Lost in Whole Foods - need help!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 03, 2011 10:40 PM GMT
    Due to an early "Nor' easter" - which is a really big snow storm. We lost power for five days and with it all our food. Which gives me an opportunity to start over and eat REALLY Healthy. Our refrigerator is completely empty. Went to Whole Foods to stock up and realized that I was lost in the aisles, dazed and confused as to what to buy.

    I am 49, 5' 11", was 235 lbs, no upper body strength, with a 42 inch waist. Started working out about a year ago, I'm now 225 lbs with a 35 inch waist. My endurance is up, my upper body strength is up, my core is tighter, arms are bigger, recently completed Rugged Maniac and running Tough Mudder in December.

    I need help selecting a diet and food list that is EASY to follow. I have looked at the Paleo Diet, RJ diets.... and need help.

    Can RJ's recommend a simple, fool proof, healthy eating plan that will help me shed some more weight while providing the necessary nutrients to continue gaining strength, flexibility, endurance ... I am not looking to become a body builder... My goal is to become as fit as possible and compete in Tough Mudder/Adventure racing events.

    Thanks for all your help!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 03, 2011 10:56 PM GMT
    Dude, this is easy. Although you haven't mentioned if you're a vegetarian or vegan, I'll assume you're not.

    Quantity will have to be determined based upon your desired weight, but think of Grandma's plate she put before you:

    1. 1/3 of your plate has some type of meat, broiled or boiled. Lean heavily on the poultry, with incidental beef or pork thrown in once (at most twice) a week. Season, but don't smother (like, no gravy or cheese on it).
    2. Multicolored vegetables on the other 2/3rds of the plate. Lean heavily on darker green vegetables, but supplement with oranges and yellows that are not fruit (you know, pepper is a fruit).
    3. Dessert: fruit. Can be a salad comprised of mostly tomatoes and peppers with some lettuce, or toss in some apples, grapes and orange slices. Easy on the dressing, but use an oily dressing of vegetable/olive oil.
    4. Water. Milk. Juice (in order of frequency; water at every meal, one meal can have milk--lowfat--one meal can have juice).
    5. Snacks between meals, like whole wheat bagel (I like cinnamon raisin swirl), more fruit or nuts/trail mix.

    None of this requires Whole Foods. Whole Foods will cost you in some cases 50% more per serving. Their food is neither healthier for you, nor will it save the environment any faster.

    Don't want chemicals on your food? Wash it well before preparing it. It won't kill you or give you cancer...I promise.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 03, 2011 11:13 PM GMT
    WEll, I think different body types have different requirements.... I would just make sure you keep a balance.. not too much of anything... enough fruits and veggies especially.. (like at least 4/5 portions a day) in as much variety a possible and as much organic as possible to avoid bad industrial contaminations in your foodstuffs
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Nov 03, 2011 11:44 PM GMT
    Eat anything you want, as long as it doesn`t involve wheat. No pasta, no bread, whole wheat or otherwise. You can eat all the carbs you want, no damage there. Just don`t eat wheat. Today`s wheat is geneticaly modified, since the 1930`s or something, and it had an extra protein that converts into fat 4 times faster that table sugar. It`s the new craze. It works. I stopped eating wheat and I almost have the washboard abs that I had 10 years ago!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2011 12:29 AM GMT
    This old thread has good suggestions for healthy eating. It's also interesting to see what other people here are eating.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2011 1:44 AM GMT
    Thanks for the information! Much Appreciated!

  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Nov 04, 2011 1:53 AM GMT
    From either library or bookstore, get a copy of The Zone and the book of food values that goes with it. Read and follow. Very flexible, very healthy and very down to earth.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Nov 04, 2011 2:41 AM GMT
    barriehomeboy saidEat anything you want, as long as it doesn`t involve wheat. No pasta, no bread, whole wheat or otherwise. You can eat all the carbs you want, no damage there. Just don`t eat wheat. Today`s wheat is geneticaly modified, since the 1930`s or something, and it had an extra protein that converts into fat 4 times faster that table sugar. It`s the new craze. It works. I stopped eating wheat and I almost have the washboard abs that I had 10 years ago!


    Really?

    I eat a large serving of pasta daily, plus some bread. With my breakfast, I have a LARGE bowl of bite-size shredded wheat that has no added salt or sugar. I do have sugar in the house; I use it only to poison ants by mixing it with boric acid.

    I also eat vegetables and drink a 240 ml glass of tomato juice and a 240 ml glass of orange juice daily. In addition, I drink about a liter of soy milk daily.

    Check out my bathing suite picture - do I seem to have a problem with fat?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2011 2:52 AM GMT
    Whole Foods has a great thing called an ANDI score which rates the relative nutritional value of various vegetables, fruits, grains, nuts, etc. Higher numbers are better, obv. The highest things are dark leafy greens like kale and chard. You can east some lower-ANDI stuff for variety and bulk but it helps you see what has more vitamins etc.

    One thing to remember is that the nutritional value of fresh food goes down if you don't eat it right away. If you're busy, flash-frozen vegetables may be a better bet so that the stuff doesn't spoil before you can use it. We put what we can't eat right away in a Ziploc bag or Pyrex container. so it doesn't get freezer burn.

    Also don't boil the hell out of veggies. Steaming is better.

    I just answered a thread at http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/1926153/ about a "cheap, quick healthy diet" yesterday or early today, please take a look. glad to answer anything specific if i can.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2011 6:27 AM GMT
    Thanks NJMEANWHILE!

    I copied and reposted your info from your other post.

    Stop drinking soda, fruit juice, beer, or anything that contains sugar or high-fructose corn syrup and drink water instead. Lots of water.

    Stop eating white bread, bagels, cake, cookies, muffins or anything made with refined flour and/or hydrogenated oils. This is probably 80% of what is available in a regular supermarket.

    Watch your intake of starchy foods like potatoes and corn. They break down in your system quickly and get stored as fat if you are taking in more than you can consume.

    Eat lean meats (chicken, turkey, fish) that you grill, broil or bake. If you must fry, use olive oil, not butter or lard.

    Practice portion control... as mentioned in another thread, restaurants give you way too much food. Take half of it home with you, and try to eat at home more.

    My trainer suggested a 40 carb/40 protein/20 fat ratio (by grams). You can use dailyburn.com to track how much you eat. It is a great site, and there are others out there like it.

    If you are also trying to add muscle mass you need more protein than fat. You probably do not want all of it to be meat. Look at lower fat, lower-cholesterol dairy options like cottage cheese and Greek yogurt to make up the difference.

    Watch your salt intake as it can be surprising how much you can take in without adding any to your food. Dailyburn helps with this too.

    Eat slower, less, more often, and pay attention to how you feel. Try not to wait til you physically feel hungry to eat, and try to stop eating before you feel stuffed.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 8:46 PM GMT
    BiBoston saidLost in Whole Foods - need help!
    The exit is that way -->

    icon_razz.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 9:18 PM GMT
    Not the first time I have posted this:

    I LIVE on wheat and extensive carb sources. But I eat almost exclusively WHOLE GRAINS. Sandwiches, yogurt and granola, shredded wheat, and I love bread with smoked salmon and cheese for a light dinner.

    Take a look at my pic, can't you tell all the harm it's doing me?

    There are some incredible nutritional benefits that you will be missing out on if you jump on the carb FAD bandwagon. Whole grains are an essential part to balanced nutrition and you should only be avoiding whole wheat if you are gluten intolerant.

    But on to other things, some people here have posted excellent advice regarding fruit and veggies. Remember to include beans with those, which despite their carbs, contain great amounts of protein, magnesium and potassium--essential building blocks for muscle function and muscle mass.

    I would also like to throw in a chip for probiotic dairy products. Unless you're concerned about lactose, go ahead and eliminate your milk, but include yogurt or kefir in your diet with live cultures. The bacteria set up shop in your intestine and significantly boost your body's ability to process and absorb essential nutrients. Probiotics will make a good diet even more effective.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 9:27 PM GMT
    Also for the Whole Foods thing.

    Watch out for them, they're tricky and good with marketing.

    By and large they specialize in carrying high end products. This is not necessarily good for you or the environment. If you want a $20 prime cut of steak, you will find the best one there, guaranteed.

    But sometimes it is nice to have quality products. I do believe that it is important to be conscious of the most effective ways to buy organic products (you don't have to be 100% organic to avoid the vast majority of, ahem, industrial byproducts and innumerable endocrine disrupters) just do some research as to what foods are most prone to the heavy use of agri-chems. It's simple ecology: toxics tend to bioaccumulate toward the top of the food chain through transport mechanisms that involve fatty acids. The best place to buy organic, therefore, is in dairy. Some veggies, like carrots, are hardly treated at all. Some things like celery and blueberries are a chemist's wet dream. Educate yourself.

    Whole foods has some down to earth prices in their produce section, but you really have to be careful of the scams in their bulk aisle and their bread and cereal aisle.

    As a rule of thumb, I shop first at King Sooper's. They are good at carrying many of the same products that Whole Foods does, but at much lower prices. Then what I don't find at Soopers either because of specialty or quality, then I head over to Whole Foods (mmm $8 per week on gourmet coffee!) and I bring my Sooper's receipt with me to compare prices between the two stores.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 9:51 PM GMT
    westanimas said

    As a rule of thumb, I shop first at King Sooper's. They are good at carrying many of the same products that Whole Foods does, but at much lower prices. Then what I don't find at Soopers either because of specialty or quality, then I head over to Whole Foods (mmm $8 per week on gourmet coffee!) and I bring my Sooper's receipt with me to compare prices between the two stores.


    This is true here as well... I have noticed that Stop-n-Shop has started carrying a lot of the same packaged grocery items (cereals, pastas, sauces, etc.) and it's possible to comparison shop. We are addicted to their house brand coffee, though.

    Also, at least for spices, Whole Foods has a "ghost brand" that other supermarket chains sell. Same jar, same typeface, same product.

    Regarding yogurt, I am convinced that my daily greek yogurt intake has a lot to do with how rarely I get sick.

    And yea, I totally forgot about beans. We eat cannelloni and kidney beans. I like them in a cold dish with brown rice and diced tomato, cuke, etc., with just a light vinegar/lemon dressing for flavor.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 9:54 PM GMT
    njmeanwhile said
    westanimas said

    As a rule of thumb, I shop first at King Sooper's. They are good at carrying many of the same products that Whole Foods does, but at much lower prices. Then what I don't find at Soopers either because of specialty or quality, then I head over to Whole Foods (mmm $8 per week on gourmet coffee!) and I bring my Sooper's receipt with me to compare prices between the two stores.


    This is true here as well... I have noticed that Stop-n-Shop has started carrying a lot of the same packaged grocery items (cereals, pastas, sauces, etc.) and it's possible to comparison shop. We are addicted to their house brand coffee, though.

    Also, at least for spices, Whole Foods has a "ghost brand" that other supermarket chains sell. Same jar, same typeface, same product.

    Regarding yogurt, I am convinced that my daily greek yogurt intake has a lot to do with how rarely I get sick.

    And yea, I totally forgot about beans. We eat cannelloni and kidney beans. I like them in a cold dish with brown rice and diced tomato, cuke, etc., with just a light vinegar/lemon dressing for flavor.


    I love fresh pinto beans...so sweet! And wrapped in a tortilla with a home made green chile sauce and an ungodly amount of shredded cheese... ohmgawd.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 10:02 PM GMT
    Have you messed with trying to re-soak dried beans at all? I have tried and it feels like a lot more trouble than it's worth. I have heard it is good to save and re-use the water for soup, etc.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 10:07 PM GMT
    http://www.sparkpeople.com/

    This is a free site that has the option to recommend meals consistent with your goals. You can also log what you eat to monitor your diet and and can help you maintain accountability to yourself.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 10:12 PM GMT
    njmeanwhile saidHave you messed with trying to re-soak dried beans at all? I have tried and it feels like a lot more trouble than it's worth. I have heard it is good to save and re-use the water for soup, etc.


    I always cook my beans that way. I get a particular brand that is grown here in Colorado, it costs me $15 by the 20# sack. It seems like a bit of a hassle, but it's super easy and super cheap to do it this way. When you do this you need to first sort the beans by spreading them out on a plate by the handful, and looking for small stones that could get in with them. Then once sorted, rinse them out, and soak them in a pot of water for at least 6 hours. Overnight is better. Then salt the water and give em a slow simmer for about 2-3 hours. They come out really nice.

    The "bean juice" water is an excellent base for soups or sauces. If you are careful not to over salt it, it is wonderful.

    I once got a rock out of a can of beans that chipped a tooth...I have never had any problems sorting them myself.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 10:40 PM GMT
    westanimas said
    njmeanwhile saidHave you messed with trying to re-soak dried beans at all? I have tried and it feels like a lot more trouble than it's worth. I have heard it is good to save and re-use the water for soup, etc.


    I always cook my beans that way. I get a particular brand that is grown here in Colorado, it costs me $15 by the 20# sack. It seems like a bit of a hassle, but it's super easy and super cheap to do it this way. When you do this you need to first sort the beans by spreading them out on a plate by the handful, and looking for small stones that could get in with them. Then once sorted, rinse them out, and soak them in a pot of water for at least 6 hours. Overnight is better. Then salt the water and give em a slow simmer for about 2-3 hours. They come out really nice.

    The "bean juice" water is an excellent base for soups or sauces. If you are careful not to over salt it, it is wonderful.

    I once got a rock out of a can of beans that chipped a tooth...I have never had any problems sorting them myself.


    Cool, well maybe we'll give it another spin. I need to find a better local source for dried beans than WFM, which right now seems to be the only option.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 06, 2011 9:43 AM GMT
    Thanks again for the information! Much appreciated.

    Just checked out www.sparkpeople.com and this could be a great resources along with www.dailyburn.com

    Some much to learn!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 06, 2011 2:08 PM GMT
    Do not ever eat wheat. It is terrible for you. It´s not just the gluten, it´s the wheat. You are better drinking maple syrup than eating brown bread.


    MickyTG said much what I would have, though eat more fish. Salmon for one meal, a white fish for another, maybe shrimp for another.

    Here is a very simple recipe which I love at the moment:

    cut two carrots and two sticks of celery into short sticks, maybe have another vegetable like bell peppers, onion or leek. Put in a pan with olive oil and then put two fish steaks on top. pour on half a cup of water and a pinch of salt and put a tight lid on.

    Leave til the fish is cooked, take the lid off, let it dry out, poss moving veg around to stop sticking.

    It´s really very nice.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 06, 2011 2:13 PM GMT
    Were you snowed in? How awful. I hope you didn't run out of fags.