RJ's with Diabetes

  • NHLFAN

    Posts: 370

    Oct 30, 2011 5:40 PM GMT
    What other Real Jockers have diabetes? As a type 1 diabetic for 20 years on an insulin pump there has to be more than me on this forum. icon_biggrin.gif

    For those that have insulin pumps too, how have you introduce it to people you are interested in dating? I tend to hide the infusion set when doing exercise by keeping my shirt on or putting it on my hip.



  • MCIC

    Posts: 211

    Oct 30, 2011 5:54 PM GMT
    In was just diagnosed with type diabetes in April. There calling it type 1.5, which from what I've read online is style a debated name. Basically, it's type 1 without the antibody that attacks the pancreas. I'm just on a long lasting insulin once a day for now. Had to change my diet a little, but not much. The doctor told me I was the first patient she has told could probably gain a few pounds instead of needing to lose weight.
  • conservativej...

    Posts: 2465

    Oct 30, 2011 5:58 PM GMT
    Me. Type I for 51 years.
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    Oct 30, 2011 6:04 PM GMT
    I was diagnosed with Type 1 at age 18. Had it 4 years now. On an insulin pump.
  • NHLFAN

    Posts: 370

    Oct 30, 2011 7:19 PM GMT
    running11 saidI was diagnosed with Type 1 at age 18. Had it 4 years now. On an insulin pump.


    So how do you like the pump? I'm using a minimed paradigm 722 pump. It has made managing diabetes so much easier for me and has kept my blood sugar in very good control. Last A1C was 6.4.

    Any issues when you run for long distances with low sugar levels?
  • NHLFAN

    Posts: 370

    Oct 30, 2011 7:23 PM GMT
    worcfun saidIn was just diagnosed with type diabetes in April. There calling it type 1.5, which from what I've read online is style a debated name. Basically, it's type 1 without the antibody that attacks the pancreas. I'm just on a long lasting insulin once a day for now. Had to change my diet a little, but not much. The doctor told me I was the first patient she has told could probably gain a few pounds instead of needing to lose weight.


    I don't get all the new 1.5 or the new 3. As my doctor has always said if you have the antibody you are type 1 if you don't then you are type 2. icon_smile.gif

    It doesn't really matter what number they give if you have it you have it. Managing it well is the key to avoiding any complications.
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    Oct 30, 2011 8:42 PM GMT
    Type I since 2000. The pump was never an issue while dating because I'd disclose everything. I'm on shots right now and it's a little more awkward lol.
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    Oct 30, 2011 9:00 PM GMT
    Type 1 since 1985. In all those years I've grown accustom to life as a diabetic, with the exception of one part- the cost. Insulin, syringes or pump supplies, meters, test strips, etc are all very costly. Even having insurance you will still pay a significant amount since insulin and the supplies do not have generic equivalents and so a bigger percentage of the cost still must be paid. Add to that having to see a primary doctor, endocrinologist, ophthalmologist, and podiatrist regularly from a young age for the rest of your life. You can live a quality life with diabetes, so it is too bad that often the most painful part of it is the monetary costs involved.
  • NHLFAN

    Posts: 370

    Oct 30, 2011 9:17 PM GMT
    Iceblink saidType 1 since 1985. In all those years I've grown accustom to life as a diabetic, with the exception of one part- the cost. Insulin, syringes or pump supplies, meters, test strips, etc are all very costly. Even having insurance you will still pay a significant amount since insulin and the supplies do not have generic equivalents and so a bigger percentage of the cost still must be paid. Add to that having to see a primary doctor, endocrinologist, ophthalmologist, and podiatrist regularly from a young age for the rest of your life. You can live a quality life with diabetes, so it is too bad that often the most painful part of it is the monetary costs involved.


    Cost is something to be aware of. I see my endo every 3 months, eye doctor once a year and then another with my healthcare provider. Lucky for me the pump, infusion sets, test strips, etc are all covered through insurance with no out of pocket cost.

    There are other costs not covered by insurance such as glucose tablets.

  • NHLFAN

    Posts: 370

    Oct 30, 2011 9:22 PM GMT
    flex89 saidType I since 2000. The pump was never an issue while dating because I'd disclose everything. I'm on shots right now and it's a little more awkward lol.


    I'm not sure I could go back to shots at this point in time. I love the pump, but still a bit insecure about the infusion set and it's not that big really. I've never had a bad experience with people with the occasional odd look here and there when I walk around without a shirt on.

    Just back to dating after a LTR, so this is the first time I've had to deal with getting intimate with someone who most likely has no idea what a pump is.
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    Oct 30, 2011 9:28 PM GMT
    Type 1 for 21 years. Basically my whole life!
  • MCIC

    Posts: 211

    Oct 30, 2011 9:47 PM GMT
    Iceblink saidType 1 since 1985. In all those years I've grown accustom to life as a diabetic, with the exception of one part- the cost. Insulin, syringes or pump supplies, meters, test strips, etc are all very costly. Even having insurance you will still pay a significant amount since insulin and the supplies do not have generic equivalents and so a bigger percentage of the cost still must be paid. Add to that having to see a primary doctor, endocrinologist, ophthalmologist, and podiatrist regularly from a young age for the rest of your life. You can live a quality life with diabetes, so it is too bad that often the most painful part of it is the monetary costs involved.


    To help with the cost check around at different pharmacies. I know around here there is a regional supermarket chain, with in store pharmacies, that offers the needles, lancets and several oral meds for free. Depending on your copays this could be worth looking into.
  • BlackBeltGuy

    Posts: 2609

    Oct 30, 2011 10:11 PM GMT
    Type 2 (not due to fat)
    on metformin 500 er
    my A1C is 6.5.
    been this way for over a year. bummer.
  • jamie1767

    Posts: 6

    Aug 17, 2013 2:33 PM GMT
    Hey guys, bumping this old thread because I just joined and I need some advice on this topic. I'm Type 1, diagnosed 6 years ago but just went on both the pump and a continuous glucose monitor about 5 months ago. The pump has been great --- my blood glucose control is much better, my health is much better, I'm finally getting something out of my workouts again (since being diagnosed, my workouts have gone downhill since prior to the pump my blood glucose was not in good control and my body just wasn't healthy), so all that is great and I'm loving the pump. Except for one thing: actually wearing it. I find it really uncomfortable and annoying (the CGM more than the pump, actually) but even that I can deal with. But I don't know how to introduce the pump (and the CGM, which is bigger and more noticable when attached) to potential partners. I'm not talking about guys I might date --- I'm assuming that anyone I'm thinking of investing time in will be undertstanding about this, otherwise they wouldn't be anyone I would want in my life anyway. I'm talking more about hooking up. It's not like I hook up all the time --- but let's admit it, it happens. When I was just on injections it was, ironically, easier, because no one could tell I had diabetes. Now I have these medical devices attached to my body --- so even though I'm healthier with them, I also feel more stigmatized. I'm not ashamed of diabetes or my pump, and I honestly don't think the pump or the CGM are gross, but they ARE medical devices, they are attached to my body, they are unavoidable, and not everyone is going to be cool and casual about it. I don't think you should wait until clothes are coming off to say, "oh, yeah... um... by the way... I wear this thing...", but on the other hand, it's not something you bring up immediately upon meeting someone either. This is all new to me, even though I'm not ashamed, I am a bit embarrassed --- I haven't taken even taken my shirt off in public since I started wearing the pump & CGM because I don't feel like getting weird looks, and I obviously haven't hooked up with anyone. I'm going to Provincetown next week for Carnival and it would be a shame to be in that gayapalooza and not let nature take it's course because I feel self-conscious about this issue. So, sorry for being long-winded, but does anyone have advice on how to bring up this topic with someone who is probably going to fall in the hookup camp and not the long-term potential camp? Thanks for any words of wisdom!
  • jamie1767

    Posts: 6

    Aug 17, 2013 2:41 PM GMT
    I should also say I'm asking this here because there is NO information on there on the web about this particular topic. Everything on the web about living with a pump seems geared to a suburban soccer mom --- i.e., how to deal with your pump when you have to pick up the kids from school! You would think that I am the only gay guy in the whole world with diabetes. Sometimes they talk about negotiating sex with a pump, but it is always in the context of a long-term relationship. Nothing on the web addresses what it is like to be an active, single, young(ish) gay male living in an urban center, who might do the things that gay men in those situations tend to do. No one tells you where to hide your pump if you're only wearing a tank top and tight jeans! Or a speedo. LOL.

    So thanks for any help.
  • NHLFAN

    Posts: 370

    Aug 20, 2013 4:29 AM GMT
    jamie1767 said But I don't know how to introduce the pump (and the CGM, which is bigger and more noticable when attached) to potential partners. I'm not talking about guys I might date --- I'm assuming that anyone I'm thinking of investing time in will be undertstanding about this, otherwise they wouldn't be anyone I would want in my life anyway. I'm talking more about hooking up.


    Can't really speak to hookups, but I don't think they are any different than dating when it comes to the pump and infusion set. I don't wear the pump when I have sex, but of course have the infusion set in. I have yet to find one guy who has said anything about it. "We" make it out to be a big deal, but to most guys it's not an issue. Put yourself in the their shoes, if he told you he wore an insulin pump, what would you do? Be prepared to answer some questions about what it is, what does it look like and be ready to provide some pics so they are aware of it. When it comes time for the cloths to come off, then they aren't going to be surprised.

    The CGMS is a little different in my opinion. I don't wear one anymore, it's rather large compared to the infusion set, and requires more explanation. I'd work hookups around wearing the CGMS. When going on vacation, I'd plan to not wear it for a few days and know I'll have to monitor my BS more frequently to keep control. You should follow your doctor's direction regarding any changes to cgms.

  • NHLFAN

    Posts: 370

    Aug 20, 2013 4:50 AM GMT
    jamie1767 saidI should also say I'm asking this here because there is NO information on there on the web about this particular topic. Everything on the web about living with a pump seems geared to a suburban soccer mom --- i.e., how to deal with your pump when you have to pick up the kids from school! You would think that I am the only gay guy in the whole world with diabetes. Sometimes they talk about negotiating sex with a pump, but it is always in the context of a long-term relationship. Nothing on the web addresses what it is like to be an active, single, young(ish) gay male living in an urban center, who might do the things that gay men in those situations tend to do. No one tells you where to hide your pump if you're only wearing a tank top and tight jeans! Or a speedo. LOL.

    So thanks for any help.


    Tight jeans and speedos are not friendly clothing for an insulin pump or the wearer. LOL Tank tops however, I wear a lot and have no issue.

    One thing I don't do anymore is go shirtless. Kids are very inquisitive and ask questions, which is a good thing. Their parents on the other hand think you've got a contagious disease . LOL. I wear the pump with me to the gym, test my BS there and have never had an issue at all. I think everyone is used to seeing me there, with my little back pack , so no one even looks at what I'm doing.

    Let me know how those speedos work. icon_smile.gif
  • jamie1767

    Posts: 6

    Aug 22, 2013 8:21 AM GMT
    Hey, thanks NHLFAN! Yeah, that CGM is frickin' huge, comparatively. I've thought about taking a break from both the pump & the CGM while I'm on vacation, but I have such better control when I wear them, and I'm going to be away for 15 days. That's a long time to have crap control, at least it seems that way to me now that my control is so tight. If it was just for a long weekend, maybe. I agree that probably the pump is not going to be the big of a deal, you can take it off and the infusion set is hardly noticeable. I guess it's more the CGM, or the combination of the two --- when I wear both really low on my body, so that they will be hidden below the waistband of underwear, for instance --- they're kind of both right THERE, say if someone's face was going to be... Um... In my lap... They'd both be staring him right in the face. Lol. It's kind of a lot when it's all right there. Anyway, thanks a lot for your thoughts, I'm just curious what other guys do.
  • NHLFAN

    Posts: 370

    Aug 24, 2013 8:40 PM GMT
    LOL...You may want to move the infusion set to your hip while on vacation. It's out of the way and he won't be eyeballing it while doing the deed. icon_biggrin.gif

    I can't stress enough do not stop using the pump. If you have good control using it, best to keep it on. Plus, when you're off it, it can be a pain the ass to start it all back up again.

    If you're still apprehensive about the infusion set, then consider wearing the pump, when you are expecting company, disconnect the pump, remove the infusion set, and once all is said and done (hookup), put the infusion set back in. Not economical, but at least you can still maintain really good control, not have to explain anything to the date of the night, and all will be good on your end too. Cost is the consideration here.
  • jamie1767

    Posts: 6

    Aug 25, 2013 2:50 PM GMT
    Hey, thanks for the advice! I did consider taking a break from the pump & the CGM while on vacation, but so far I have decided to keep it on, because I really don't want to give up that control. I'm on vacation now --- been in PTown since Thursday, so far, so good --- made it through Carnival wearing both --- although I haven't had a chance yet to test a stranger's reaction to it. I did have one incident where I was walking down Commercial Street and all of the sudden my pump (which was strapped to my thigh so it would be hidden under shorts, I usually wear it strapped to my thigh or to my calf under my clothes, I almost never wear it around my waist) came un-strapped and slipped down my leg to the ground (still connected). It was actually kind of funny. I'll keep you updated, I'm here until after Labor Day so there's still opportunity for mayhem.

    On a related note, how do you keep good control now that you've given up wearing the CGM? I hate wearing the CGM --- it's big, it's uncomfortable, it chews my skin up, it's touchy (half the time it doesn't work or gives bad readings) --- but when it works, I feel like it's invaluable. I could probably maintain good control giving myself shots, as long as I had the information the CGM provides. I just couldn't test often enough and respond quickly enough to changes without it. I wish the CGM could send the info to my phone or to my pump so I wouldn't have to carry two devices, I wish it wasn't so big, I wish it wasn't so ugly and so painful... but I'm less ready to give that up than I would be to give up the pump. I've heard several other people say that they used to wear the CGM and have given it up, though, so it seems to be a fairly common thing.

    Thanks for everything! I can't tell you how great it is to actually talk to another gay man with diabetes.
  • NHLFAN

    Posts: 370

    Aug 25, 2013 6:35 PM GMT
    I keep the pump in a front pocket and cut a little hole at the top of the lining to insert the tubing and connect to the infusion set. Works perfectly and gives easy access.

    I wore the CGMS for a year until it died. When it worked it was great, but decided I could go without since basal rates were finally dialed in and didn't have to worry about it. I test frequently 10+ per day. Learning how to count carbs is crucial. I can't stress that enough and making sure the doctor has the rate carb to insulin ratio. Once I get it all set up correctly, the CGMS was basically just an add on or a good way to alert when I had low blood sugar. To me it wasn't worth wearing, adding yet another device, adding the tape to keep it secure, etc. It just became a pain in the ass with little benefit. lol
  • jamie1767

    Posts: 6

    Aug 26, 2013 4:06 PM GMT
    Yeah, I agree with all that, I still test pretty frequently as well, maybe not 10+ times per day but probably 6-8 times, even while wearing the CGM. The tape etc. is a huge pain in the ass, then again, carrying around a meter + test strips + lancets is also a huge pain in the ass.

    I think I'm pretty good about counting carbs, I was always into eating healthy and monitored my carb intake even before I became diabetic so it wasn't like I had to learn an entirely new concept, I just had to refine a skill. I use an app that helps me make sure I'm counting correctly when I'm out to dinner or eating foods that I don't really know what's in it or what the exact carb count is.

    I really like the fact that when the CGM is working, I can go out to dinner or out to a bar or a social event at night and NOT have to carry the whole meter testing dog-and-pony show. I always felt like I had to carry a whole knapsack full of supplies with me everywhere, now with the pump and CGM, sometimes, I can just dash around with just a tee shirt and jeans and not have to haul all this crap around with me.

    Others have suggested the hole-in-the-pocket idea. I'm not sure about that one, for one, I don't know if I want to cut holes in all my pants. And for another, I don't think I want the bulge of my pump in my front pocket. In general I think there's only one bulge in the front of one's pants people should notice. ;)

    I found these things online called "leg thing' or "thigh thing" --- yes, that's the actual name --- they're basically just lycra sleeves with a pocket. You slip them on over your calf or around your quad and put your pump in the pocket, the stretchy lycra holds them in place. I get the long tubing with my pump, insert the infusions et somewhere low on my abdomen, and the tube just goes down under my pants to where the pump is. Depending on how tight your pants are, it's almost invisible. You can just roll up the leg of your pants (if it's on your calf) and control the pump that way, but I use the One Touch Ping, which has a remote control, so I control all the pump functions with the remote control. It can be a little weird at first getting used to this thing strapped to your leg --- when i first did squats with it on I was freaking out because I figured I'd hurt the tubing or something, and I'm sometimes a little cautious doing cardio because I'm afraid it's going to slip down my leg. But (except for that one random time just walking down the street) it never has, even during high-intensity interval training. I love these things, highly recommend them.

    Also, since being on the pump, I ride so close to goal all the time that I frequently have lows --- probably at least once per day now, sometimes more often (still trying to get that dialed in with my doc) and I don't feel them anymore. The CGM often alerts me that I'm low and I didn't even feel it. When I go without the CGM (say, if I take a day off on the day I'm changing it out), I have no idea where I am anymore since I don't feel anything... I can be 43 and have no idea. I also find it really helpful while working out, my BG drops really dramatically when doing cardio (less so while lifting weights), I like to know where I am at all times so that I can plan better. I'm not into taking t
  • NHLFAN

    Posts: 370

    Aug 27, 2013 6:17 AM GMT
    I'm also hypo unaware (new term for asymtomatic), which is why I test frequently every day. Having the CGMS is good for this, but keep in mind the actual readings are from 15-20 min ago and not what you're blood sugar is now. Doctor still tells me that the low blood sugar symptoms will return, but it's been years since I've been in very good control and it hasn't. I don't think it ever will.

    I always bring my supplies, no matter what. I have a mini back pack with meter, test strip, lancets, glucose tabs, back up infusion set and reservoir and few other things. It goes with me everywhere, it's a back pack, so people don't even give me a second look. Most people carry one.

    I don't wear the pump when working out or running. The drop in blood sugar from exercise is enough to keep me from spiking high and running with it will cause me to go low. Nothing worse then low blood sugar at the gym or running outside and no where to get a quick fix. Hence, where I go so does my supplies. Even running I put most of it in a camalbak and it's there if I need it, and I have on a couple of occasions.

    Managing the disease is fairly easy for me now. I have a routine down, make sure to eat properly, exercise, test, test, test and test again.
  • jamie1767

    Posts: 6

    Aug 27, 2013 5:05 PM GMT
    I don't know what happened to the rest of my post, looks like it cut off mid-sentence.

    That's cool, how you handle it. I take a lot of stuff with me on a daily basis, too, like to work or if I'm out running errands, and that's fine. It's more occasions such as going out to the bar or going out dancing, where I don't want to have a backpack with me. In the winter I can put some of that stuff in the pockets of a a big bulky winter coat (I live in NY so we wear such things in winter here! LOL) but in the summer, I want to be light and free.

    I do feel like I am learning to live with this disease as a manageable condition, rather than as something that defines me; but part of that, for me at least, is trying to make my life as normal and similar to the way it was "before" as possible --- I existed for 40 years on this planet without this, and I know everything is different for me now, but I want to make my life as much like everyone else's as possible. I think that's the difference between people who were diagnosed early in life and grew up living with this, and people who were diagnosed later in life --- I'm like: this might be my new reality, but how can I make this fit into who I am and how I go about my life, rather than making diabetes the thing that dictates stuff like what I wear and what I carry around with me. I know much of that is out of my control, because some things are just non-negotiable and the hard reality is that there are things I'm going to have to wear, ways I'm going to have to wear them, and stuff I'm going to have to carry around with me. But as you can tell, I'm fighting against just accepting everything the way it is! LOL. Give me 20 years with this, maybe my attitude will be very different.
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    Aug 27, 2013 5:14 PM GMT
    I suffer from hypoglcemia which can lead to diabetes. Most of it is due to stress and low blood sugar.


    I have had a few spells before in the past where i blacked out once after taking a shower and another where i started shaking uncontrollably.


    Both of my parents in particular my mother are concerned about this and as for me i am trying to understand more about the condition