental practice may only have 60% of their overhead costs included in the price of the procedure. Most dental practices are more like 70-80% overhead. After supplies, machines, software and tech, instruments, paying the rent of the property, paying the dentists, hygienists, assistants and assorted other staff and all the other bills, there is not as much take-home pay as you might think. The cheapest place I've ever seen a filling for was maybe $50 at a dental school, and most places are much more expensive.
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Oct 28, 2011 10:24 PM GMT
    eagermuscle saidMy gay dentist said I have the teeth and gums of a twenty year old. Is he trying to pick me up?


    Possibly. He probably means you have impeccable hygiene with very little gingival recession. The more gum you show in your smile, the more youthful you appear. As we age, the gumline naturally recedes towards the root of the teeth, so having full gums is a sign of vigor.

    The teeth of a twenty year old is probably referring to either A) a lack of restorations, B) the shade (our teeth naturally darken or yellow as we age) or C) the tooth structure is not ground down by the naturally wearing down of teeth that occurs over time.

    All in all, it is a good thing. Did you now that when a dentist works on you, your head is pretty much right above their crotch? If you feel something hard poking you in the head at the next visit, chances are he's coming onto you. Or at least is horny.
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    Oct 28, 2011 10:30 PM GMT
    How often do you floss and do you floss with string floss, floss picks, or interdental brushes?
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Oct 28, 2011 10:45 PM GMT
    Stan904 saidHow often do you floss and do you floss with string floss, floss picks, or interdental brushes?


    I floss twice a day, although somedays I only make it once a day. I use the Crest Glide floss, because I have tight contacts between my teeth, and most other floss (and I've tried like, 30 different kinds) will shred when I try flossing.

    crest-glide-deep-clean-floss-mint-40m.jp

    I will save my floss for a week, and I just toss it in a small amount of chlorhexidine mouthwash or hydrogen peroxide then reuse it later on. Throwing it away is so wasteful, but after about a week even the thick floss I use gets pretty shredded and breaks.

    Flossers/floss picks can work, but the best is still string floss since it gives you the greatest freedom of motion. Interdental brushes work OK if you have large gaps between your teeth and dental bone because of periodontitis, but otherwise they will be too big to clean efficiently between your teeth.

    A video on proper flossing - using a "C" shape against each tooth surface to properly remove the biofilm from the interproximal areas.
  • commoncoll

    Posts: 1222

    Oct 29, 2011 2:09 AM GMT
    How do you try to make brushing/flossing more child-friendly? Especially someone who still can't brush their own teeth and likes to eat the toothpaste.
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    Oct 29, 2011 2:20 AM GMT
    I usually brag to everyone that I did not have to have my wisdom teeth extracted, because I have a big mouth. Har har.

    I was mocking a classmate for their unfortunate, petite jaw and my and my instructor said something to the effect of "Yeah, but there's a higher incidence of mandibular cancer in those with them left in."

    this-light-yagami-oh-shit-face-demotivat

    True/False?