Piano Please ♪♪♫

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2011 7:17 AM GMT
    How long have you played piano for? What style of piano do you perform? Who's your favorite composer/artist?

    I'm self taught, but I play a great majority of romantic period solo piano music. I composed with a mix of romantic and new age. My favorite composers are Chopin and Liszt. As for modern artist, I love Coldplay's and The Fray's older Albums when they used more piano.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2011 2:16 PM GMT
    I have always wanted to learn, its one of my life goals, and as such, i'm starting piano lessons next week! I'm excited.

    How long did it take for you to learn to play and be able to play such complex pieces?

    My favorites are mostly soundtracks, and can't wait to learn how to play them!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2011 2:25 PM GMT
    I have played since I was five, only took lessons for a year or so. I play mostly rock, some standards, some music for church. Not good enough to play classical.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2011 2:26 PM GMT
    I started learning piano in college and it became my concentration instrument. Tchaikovsky's "October" from 'The Seasons' is fun to play. As far as modern artists go, I'd live to find books by Diana Krall and Tori Amos.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2011 2:32 PM GMT
    20 years? I dont play much anymore.... It doesnt pay the bills enough... guitar is much more popular, so I spend more time on that...
  • fitdude62

    Posts: 294

    Nov 04, 2011 2:43 PM GMT
    I started tinkering when I was 3. Started lessons at 5. Traveled 30 countries for 18 months when I was 18-19 playing concerts. But that was a lifetime ago.

    I still play for myself but not as much as I'd like. Mostly Classical and Ragtime now.

    Too many favorite composers to list.

    For those of you just starting out.....ENJOY! It's a great way to express yourself.

    Peace
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2011 3:18 PM GMT
    jpBITCHva saidStarted piano lessons at age 4.
    Age 16: entered uni as a piano performance major
    Age 16.5: Realized I was never going to be Horowitz
    Age 16.75: Became a cocktail lounge pianist (lied about my age, though in those years you were legal at 1icon_cool.gif.



    Those are pretty chill though.. I liked lounge playing icon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2011 3:52 PM GMT
    Started when I was 9. Love playing melancholic pieces with complex harmonic structures. Favorites to play and listen to are Szymanowski and Satie.

    Szymanowski:


    Satie:


    Also love all of the piano collections of Nobuo Uematsu's Final Fantasy compositions:




    Also one of my favorites to play:
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2011 4:17 PM GMT
    I am a pianist and I compose my own music as well.

    http://www.joshkreydatus.com


  • wellwell

    Posts: 2265

    Nov 04, 2011 4:34 PM GMT
    I want a new CC - 94 so bad; I can taste it. I've even got room 4 it, but the $'s; as yet, remain illusive !!









    ...Too bad youtube has no better quality examples than these (that I know of).
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2011 5:06 PM GMT
    zsocerstar saidI have always wanted to learn, its one of my life goals, and as such, i'm starting piano lessons next week! I'm excited.

    How long did it take for you to learn to play and be able to play such complex pieces?

    My favorites are mostly soundtracks, and can't wait to learn how to play them!



    I would give you free lessons if you live closer icon_wink.gif



    Out of RJers I know me, aerovaulter, Trackman, and it looks like Kappy2 plays the piano. Who else plays piano? It is my major weakness, please inform me. I know Trolli plays the horn and the cymbal. He might play the piano too. This guy plays the cello but he might play piano on the side.

    I dunno. I dunno! There is something about a guy that plays instrument that drives me nuts, especially when they play the piano. When they start playing Chopin I can just feel myself becoming...aroused. *shame*
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2011 5:14 PM GMT
    Allways wanted to learn to play ragtime icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 8:59 AM GMT
    You guys should upload videos if you ever perform. Even if it's just lounging around or impromptu. I've played for about 15 years now. I got serious around the time I was introduced to Franz Liszt. Though, I say for now, and probably ever more, my heart lies with Chopin. Oh and Sutadyerk, tomorrow, I'm going to check out your music. Thanks for providing that link :-) As for the guy above me, you should definitely get a few books, or find someone who plays a lot of ragtime. :-)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 9:55 AM GMT
    Katamarino saidMy favorite composers are Chopin and Liszt.


    Which is why I consider myself so lucky to be a fan of Bach! icon_cool.gif

    In Bach's repertoire you have an almost linear crescendo of difficulty (starting from zero) and there is no difficulty/satisfaction correlation: everything is very cool and rewarding from the very beginning. You don't play the most difficult pieces prematurely because the easier works are not just good to the fingers but to the ears too.

    I too love Chopin, Liszt and the whole Romantic repertoire, but from the point of view of a player, what can you do without the specific skills of the Bachian repertoire? Play Hanon until you can start Chopin's Études? Czerny? I know the Études are very didactic too, but something (preferably something interesting) must come before them, they are not for beginners.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 10:21 AM GMT
    bachian said
    Katamarino saidMy favorite composers are Chopin and Liszt.


    Which is why I consider myself so lucky to be a fan of Bach! icon_cool.gif

    In Bach's repertoire you have an almost linear crescendo of difficulty (starting from zero) and there is no difficulty/satisfaction correlation: everything is very cool and rewarding from the very beginning. You don't play the most difficult pieces prematurely because the easier works are not just good to the fingers but to the ears too.

    I too love Chopin, Liszt and the whole Romantic repertoire, but from the point of view of a player, what can you do without the specific skills of the Bachian repertoire? Play Hanon until you can start Chopin's Études? Czerny? I know the Études are very didactic too, but something (preferably something interesting) must come before them, they are not for beginners.


    Funny thing...love Bach's music, but I don't play it as much as the next person...my fingers are so afraid of his fugues! As for Hanon or Czerny...my books are collecting dust...and umh...well, they will continue to collect dust until someone slaps my hands and tells me "you know better!" Anyhow, I and countless others are living, breathing examples of what one can do without Bachian Repertoire. In fact, playing through Bach's beginning to intermediate repertoire does very little in preparing one for Chopin's music, or romantic period piano in general. Bach gives life to individual fingers. Bach enhances hand eye when it comes to reading music. but Bach does not help with complex phrasing that comes with romantic music...phrasing in where the dynamics would change twice or more within a single phrase. Bach does not dabble in rubato and he does very little for legato style of playing. It actually is quite easy to perform a large range of music without ever laying a finger on any of Bach's works. I couldn't make a fair comparison between Chopin and Bach...Two totally different styles of music. Though, I humbly bow down to you because my fingers don't posses the ability to individually carry their own phrasing within one hand. I agree heavily in that Chopin's music, there is no beginning or intermediate lvl pieces to satisfy the beginner. There is no linear crescendo on the difficulty scale...more like an exponential increase...jk (that sounds more like Liszt). A lot of pianist mistakenly believe they can grab his Nocturne Op 9 No 2 in Eb, or his Minute Waltz and call it a beginners piece. A lot of his works that appear at a beginners or intermediate level are misleading. It takef a lot to incorporate Chopin's subtle pedaling, his rubato,and such. But, to me, that's what makes his music all the more rewarding. Chopin never composed his pieces (even his etudes) for reason of practice, or solely for technical gain. He composed from his soul. He rarely depicted any kind of settings. He let's his music paint a picture. He's a melodic genius. He instinctively knows how to evoke strong emotions through chord progressions. Though he doesn't focus on fingers carrying out their own medodic as one would in baroque, he gave extreme importance to both hands being able to act independently in counter rhythm.

    As for his etudes, didactic isn't the best adjective. I recommend playing one of bach's two or three part inventions, a hanon exercise, and a chopin etude one after the other. You'll see an objective truth that the Chopin Etudes are too ornamented and free flowing to be considered bookish. Each etude has a fixed technical item it focuses on, but they are candy coated with sweet melodic and harmonic awesomeness that one will forget he or she is strengthening a technique. They are almost like songs in their own rights. The fact that they are published as "ETUDES" is extremely misleading.

    Anyhow, I'm in no way dogging Bach...the supreme master of fugue and counterpoint. Don't even get me started on my love for his choral works! Anyhow, yeah, I agree...Chopin's not the guy to go to to learn piano. He's the guy to go to when you are nearing the point where you become one with the piano. Very rewarding at that point.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 11:18 AM GMT
    Katamarino, you must know from Chopin's biography that the man himself was big fan of Bach and Mozart. This is what he once said to one of his friends:

    ChopinIf you have plenty of time, memorize Bach; only by memorizing a work does one become able to play it perfectly. Without Bach you cannot have freedom in the fingers, nor a clear and beautiful tone. Without Bach there is no true pianist. A pianist who doesn't recognize Bach is a bungler.


    I can also say that the technique of Bach's repertoire is very different of that of Beethoven, yet this composer is known to have played the well tempered clavier for 10 years during his childhood. I agree that playing Chopin is whole different game, but it's like saying back muscles won't help you on your bench press. icon_lol.gif

    Another thing... it hurts my feelings to suggest Bach's keyboard music has no soul, alright? icon_cry.gif He would be just another Czerny if it were true... I can cry on some of his preludes and fugues that many would consider arid...

    I'm still curious... how did you lay out your foundation to play Chopin and Liszt?

    By the way, my favorite piece from Chopin is the 17th prelude op. 28. Way too popular for you? icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 12:10 PM GMT
    That citation is so true...minus one thing.

    Without Bach you cannot have freedom in the fingers, nor a clear and beautiful tone. Without Bach there is no true pianist. A pianist who doesn't recognize Bach is a bungler.

    Substitute the word Bach for proper technique. Bach isn't the only source of pieces to build freedom in fingering. Bach isn't the only source in which one can bring maturity to tone quality. I do worship guys like Bach, Beethoven, and Chopin, but as a fellow human being, I can confidently point out Chopin's quote as a subjective statement. My point is not that one should avoid Bach, but that there are countless composers, and countless exercises that can cater to individual pianist, yet aim for the same ends. For me personally, I get no more pleasure playing through Bach's Inventions than I do with generic finger exercises. I hope that brings clarity in regards to the "Back muscles won't help with bench press" In our views, we are both referencing different and separate muscles fibers in the back. We are both referring to good technique, producing good tone...just different ways to go about it.

    As for Bach not having soul, sillllllllly gorgeous guy you. Those words never left my fingers! That, I am sure of. Bach had plenty of soul...I listen religiously to his choral and orchestra pieces. I know that most of his works, he did in the glory of God. Though, you'd be surprised, not all of his works were done in the glory of god. Some of his works, even religious works were rip offs of secular pieces. Some of his works were composed simply for the instruction of his students (inventions, sinfonias...yah!). Some were composed for entertainment, or simply because he was commissioned to do so for a earning of sorts. Bach has more soul than my Grandma's cookings, but...as far as keyboard works go...I will say that Chopin, who's works are almost entirely exclusive to keyboard, conveyed more emotion. I can not name one piece Chopin has composed that had not soul, nor failed to paint strong imagery of sorts. Chopin, to my knowledge, never composed for instructional purposes. To me, Chopin embodies soul, as it was his MO for composing. He didn't use lyrics, he didn't set a scene upon which to composed. His only avenue was to let his melody do the talking. When I picture soul, I have to feel a strong emotional out pour from his works. I don't get that from his keyboard works. What I get is beautiful tone and execution...but it's too mechanical. When I picture Bach, I see him first as a mechanical pianist. Then second, as a soul poring choral/orch composer. In the latter, that's where I say Bach has soul...immeasurable rich soul. That same level of soul just doesn't show in his keyboard works.

    As for playing, believe it or not, video game and anime music set the stage for me to begin tackling Chopin. Super Mario Bros...you have Koji Kondo to think for that. Or the Final Fantasy series...I am a die hard fan of Nobuo Uematsu. Believe me, there are a lot of video game, solo piano pieces that border the line of impossible when it comes to performance. Oh, and the difficulty/satisfaction ratio will be more than set at ease when it comes to video game music. Think of the number of video games...think of the number of themes from each game. Think of the number of remixes of themes. The number of pieces to play from in that genre, and the levels of difficulty are pretty much innumerable.

    Anyhow, after a couple of years of playing video game music, I gained the skill to tackle Chopin pieces. I started out with his preludes, his slower waltzes and nocturnes. His Fantasy Impromptu was shoved in my face...like with most pianists, lol. His etudes Op. 10 No. 1, 2, 3, 12, were on my level. As for Liszt. that has been a slow transition. I'm bought a book for his transcendental etudes, but realistically, there are a few of them that are out of my league. I can play No. 1, 2, 3, 10. and 11. No. 4 is tiring, and 5 is worlds beyond what my fingers are capable of at such speeds. His Liebestraume is lovely. With Liszt, it's a bit of a challenge to pick a piece at my current level. All the same, he has countless number of pieces. Not counting his transcriptions, Liszt has a HUGE repertoire of pieces he composed in his lifetime.

    Hmmmm. Chopin's Prelude Op 28 No 4...it's overplayed...maybe...I think. But it doesn't take away from the beauty of his piece. To have his own prelude played at his funeral...no amount of overplaying can take away from that. Hey, what are a few of your favorite prelude/fugue combo's you'd suggest for me to listen to? I do think it's about time for me to get reacquainted with Bach to build my sight reading and such.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 12:44 PM GMT
    I'm sorry, I still like all the classics, but after 30+ years of playing the piano, I'm mainly concentrating on sightreading little known composers. And there are LOTS of them. There's a guy on this site
    www.pianophilia.com

    named Alfor who scans the most arcane music that makes interesting sightreading.
    Maruice HInson's Guide to the Pianist's Repertoire is very helpful.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 12:47 PM GMT
    Thanks, I'll definitely check this site out!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 12:50 PM GMT
    I've played for 22 years. Since I'm a pianist for a dance institute, I'm required to play many styles of music, but I really enjoy playing pop, jazz, and standards.

    My favorite classical composers are Debussy (for his beautiful melodies) and Liszt (for his technical prowess).

    Cool thread...icon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 6:09 PM GMT
    Katamarino saidThat same level of soul just doesn't show in his keyboard works.


    Dude, seriously, RJ doesn't look like the best place for a querelle des bouffons. icon_lol.gif

    It's hard to discuss feelings or to imply that you should feel what I feel since this is subjective. It's like a bisexual discussing with a heterosexual about the joys of gay sex. If you're not into guys, it's hard to explain the attraction.

    All I can say with all honesty is that one of the things I enjoy the most listening are his harpsichord works (especially the english suites, well tempered clavier and the goldberg variations).

    I'll send you a PM later with some recommendations, but for now I'll leave you with the souless aria from the goldberg variations. icon_smile.gif