Self massage and others techniques to help a shin split?

  • Dominican_Gen...

    Posts: 379

    Nov 03, 2011 7:51 AM GMT
    Hello guys,

    After been out of running due to a shin split (with LOTS of ice compressions in the meanwhile) I ran again for the first time and 5K into the run the leg felt so stiff I had to stop. At that moment I really craved for a massage, but for various reasons couldn't get one.

    Do you guys know of any self-massage one can learn for such situations? Ideally something o ne could add to the stretching session at the end of your run? Thanks in advance.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Nov 03, 2011 8:39 AM GMT
    Yes I learned this from a knowledgeable physical therapist and it worked well!! With your right leg and right hand-Run your thumb on the left side of your shin past the shin bone and your pointer and middle finger down the other side past the bone apply strong pressure and rub you shin up and down. Use lotion or you will lose leg hair. He called it stripping the shin. It hurts a bit- not alot. You can do this twice a day-no more. Relief may take a few days for some right away.

    Also same hand same fingers- sit in a chair bend your knee at a right angle foot flat on the floor in running shoes. Lay your right hand on you right knee pointer finger(index finger) over your knee cap. With your thumb on the left side of your right knee at the muscle ligament and your middle finger and third finger on the right side outer tendeon squeeze hard and hold for 20 seconds, then immediately lift your right hand of and place it face down over your knee find the soft tendon right below your knee cap and push in with decent pressure for 7-8 seconds with all three fingers and hold steady pressure, then release your grip, lift your leg about 6 inches off the ground and drive your heel to the floor with force like a stomp(make sure you have a good running sneaker on.) Now walk around and the shin splint pain will dissapear. Then repeat it on the other leg. Always right hand to right knee and left hand to left knee. You will feel a noticable difference right away. He called this resetting the knee. Don't do these more than once a day.

    If you are doing this it is easier if someone reads you this while you concentrate on doing it right.

    Hope this helps
    Mike-- let me know!!!

    It really worked for me and some of my friends who are distance runners. I am not a Dr. but it did work and I trusted the PT who gave me the advice.
  • Dominican_Gen...

    Posts: 379

    Nov 03, 2011 10:49 AM GMT
    Thanks. The reset movement sounds kind of intimidating, but I ll give it a try. You are right, this is complex enough for me to practice it at home before heading out to run. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 03, 2011 3:21 PM GMT
    How old are your shoes? They may need replacing.

    How is your form? Do you pick up your feet enough? Try running (jogging) on a treadmill for a while at a 2 to 5 incline. The climbing on the incline will help teach you better form. This takes time. Try starting with just 5 minutes and build up. You will also get benefits of a stronger core from this.

    I suffered from horrible shin splints when I started running. When I started to include speed training and hill training they went away.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Nov 04, 2011 2:08 AM GMT
    Many years ago, when I lived in San Diego, I had shin splints on both legs and couldn't seem to get rid of the problem. Then I figured that if I didn't have a heal lift there would be less strain on the front of my lower legs and the problem might go away. So, I started running barefooted on the beach which caused my heals to be lower than my toes. It worked when nothing else had; the problem went away and never returned.

    Running barefooted on the beach did require some adjustment. Before I could run long distances like that, the bottoms of my feet had to get toughened up, then my Achilles tendons had to adjust. That took less time than I would have expected, after which I could easily run about 6 miles barefooted on the beach.

    Not everyone lives conveniently close to a beach where running barefooted for long distances is possible. It might be possible to get the same effect by modifying shoes. It might not work for everyone either.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 04, 2011 2:25 AM GMT
    Self myofascial release.
    It's highly reccomended I do it almost daily.
    You roll around on a dense foam roller. Just google it, a ton of stuff will come up on it.
  • tddpt

    Posts: 12

    Nov 04, 2011 2:41 AM GMT
    I'm currently in physical therapy school and from what I have learned thus far is you probably should do a ice massage. It's pretty simple, just get a little dixie cup and fill it about half way with water, then freeze it. When frozen, rip the top edge off of the cup and then apply the ice to the problem area and gently massage the skin in a circular motion for 10-12 minutes. You will go through a sensation cycle of coldness then burning then aching and finally numbness. This should help decrease any inflammation at the site of injury and also help with the pain you are experiencing. If you start to get an increase in inflammation you can also try elevating your legs and/or applying a compression wrap.

    Just also know DO NOT use heat with this problem as it will only make it worse!

    Hope this helps icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 04, 2011 2:42 AM GMT
    Have you heard of the cold spoon thing?

    Put some spoons in the fridge or freezer and once they are cold run them over your shins.
  • tddpt

    Posts: 12

    Nov 04, 2011 2:42 AM GMT
    Also, try youtubing Effluerage massage techniques...this could help relax the tissue and aid in healing and repair as well as decrease the inflammation and pain!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 04, 2011 2:22 PM GMT
    Rest for a bit and then start some Calf raises to support and strengthen - worked to fix my shin splints...

    Massage the calves and sides of the shins as well - helps to "flush" blood through the area.

    If your Gym has a vibration platform try that for 10 minutes - that helped me with the shin pain too..
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Nov 04, 2011 7:54 PM GMT
    It may be that the same approach to dealing with shin splints doesn't work for everyone. I believe in experimenting.

    Sometimes problems go away on their own. As a result, ineffective approaches can get the credit when they had nothing to do with eliminating the problem. The human body is very complex and it may be another 20 years before medicine becomes an exact science.icon_biggrin.gif

    Following the various suggestions is a reasonable thing to do since some might work, including my method which seemed to work for me.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Nov 05, 2011 7:18 AM GMT
    Dominican_Gent saidThanks. The reset movement sounds kind of intimidating, but I ll give it a try. You are right, this is complex enough for me to practice it at home before heading out to run. icon_biggrin.gif


    No! It's easy. I just got wordy being specific. Let me know how it works. I no longer get shin splints or calf pain.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 05, 2011 7:29 AM GMT
    komodo+sport.jpg

    http://www.vibramfivefingers.com/index.htm

    Yes, this will cause a ton of controversy cause bitches love to h8 on new shit, but honestly THESE CURED my shin splints. I haven't had any bad shin pain in the 2 years since I switched to them.

    Before them, I spent 3 days a week in the physical therapists office with the ultrasound heat treatment followed by massage and then taping of the legs.

    Another thing to try might be compression socks. Those helped as well.