Who has lived in the far north?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 01, 2011 6:39 PM GMT
    I've had a romantic notion about the north for a few years now. I'm studying to be a sustainable urban and regional planner, and am thinking about what it would be like to spend a year or two in the far north -- Greenland, Svalbard or the Canadian Arctic.

    So who has lived the furthest north? How did you handle your homosexuality? I wouldn't expect to have a guy around, but could it be something you feel the need to conceal in that kind of environment? I think it could be difficult to challenge traditional male roles up there.
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    Nov 01, 2011 9:07 PM GMT
    kandsk saidI've had a romantic notion about the north for a few years now. I'm studying to be a sustainable urban and regional planner, and am thinking about what it would be like to spend a year or two in the far north -- Greenland, Svalbard or the Canadian Arctic.

    So who has lived the furthest north? How did you handle your homosexuality? I wouldn't expect to have a guy around, but could it be something you feel the need to conceal in that kind of environment? I think it could be difficult to challenge traditional male roles up there.



    I think that will largely depend on where you choose to live in the north. The arctic nations you referred to are all pretty liberal, and at the least have small communities. (Greenland just held its first Gay Pride march in 2010)

    From personal experience growing up in Alaska and having friends from rural areas, I would say that your biggest problem will be the size (or maybe lack thereof) an LGBT community there. I wouldn't worry so much about concealing it or staying in the closet. People are friendly for the most part, and often people welcome the chance to get to know strangers in small communities. Are you planning on living in a larger settlement or were you envisioning a village?
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    Nov 01, 2011 9:29 PM GMT
    I'm not seeking the isolation or hoping to cure any social problems, rather in it for the landscapes, climate and extremes. Svalbard is mostly a research community and Greenland seems very modern with a strong Danish connection. I would assume that any work as a planner would cover a large area and many small settlements but be based in the capitals. In Canada I would not consider being outside the capitals. Also the compensation would have to include getaways!
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    Nov 01, 2011 9:42 PM GMT
    Hey, we have a similar fantasy. Have always wanted to try living in the true north as well. Have met several people who l have lived in or were raised in smaller northern communities. But I don't know personally anyone who has lived inside the arctic circle. Very few people live there, compared to the rest of the planet. Anyhow, the degree of tolerance varies greatly from community to community. I know one guy who literally had to escape from a northern native village, as his life was threatened. They suspected him of being gay because he wore fashionable urban clothes, and that was enough for death threats. In other places, like Whitehorse, tolerance is the norm.
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    Nov 01, 2011 9:47 PM GMT
    Nivek saidHey, we have a similar fantasy. Have always wanted to try living in the true north as well. Have met several people who l have lived in or were raised in smaller northern communities. But I don't know personally anyone who has lived inside the arctic circle. Very few people live there, compared to the rest of the planet. Anyhow, the degree of tolerance varies greatly from community to community. I know one guy who literally had to escape from a northern native village, as his life was threatened. They suspected him of being gay because he wore fashionable urban clothes, and that was enough for death threats. In other places, like Whitehorse, tolerance is the norm.

    That's what I'm concerned about. I know that in Canada the urban-rural divide on tolerance is huge... Don't know about the other countries or what classifies as urban/tolerant in the Arctic. Whitehorse could be cool, but it's not as extreme as I was thinking. icon_smile.gif
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    Nov 01, 2011 9:50 PM GMT
    Go to Iceland and visit Bjork!

    I hear that if you show up at her house at dinner time, she will invite you in for a nosh and a concert.

    :-)
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    Nov 01, 2011 10:26 PM GMT
    BAMF saidGo to Iceland and visit Bjork!

    I hear that if you show up at her house at dinner time, she will invite you in for a nosh and a concert.

    :-)


    lol, subject to screaming rants and self-abuse.
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    Nov 01, 2011 11:25 PM GMT
    Tromsø.

    There's a university there (most northern university in the world) so you could probably bang some students. Do not underestimate how expensive it is. Salaries are good though and hours are short. They also have trouble getting people to live in those parts so there's opportunities for professionals.
    And while the mosquitoes may be crazy at least you don't get those flies you get in Greenland.
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    Nov 01, 2011 11:42 PM GMT
    Norway is a real option. I've heard they import all their planners because they don't have a program to train them domestically.

    On an unrelated note... Vad fan! Wikipedia in Ænglisc! I can read this shit. It's like Esperanto to the Germanic languages. Tromsīeg:

    [url]http://ang.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tromsīeg[/url]
  • Lanter

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    Nov 02, 2011 12:40 AM GMT
    I was actually scheduled to go up to Fort George on James Bay in Northern Canada this past weekend. I had to postpone it till next spring at the last minute, but I have been part way. I would suggest visiting the eastern region of Northern Canada to anyone wishing to experience true remoteness, without hiring a bush plane to fly them into the forest. The only reason travel in this region is relatively easy is because of the hydro-electric power stations, but it is still extremely unpopulated and undeveloped. The road to Radisson is completely paved and if you choose to, you can drive east another 400 miles on a gravel road and get almost to Labarador. Apparently when you arrive at the end of this road, you are the farthest from a town that you can get by road anywhere in North America. I'm not planning to go on that road, but the region is a great place to experience true remoteness. As far as the rest of Northern Canada, I believe travel is mainly restricted to rail, boat, and ice roads in winter. Of course in the Northwestern region there are roads up to Alaska, but I'm pretty sure Nunavik is completely unreachable by road year round. I find the northern and remote regions to be neat to visit, but I would never want to live there. I think if you are looking for more open-mindedness, I would try and stick to communities that are somewhat accessible from outside world.
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    Nov 02, 2011 12:48 AM GMT
    I was thinking about Greenland and North Norway myself... tell me how it geos icon_smile.gif
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Nov 02, 2011 12:51 AM GMT
    I'm the guy you're looking for. Grew up in -70 degrees in Canada. Gay, obviously.
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    Nov 02, 2011 2:03 AM GMT
    I would consider asking Inuman ( a RJ member) his opinion. He is from the Canadian Arctic and has previously offered his authentic perspective of the north.icon_exclaim.gif
  • Suetonius

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    Nov 02, 2011 2:21 AM GMT
    kandsk said
    On an unrelated note... Vad fan! Wikipedia in Ænglisc! I can read this shit. It's like Esperanto to the Germanic languages. Tromsīeg:


    I give - is this old english? It is not "old norse" or any modern scandinavian language. Learning this is/was a hobby?
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    Nov 02, 2011 2:36 AM GMT
    Salekhard, Russia sits right on the start of the Arctic Circle! I have a long-time friend from this city. Even though it's a small city, it's amazingly the richest city in Russia because it sits on a huge natural gas reserve. It's populated almost entirely of rich people who apparently don't mind the Arctic climate. Maybe you'll even be lucky to come across some Nenets, the indigenous people of Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug.
  • Jerebear

    Posts: 329

    Nov 02, 2011 4:04 AM GMT
    I grew up in Grande Prairie, Canada and I've worked in Fort McMurray (near the tar sands). Not the arctic, but both are isolated, cold, and north. Both places are booming, and Fort McMurray is embarking on something that may be a great opportunity for you to get in on. This article talks about it:

    http://www.calgaryherald.com/opinion/Blake+Fort+McMurray+planning+core+from+scratch/5575780/story.html

    I was open about my sexuality when I still lived in my hometown. I mostly encountered indifference, which is great. You wouldnt need to conceal it at all.

    Finding guys would not be a problem at all! Resource towns tend to attract men more than women, believe me, you wont be celibate. Finding friends also would not be a problem. That's one thing I really miss about living there. There was actually a sense of community to the 'gay community'.
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    Nov 02, 2011 3:29 PM GMT
    Fun time in Labrador (Goose Bay)!

    Or not.
  • ytOwen

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    Nov 06, 2011 1:16 PM GMT
    I grew up in the Yukon, next to Alaska, and currently live in Whitehorse. The furthest north I've been in Canada is Herschel Island in the Beaufort Sea. It's a beautiful landscape if you like remote places.

    Whitehorse is good. There isn't a gay scene here, though there is a gay community. Nearly everybody I know has a profile on ManHunt - it functions more as a social network than a hookup site. There are few couples living quiet domestic lives. And as you might expect, there are lots and lots of lesbians. I find how out you want to be is a matter of preference.

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    Nov 06, 2011 1:19 PM GMT
    My blood freezes solid in temps below 70 degrees F...even have the heater going right now, and it's 71 outside.
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    Nov 06, 2011 1:48 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidMy blood freezes solid in temps below 70 degrees F...even have the heater going right now, and it's 71 outside.


    Oh Paul, you're so funny! icon_lol.gif

    OP: Follow your dream! You can always move if it doesn't suit you, or if the neighbors run out out of the village. You'll know if it's "right" or not.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 06, 2011 7:29 PM GMT
    What is the Far North? In the US? I lived in North Dakota for 11 years.

    No gays there in any number, I used the new Internet to find them, few as they were. And spent a lot of time in Canada. No matter -- I love the North, always will.
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    Nov 06, 2011 7:37 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidWhat is the Far North? In the US? I lived in North Dakota for 11 years.

    No gays there in any number, I used the new Internet to find them, few as they were. And spent a lot of time in Canada. No matter -- I love the North, always will.


    Neh... far north would be like near to the arctic circle... south alaska's panhandle is not even north enough.. its more like greenland, iceland, norway, the northern territories, Siberia etc
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    Nov 06, 2011 7:47 PM GMT
    kandsk saidNorway is a real option. I've heard they import all their planners because they don't have a program to train them domestically.

    On an unrelated note... Vad fan! Wikipedia in Ænglisc! I can read this shit. It's like Esperanto to the Germanic languages. Tromsīeg:

    [url]http://ang.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tromsīeg[/url]


    That is clearly Old English... the language spoken in the 5th, 6th century in much of england, after the Romans left, and after the Angle and Saxon invasion from Denmark and Germany....

    It is not really comparable to Esperanto.... that is not a natural language... it is, however, like other ancient languages, to modern English as Latin relates to modern-day Romance.. and it is in fact, a contemporary of Vulgar Latin ...
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    Nov 06, 2011 7:49 PM GMT
    Trollileo said
    GreenHopper said
    Art_Deco saidWhat is the Far North? In the US? I lived in North Dakota for 11 years.

    No gays there in any number, I used the new Internet to find them, few as they were. And spent a lot of time in Canada. No matter -- I love the North, always will.


    Neh... far north would be like near to the arctic circle... south alaska's panhandle is not even north enough.. its more like greenland, iceland, norway, the northern territories, Siberia etc
    Yeah, North Dakota sure as hell does NOT count as the far north.

    Agreed, although the climate of ND is pretty similar to parts of Alaska and Yukon. I'm talkin' arctic or subarctic climate. No Boreal forest...
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    Nov 06, 2011 9:49 PM GMT
    I think the lack of sun would be a bigger issue. Unless you're emotionally balanced, it could mess you up.
    Some Arctic villages in Greenland (and Norway?) have some of the highest rates of depression and suicides.

    I don't want to rain on your parade, just to give you something else to consider.